Channels/Reviews

Make sure you follow this channel for all the latest bike and product reviews. Including first looks at the latest technologies. First ride reviews on the hottest new bikes and longterm reviews on many different products.

Latest Videos

Latest Articles

9pts - 22/10/2019 19:34:21

Gazelle Medeo T9 HMB

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
8pts - 22/10/2019 11:34:13

After the disappearance of the Mega TR in 2016, Nukeproof were left without a dedi...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
16pts - 21/10/2019 14:17:13

Competition in high-end kids' bikes is getting fierce. How does the Kona Process 24 stack ...

Posted by
Bike Mag
10pts - 21/10/2019 07:17:14

Alchemy's latest trail bike makes a compelling argument that less equals more.

Posted by
Pinkbike
18pts - 18/10/2019 21:34:14

"Crest" single-crown forks are designed and produced at Giant's facility in Taiwa...

Posted by
Pinkbike
25pts - 18/10/2019 17:01:04

Posted by
Bike Radar
26pts - 18/10/2019 15:00:51

Get an in-depth insight into the steps taken to produce the custom YT frames for ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
15pts - 18/10/2019 13:34:13

Chris Porter talks about why he thinks the industry has been designing bikes the ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 18/10/2019 00:51:25

Posted by
The Bike Dads - RSS
4pts - 17/10/2019 16:01:02

The Furious has been updated with a longer reach, shorter chainstays, and a stiff...

Posted by
Pinkbike

Latest Photos

9 - 22/10/2019 19:34:21

Gazelle Medeo T9 HMB Royal Dutch Gazelle celebrated its 100th anniversary of making bikes in 1992. The title Royal was awarded to them by Princess Margriet that year. After 127 years, they now employ 350 people in their factory in Dieren, Netherlands, and they make over 250,000 bikes a year. Gazelle doesnt sell direct-to-consumer, but their website has a way to find your best bike shop, where you can buy one or have it shipped there for assembly with a requisite two-month checkup. THE BIKE The Medeo follows fairly traditional design lines. This model is only available in a low step-through version, with classic lines, an SR SunTour suspension fork, a full chain guard to keep your clothes clean and internally routed cables all around. There are three sizes to fit most riders, and three rich color optionsIvory, Georgia Peach and the one we had, Jeans Blue. THE PARTS Gazelle has gone with Magura hydraulic rim brakes. These are known for great stopping power and very low maintenance. Theres no cable to stretch over time, and these provide ample control and modulation. The sturdy rear rack encloses the battery for protection and comes with an elastic strap system that we found very useful. A cafe lock is attached to the rear triangle, making it easy to quickly lock your bike when you have to run into a store or while youre lingering at a coffee shop. While not bulletproof, its enough to keep someone from easily rolling it away with the bike. Consider it flair, some bit of extra style put in by Gazelle. The well-padded Selle Royal Herz saddle is part of the overall ergonomics of the bike. The handlebars have a nice, relaxed sweep back, with ergonomic grips and an adjustable stem that allow you to vary your ride position from fully upright to slightly more aggressive. Integrated lighting, front and rear, is standard on this bike. The headlight is bright, which is great for seeing and being seen. It has an interesting design with the side windows to make it far more visible from the side as well.   Going into the details, the double-wall rims have eyelets for the spoke nipples and 14-gauge spokes to handle the extra forces of an e-bike, plus allow for carrying cargo on the bike. Included SKS fenders are a nice touch, which, like the chain guard, help keep you and the bike clean. THE MOTOR A Bosch Active Line Plus mid-drive motor powers this bike. Bosch has been continually working on this motor, and it is powerful enough for a commuter at 50 N/m of torque, but also one of the quietest of the Bosch mid-drives. It uses a full-size front sprocket for the Shimano Deore 1×9 drivetrain. The Bosch system detects shifts and almost imperceptibly cuts power for a split second to reduce stress on the drivetrain. The included cafe lock is a nice touch, though wed also recommend locking the bike to something else using a second lock in any city.   The 400-Wh battery is nestled inside the rear rack to keep it out of the step-through frame. They went with a 400-Wh battery over a 500-Wh version to keep the bike priced under $2500. Conveniently, the battery uses the same key as the cafe lock. A Bosch Purion display was selected for simplicity, as the display sits on the left side of the bars and the mode controls are integrated into the display. Its a monochrome display and offers Walk mode to help walk the bike up hills if needed. The Shimano Deore 9-speed setup was perfect all around town, even on the hilly areas.   WHO ITS MADE FOR The Medeo is aimed squarely at commuters, but its also a good bet for people who run errands and just plain ride for fun. It has enough power to flatten most hills, so if you live in a hilly area (even one as extreme as San Francisco), this definitely fits the bill. Using the name badge as an integral part of internal cable routing is a unique idea. Gazelle is all about the fine details.   THE RIDE Adjusting the bike to fit you takes just a few minutes with a set of hex keys. Once dialed, we did notice that to get proper leg extension, you really have to have the seat high enough to make standing on the ground a tip-toes-only situation. Some of our test riders exclaimed that they preferred stepping off the seat altogether at stoplights. The Bosch Active Line Plus motor is smooth, quiet and powerful, offering plenty of support at all levels, and topping off at 275-percent max in Turbo mode. With the 1.6-inch tires and proper inflation (50-60 psi), theres little rolling resistance. The rear rack holds and protects the battery inside and is very useful for carrying cargo with the three built-in elastic straps.   That same high pressure in the tires equates to a lot of energy from bumps being transferred to your body, up through the frame and the seat. The seat does have elastomer shock absorbers, but some riders will enjoy the ride more if they add a suspension seatpost to take out the bumps like the short-travel fork does. The frame has a downtube and a top tube that parallels it tightly, and as such theres a fair amount of flex in the frame. Its noticeable while riding. Some compromises had to be made, considering where the weight of the battery is, and not putting it in the way of the low-step frame. An SR Suntour CR7 fork offers 40mm of travel to tame the bumps in the road.   The Magura hydraulic rim brakes offer good control, and because theyre on the rim, they have a large diameter to work with, which offers a leverage advantage, but less surface area than comparable disc brakes. You can also feel every imperfection in your rims as you go. The levers are really nice. Theyre big enough to use four fingers on, but also responsive enough to use one finger or two, and they have adjustable throw that can be adjusted without tools. Overall ergonomics are good. The bars offer a very comfortable riding position and a very light touch for steering. The slight rake of the fork keeps your toes from hitting the fender flare at the bottom when steering. We put in miles on all types of terrain, in windy conditions and not, with plenty of climbs. The 400-Wh battery offers surprising range, and we didnt use Eco mode at all. If you want to do any touring with this bike, there is a 500-Wh version of this battery, and we could easily see riding with one of those strapped on the top of the rack to swap out when the other battery was run down. One thing that is a pain is that the battery must be fully removed to charge. Youll always have the key handy, as one is required in the cafe lock, but it cannot be removed unless the rear wheel is locked. If you decide to charge the battery while you go run other errands, youll have to lock the rear wheel, unlock and remove the battery, then replace the key, and unlock the lock. THE VERDICT At $2500, this bike is fun to ride whether youre an experienced rider or this is your first e-bike. The build quality and components point to this bike lasting for many years, especially with good maintenance. It could be a good workhorse for commuters and/or a great bike to go on long rides to get some wind in your hair. SPECS GAZELLE MEDEO T9 HMB Price: $2499 Motor: Bosch Active Line Plus 3.0 (50 N/m) Battery: Bosch, 400Wh Charge time: 4.5 hours Top speed: 20 mph Range: 2550 miles (tested) Drive: Shimano Deore 9-speed Brakes: Magura hydraulic rim brakes Controls: Bosch Purion LCD Fork: SR SunTour CR7 w/ 40mm travel Frame: Aluminum Tires: Continental Ride City, 28×1.6 Weight: 49.3 lb. Color choice: Ivory, Georgia Peach, Jeans Blue Sizes: 46cm, 53cm, 57cm www.gazellebikes.com   THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Bike Review: Gazelle Medeo T9 HMB appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
8 - 22/10/2019 11:34:13

After the disappearance of the Mega TR in 2016, Nukeproof were left without a dedicated short-travel trail bike in their range. However, that gap has now been filled! The new Nukeproof Reactor 275 has 150/140 mm travel 27.5 wheels and a fun-loving attitude. Read our first impressions here! Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS | 160/140 mm travel (f/r) | 27.5 wheels | 5,399.99 | 14.1 kg (Medium) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Do you prefer to race or play? Does speed take priority over fun? And do you prefer to chase Strava segments or session loamy corners? These are the questions you will have to ask yourself when deciding between a Reactor 290 and a Reactor 275, as Nukeproof are offering their new trail bike in both 29 and 27.5 options. The 275 model we tested is supposedly all about having fun. Its smaller wheels should boost maneuverability and really encourage you to play with the trail ahead. We took one for some laps of our local riding spot in Scotland to see how it performs. The new Reactor 275 RS in detail The Reactor takes its name from Nukeproofs original trail hardtail from the 90s, however, it does not have much in common with its namesake. Starting fresh allowed Nukeproof to design the new Reactor from the ground up. They claim this has allowed them to create the ultimate trail bike for taking on demanding terrain. The Nukeproof Reactor is available in both carbon and alloy builds. The flagship 275 RS model we tested features a full carbon frame. The Reactor shares Nukeproof’s swing-link driven 4-bar Horst layout with their Dissent DH bike and the latest Mega enduro bikes. The Reactors suspension system features 21.5% progression and, according to Nukeproof, has better sensitivity at the start of its travel as well as increased mid and end-stroke support when compared to the Mega. Anti-squat is around 92% at sag (in a 32-50t gear ratio). The sizing is relatively generous, with the Medium Reactor 275 featuring a 450 mm reach. All sizes have space for a bottle cage inside the main triangle. The frame features a flip-chip as well as a number of details that give it a quality feel. The flip-chip lets you adjust the Reactors head angle and bottom bracket height by choosing between a Trail and Rail setting. In the lower Rail setting, the head angle is slackened by 0.5簞 and the bottom bracket height is lowered by 6 mm, taking the bottom bracket drop to -24 mm. The flip-chip lets you adjust the Reactors geometry slightly. We rode it in the lower Rail setting. The ribbed chainstay protector does a great job of silencing chain slap The Reactors cable routing is neat and rattle-free The spec of the Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS The 275 RS is the flagship model in Nukeproofs 27.5 Reactor lineup, so it is no surprise to see it decked out with some seriously nice components. It is easy to see that Nukeproof have specced their top model primarily for descending performance – this bike has a burly build! The suspension of the RS model is taken care of by top of the range RockShox products. Upfront, a RockShox Lyrik Ultimate delivers 160 mm travel and is matched with a RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate rear shock. A SRAM X01 Eagle drivetrain delivers crisp shifting performance and the powerful SRAM Code RSC brakes are a great choice in our opinion, as they deliver very usable power and are easy to modulate. Providing grip are two of our favourite MAXXIS tires (the Assegai 2.5 WT and Minion DHRII 2.4 WT) which are mounted to a Mavic Deemax DH wheelset. A RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper and Nukeproof finishing kit complete a very solid build. Ultimate – the RockShox Lyrik Ultimate is a top performer and a firm favourite The RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate is custom-tuned and adjustable Big rotors are always a welcome sight As are SRAMs Code RSC stoppers The MAXXIS tires in their WT width and EXO+ casing are a great choice and provide bucket-loads of confidence-inspiring grip Fork RockShox Lyrik Ultimate Charger 2 RTC3 160 mm Rear shock RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate RTC 140 mm Brakes SRAM Code RSC 200/180 mm rotors (f/r) Drivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth 125/150/170/200 mm Stem Nukeproof Horizon 50 mm Bars Nukeproof Horizon Carbon 780 mm Wheels Mavic Deemax DH 27.5″ Tires MAXXIS Assegai 2.5 WT EXO+, Minion DHR II 2.4 WT EXO+ Weight 14.1 kg (Medium) Price 5,399.99 The finishing kit is mainly made up of Nukeproofs in-house components. This is no bad thing though – the Horizon bar and stem feel and look great. The geometry of the Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS The geometry of the Reactor 275 stays the same between the carbon and alloy models. However, the RS model we tested comes with a 160 mm fork (instead of 150 mm) which slackens the head and seat angles slightly and raises the front of the bike a little as well as shortening the reach by a couple of millimeters. The 65簞 head angle and oversized fork give the Reactor 275 RS a very confident front end. It loves chopping through rough trails and stays unfazed on the steeps. The seat angle could be a tad steeper (74.6簞 in low setting), however, the pedaling position still feels comfortable enough for steep ascents and long days in the saddle. Overall, the geometry and handling are more on the playful side, but that doesnt mean that the Reactor 275 cant hold its own in the rough. Size (Low) S M L XL Seat tube 381 mm 420 mm 458 mm 508 mm Top tube 581 mm 611 mm 641 mm 676 mm Head tube 110 mm 115 mm 120 mm 125 mm Head angle 65簞 65簞 65簞 65簞 Seat angle 74.6簞 74.6簞 74.6簞 74.6簞 Chainstay 430 mm 430 mm 430 mm 430 mm BB Height 333 mm 333 mm 333 mm 333 mm Wheelbase 1154 mm 1185 mm 1216 mm 1251 mm Reach 420 mm 450 mm 478 mm 512 mm Stack 603 mm 609 mm 613 mm 617 mm How does it ride? The Reactor 275 RS on the trail We tested the Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS on our home trails and ran it in the lower Rail setting. Climbing with the Reactor 275 RS is a comfortable affair. The bike climbs well and feels more than suited for long days in the saddle. Its not as fast as an XC-racer but eels more eager up the climbs than an enduro sled. There is some pedal-bob when spinning at a high cadence on flatter sections of trail due to the lower anti-squat, however, this can be eradicated by using the adjustable damping switch on the shock. The seat angle on the RS build is not the steepest at 74.6簞 (in the Rail position), so if you regularly encounter long, steep climbs we would recommend sliding the saddle forward on its rails to keep your weight nice and central. The Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS climbs willingly and feels somewhere in between an XC bike and an enduro sled on the accents Descending on the Reactor 275 RS is all about one thing – having maximum fun. The bike is incredibly easy to flick around and loves to pop off roots, rocks and jumps. The suspension is not the most supple, instead, it has loads of mid and end stroke support. This means that the bike maintains its geometry when cornering hard or landing deep off a jump or drop. It also gives the Reactor a bottomless feel and means the bike has enough reserves for flowy bike-park trails and steeper enduro tracks. Helmet POC Tectal SPIN | Jersey Cult of Shred 2 Tone SS | Shorts FOX Ranger | Kneepads 7iDP Covert | Gloves 100% | Socks Loose Riders Descending on the Reactor 275 RS is all about one thing – having maximum fun and playing with the trail googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Aside from its playfulness, we also noticed how quiet the Nukeproof Reactor 275 is on the trail. There is no chain slap or rattling to be heard. The only sounds we observed whilst riding the bike was the noise of the MAXXIS tires hooking up with the dirt and the suspension swallowing up hits. Speaking of the suspension, Nukeproofs new 4-bar Horst layout provides bucket-loads of support and traction. The Reactor feels balanced in the corners and allows you to efficiently generate speed when pumping through berms and rollers. Whilst riding the bike it is clear to see why Nukeproof chose to go with a no-nonsense, heavy-duty spec. The bike feels tough, confident and begs for flat landings and squared-off corners. So, how do you choose between the Nukeproof Reactor and the Nukeproof Mega, its longer travel stablemate? We can safely say that unless you only want to ride the gnarliest terrain around, you will have more fun on the shorter travel Reactor. It wont hold you back! Conclusion The Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS is awesome fun to ride. In its 27.5 guise, the Reactor is best suited for a rider looking for a do-it-all trail bike who prioritises fun over flat-out charging. If you want a more planted bike with greater ability to carry speed, the 29 models are probably better suited for your needs. Overall, the Nukeproof Reactor 275 RS impressed us with its playful nature, bombproof spec and fair price. We look forward to comparing it against its toughest competition soon. For more info head to: nukeproof.com

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
16 - 21/10/2019 14:17:13

Competition in high-end kids' bikes is getting fierce. How does the Kona Process 24 stack up? The post Tested: Kona Process 24 appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
10 - 21/10/2019 07:17:14

Alchemy's latest trail bike makes a compelling argument that less equals more.( Photos: 21, Comments: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
18 - 18/10/2019 21:34:14

"Crest" single-crown forks are designed and produced at Giant's facility in Taiwan, initially for OEM products.( Photos: 5 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
25 - 18/10/2019 17:01:04

Look walked us through highlights from its new Geo-Trekking pedal range at this years Eurobike show. Designed for off-road and urban/commuter style riding, the Geo-Trekking line consists of several double-sided pedals that give the rider a choice of either using regular footwear or clipping into an SPD-compatible clipless side. There are composite and aluminium body options to suit different budgets and riding styles, while some of the pedals feature removable LED lights to enhance safety.

Posted by
Bike Radar
26 - 18/10/2019 15:00:51

Get an in-depth insight into the steps taken to produce the custom YT frames for Rampage 2019.( Photos: 27 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
15 - 18/10/2019 13:34:13

Chris Porter talks about why he thinks the industry has been designing bikes the wrong way.( Comments: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike