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Latest Articles

0pts - 5 hours ago

The fourth-generation Tallboy has arrived with an all-new frame, more travel, and...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 5 hours ago

Launched back in 2009, the original Santa Cruz Tallboy arrived in the lineup as the brand&...

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
14pts - 19/08/2019 17:34:31

Trek recently gave a total facelift to its the Fuel...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
11pts - 16/08/2019 21:01:06

KÜAT NV 2.0 RAMP

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
31pts - 16/08/2019 14:01:01

IXS have announced a new ultra-light, DH-certified full face helmet.( Photo...

Posted by
Pinkbike
25pts - 16/08/2019 10:17:22

Trailcross flat-pedal shoes break new ground with Five Ten's best rubber soles, u...

Posted by
Pinkbike
37pts - 15/08/2019 14:17:23

Trek recently presented their brand-new Fuel EX 2020 during a launch in Northern I...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
40pts - 15/08/2019 14:01:00

Trek's trail bike gets an all-new frame with tweaked suspension and fresh geometr...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 14/08/2019 05:17:28

If you’re following the EWS, you’ve probably noticed that CUBE has released a new ...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
4pts - 13/08/2019 16:17:23

The brand new 2020 Specialized Enduro 29 has little in common with its predecessor...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS

Latest Photos

0 - 5 hours ago

The fourth-generation Tallboy has arrived with an all-new frame, more travel, and fresh geometry.( Photos: 22, Comments: 6 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
2 - 5 hours ago

Launched back in 2009, the original Santa Cruz Tallboy arrived in the lineup as the brand’s very first 29er mountain bike. Equipped with the dual-link VPP suspension design, 100mm of rear travel and a 100mm travel fork, the Tallboy soon found favour with XC riders and marathon racers all around the globe, who praised it for its efficiency and fast-rolling demeanour. It also happened to be a ripping bike to ride on technical singletrack too, at a time where a lot of 29ers were pure garbage. Even with its 71° (!) head angle, the Tallboy will always be remembered as being one of the first 29ers on the market that was actually fun to ride. A Tallboy History Lesson As 29in wheels gained in popularity over the next few years, so too did the Tallboy. So popular in fact, that it eventually killed off Santa Cruz’ own 26in Blur. Well, at least for a while anyway… Building on the success of the original, Santa Cruz then rolled out the 2nd generation Tallboy in 2013, which kept a fairly similar recipe, but added in a 142x12mm thru-axle and gently reworked geometry. That rework included kicking the head angle back a whole 0.8° to make it 70.2° – how very slack! The OG Tallboy from back in 2009. The Tallboy was revised in 2013 with a 142x12mm back end. 2016 saw the Tallboy 3.0 with 27.5+ compatibility.     Three years later, as plus tyres became all the rage, Santa Cruz brought out Tallboy 3.0. Using Boost hub spacing and a clever flip-chip in the lower shock mount, the Tallboy introduced the ability to accommodate 27.5+ wheels for those who wanted chubby rubber. It also bumped up in travel a touch to 110mm on the rear, and offered the option to run a bigger 120-130mm fork. It was still fast and efficient, and you could still set it up as a long-haul speedster, but its slackened and lengthened geometry pushed its technical capabilities far beyond what riders had come to expect from previous iterations. And that brings us along nicely to this new bike; the 4th generation Tallboy. It says ‘Tallboy’ on the tin, but this one looks nothing like the last one. So The Santa Cruz Tallboy 4.0 – What’s Changed? Err, well, everything! Just look at it – it is absolutely nothing like the old one! Really, aside from the name, this Tallboy has very little in common with its predecessors. Much of this is because of the Blur – the 100mm travel 29er race bike that Santa Cruz re-launched last year. With the Blur snatching back its mantle as the XC/marathon speedster of the range, the Tallboy has been freed up to stretch its legs and wade deeper into the trail bike pool. It hasn’t just waded in though – the Tallboy has performed an all-mighty cannonball! Internal cable routing ports up at the head tube. The Tallboy goes 1x specific with a rigid one-piece swingarm. Note the adjustable dropouts and textured anti-slap chainstay guard. Less Tallboy, More Minitower Visually speaking, the new Tallboy bears a striking resemblance to its bigger 29er siblings; the Hightower and Megatower. Structurally speaking, the new frame is chunkier, lower and more aggressive in its stance. The Tallboy kisses goodbye 2x compatibility, with the rigid one-piece swingarm adding a vertical upright in place of where the front mech would have sat, which boosts back-end stiffness. Geometry pushes well into the future with a significantly longer front centre, a reduced fork offset, a pretty-steep 76° seat angle, and a very-slack-for-its-category 65.5° head angle. Bear in mind that’s the same head angle that the Hightower has, and only half a degree steeper than 160/160mm travel Megatower. Pwoar! There’s been a slight increase in suspension travel to 120mm on the rear, though Santa Cruz is still spec’ing the Tallboy with a 130mm travel fork. The Tallboy also sticks with 29in wheels, but it is no longer compatible with 27.5+ rubber. As with the Hightower and Megatower models, Tallboy is now 29er only, perhaps signposting that the plus tyre craze has come to an end – at least on full suspension bikes anyway. The Tallboy carries over the VPP dual-link suspension system, but the orientation is very different. The shock is now driven by the lower VPP link, and sits much lower in the frame where it anchors onto the downtube. VPP Gravity Linkage The suspension system is still a dual-link VPP design, but the shock position has changed to sit much lower down in the frame. We’ve seen this lower link-mounted shock design used on other Santa Cruz models like the Nomad, Bronson, Megatower and Hightower, but the 120mm travel Tallboy is the shortest travel frame yet to receive this new-school ‘VPP Gravity Link’ system. Instead of being mounted underneath the top tube like the old Tallboy, the shock is now anchored to the downtube, where it’s driven by the lower VPP link. This helps to lower the bike’s centre of gravity, but according to Santa Cruz it also provides a more consistent leverage ratio between the rear wheel and the shock, with a steadily progressive rate from start to finish. Speaking of leverage ratios, the Tallboy has been designed to be run specifically with an air shock, so no coils allowed here. You can fit a piggyback shock though – as long as it’s not one of those enormous Fox X2 or Cane Creek bangers. For those worried about the vulnerability of the shock position, Santa Cruz has added a neat mudguard to shield the stanchion from rear tyre spray. The world’s cutest mudguard shields the shock stanchion from rear tyre spray. The lower shock mount also encompasses a geometry flip-chip. Adjustable Geo Like the Megatower, the Tallboy offers two-way adjustable geometry. There’s a flip-chip in the lower shock mount, and that gives you both High and Low geometry settings. In the High position, the head angle sharpens to 65.7°, the seat angle steepens to 76.2°, and the BB height lifts by 3mm. Santa Cruz recommends running the bike in High first, and trying out the Low position if you’re riding particularly steep descents where pedal clearance is less of an issue. You can also adjust the chainstay length via a neat flip-chip in the rear dropout, which allows you to set the rear centre length at 430mm or 440mm. Aside from tweaking weight distribution and handling, Santa Cruz says this is useful for taller riders on bigger frames, who are able to run the longer chainstay position to provide a better balance between the front and rear wheels. The longer 440mm setting also gives a you a touch more tyre clearance, with room for up to a 29×2.6in tyre. A separate brake adapter and derailleur hanger come supplied with the frame for when you want to change the dropout position. There’s a secondary dropout flip-chip for altering the chainstay length. Other noteworthy changes in the Tallboy’s geometry include a dramatic shortening of the seat tube lengths. On a Medium size for example, the seat tube shrinks from 420mm to 405mm, which gives you an extra 15mm of clearance to run a longer dropper post. Reach has also increased substantially, with an extra 20mm or so across the size range. Speaking of sizes, the new Tallboy is available in six frame sizes from the humongous XXL, all the way down to a brand new itty-bitty XS size. That’s actually a big deal, because this new Tallboy is the first 29er that Santa Cruz has ever made in an XS size. This has mostly been made possible because of the new suspension layout, which provides more flexibility with lowering the top tube for the smaller frame sizes. Oh, and of course we’ll also see this XS size in the Juliana equivalent – the Joplin. Santa Cruz Tallboy CC 4.0 frame geometry. Are There Frame Options? Yes there are! Santa Cruz will be producing the Tallboy frameset in both CC and C carbon options. As with other Santa Cruz models, the CC version is made from a higher quality carbon fibre and so offers the same strength and stiffness as the cheaper C carbon frame, albeit with a weight drop of somewhere around 150-200g. The cheaper complete bikes will come with the C frame, and the more expensive builds will come with the CC frame. There will also be alloy frames too. They have exactly the same shape and suspension design as the carbon Tallboys, and you also get the same lifetime warranty. However, the metal Tallboys do miss out on the adjustable chainstays, and the size range is capped at S-XL. As of right now we don’t have Aussie pricing or availability on the alloy Tallboys, but we’ll be sure to update this story once that info comes through. There are both C and CC carbon frame options for the Tallboy. Alloy frames will be on offer too. What Tallboys Are Travelling To Oz? Lusty Industries, the Australian importer for Santa Cruz Bicycles, will be bringing in four complete Tallboy models that are due to arrive in mid-October. As mentioned above, there’ll only be carbon Tallboys to begin with, but we can’t imagine the metal bikes will be that much further away. The range will start with the $8,099 Tallboy C S, and end with the $14,999 Tallboy CC XX1 AXS RSV – a model we predict will be very popular with riders who hate vowels. All models get 130mm travel forks, a 2.3in Maxxis Minion DHF/DHR II tyre combo, and RockShox Reverb dropper posts. Extra picky? You’ll also be able to get the Tallboy CC frameset on its own with a Kashima-coated Fox Float Factory DPS shock for the not-inconsiderable sum of $5,499. Custom-built perfection don’t come cheap. We’ll be seeing the Tallboy C come into Australia with this SRAM GX Eagle kit. At ninety nine bucks over $8k, this is your ‘entry level’ Tallboy. Santa Cruz Tallboy C S GX Frame | Carbon C, 120mm Travel Headset | Cane Creek 40 IS Fork | Fox 34 Float, Performance Series, 130mm Travel Shock | Fox Float DPS, Performance Series, 190x45mm Wheels | DT Swiss 370 Hubs & Race Face AR Offset 27 Rims Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 3C 2.3in Front & Minion DHR II EXO 2.3in Rear Drivetrain | SRAM GX Eagle 1×12 w/Stylo 7K Crankset Brakes | SRAM Guide R w/180mm Rotors Seatpost | RockShox Reverb Stealth, 31.6mm, 1X Lever Cockpit | Race Face Ride Bars, Aeffect Stem & WTB Silverado Pro Saddle RRP | $8,099 Don’t want to fool around with spiders? The X01 kit rolls on Santa Cruz’ carbon Reserve wheels and is built upon the lighter weight CC frameset. Trick. Santa Cruz Tallboy CC X01 Frame | Carbon CC, 120mm Travel Headset | Cane Creek 40 IS Fork | RockShox Pike Select+, 130mm Travel Shock | Fox Float DPS, Performance Elite, 190x45mm Wheels | DT Swiss 350 Hubs & Race Face ARC Offset 27 Rims Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 3C 2.3in Front & Minion DHR II EXO 2.3in Rear Drivetrain | SRAM X01 Eagle 1×12 w/X1 Carbon Crankset Brakes | SRAM G2 RSC w/180mm Rotors Seatpost | RockShox Reverb Stealth, 31.6mm, 1X Lever Cockpit | Santa Cruz AM Carbon Bars, Race Face Aeffect R Stem & WTB Silverado Team Saddle RRP | $10,949   For the Shimano fans, Santa Cruz will have one solitary XTR-equipped Tallboy model coming into Australia. A RockShox Pike Ultimate fork, Chris King headset and Reserve wheels are invited to the party too. Santa Cruz Tallboy CC XTR RSV Frame | Carbon CC, 120mm Travel Headset | Chris King DropSet 3 Fork | RockShox Pike Ultimate, 130mm Travel Shock | Fox Float DPS, Factory Series, 190x45mm Wheels | Industry Nine Hydra Hubs & Santa Cruz Reserve 27 Rims Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 3C 2.3in Front & Minion DHR II EXO 2.3in Rear Drivetrain | Shimano XTR 1×12 w/E*13 TRSr Carbon Crankset Brakes | Shimano XTR M9120 w/180mm Ice Tech Centerlock Rotors Seatpost | RockShox Reverb Stealth, 31.6mm, 1X Lever Cockpit | Santa Cruz AM Carbon Bars, i9 A35 Stem & WTB Silverado Team Saddle RRP | $14,349 If one gear cable is too much for you, consider the XX1 Eagle AXS build kit, which gets a wireless rear derailleur, among other niceties like SRAM G2 RSC brakes, carbon bars and Industry Nine hubs. All for less than $15k too. Bargain! Santa Cruz Tallboy CC XX1 AXS RSV Frame | Carbon CC, 120mm Travel Headset | Chris King DropSet 3 Fork | RockShox Pike Ultimate, 130mm Travel Shock | Fox Float DPS, Factory Series, 190x45mm Wheels | Industry Nine Hydra Hubs & Santa Cruz Reserve 27 Rims Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 3C 2.3in Front & Minion DHR II EXO 2.3in Rear Drivetrain | SRAM XX1 Eagle AXS 1×12 w/XX1 Eagle Carbon Crankset Brakes | Shimano XTR M9120 w/180mm Ice Tech Centerlock Rotors Seatpost | RockShox Reverb Stealth, 31.6mm, 1X Lever Cockpit | Santa Cruz AM Carbon Bars, i9 A35 Stem & WTB Silverado Team Saddle RRP | $14,999 Low-slung and stretched out – the new Tallboy is taking its 29in wheels well into the future. We’ll be getting our paws on the new Tallboy in the near future, so stay tuned for our first impressions of this newly radicalised 29er. In the meantime, you can get more info via the Santa Cruz Bicycles website. Given all the changes, what do you think of the new 4th generation Tallboy? Does it look like it’s swung in the direction you’d hoped? Or is this one too far removed from the Tallboy we’ve previously loved so much? As always, tell us your thoughts in the comments section below! The post First Look | The New Santa Cruz Tallboy Is Basically A Minitower! appeared first on Flow Mountain Bike.

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
14 - 19/08/2019 17:34:31

Trek recently gave a total facelift to its the Fuel EX. Originally introduced in 2005, it is the brand’s staple trail bike, and remains the ideal vehicle for long days in the saddle out in the mountains. With this revision it sees updated geometry, with longer reach and a slackened head angle, making it it more in line with current trends. The key points of novelty are: the travel has now been increased to 140mm at the front by fitting a burlier Fox 36, while at the rear it remains at 130mm. The head angle is went from 67° to 66°, and the seat angle has been steepened from 74° to 75°. Correcting the geometry, the reach is now longer by 10 to 20mm, depending on the sizes. Now it is possible to fit tires up to 2.6″ (Bontrager XR4 Team Issue as stock). There is also more space for longer travel seat posts (100mm in size XS, SM, 150mm size M, and 170mm L and XL – models 9.8-9.9-). An internal compartment for storing multitool in the Specialized Swat style tube has also been introduced. To keep the contents tidy, a roll up bag from Bontrager, the Tool Roll, is supplied as standard. Also included is their bottle cage bolted to the door with a latch on the side for extraction. The rear shock still uses RE: Aktiv with Thru Shaft but it has been updated. Fox has customized the unit for Trek with a numbered ring for the Rebound, so you know exactly the position and don’t have to count the clicks. The carbon frames are now fully carbon, including the rear. The Mino Link is still present for high/steep & low/slack settings, and the Knock block on the steering tube limits the steering to avoid damage to the down tube. Cable routing is compatible for both mechanical and electronic drivetrains. The frames are only compatible with 1X drivetrains with a max chainring size of 34T. The women’s models are replaced by an expanded range of models and sizes. This is mainly because Trek realized that women don’t necessarily buy specific women’s models (sold as such), but choose mainly from other models based on value.       Pricing Fuel EX 5 -2199eu Fuel EX 7 -2769eu Fuel EX 8 -3329eu Fuel EX 9.7 -4099eu Fuel EX 9.8 GX -5499eu Fuel EX 9.9 XO1 -7499eu Fuel EX 9.9 X01 AXS -9099eu The frames will also be customizable via ProjectOne Trek site

Posted by
MTB-Mag
11 - 16/08/2019 21:01:06

KÜAT NV 2.0 RAMP You can see how long the NV 2.0 ramp is, and that gradual incline makes getting a 50-pound e-bike up onto the rack all but effortless.   For many of us, when it comes to transporting our e-bikes, finding a good two-bike rack that can handle the weight of an e-bike is problematic enough. Next comes the task of hefting a 50-plus-pound bike onto a rack. Not easy. For some, it’s impossible. Thankfully, the folks over at Küat have recognized the problem and have come up with a very simple solution. Their NV 2.0 steel ramp expands to nearly 6 feet and attaches via some additional hardware to their NV 2.0 ramp. THE RACK The Kuat ramp won’t do you any good if you don’t have the Küat rack it’s designed for. They sent us their NV 2.0 folding rack. It comes in a small box, very well-packed, with Ikea-like instructions. We tried to build it using only one person, but it ended up requiring two. Easy mounting in a 2-inch hitch receiver, with great controls for tightening it in so it doesn’t move around when bikes are mounted, with a locking pin that’s keyed the same as the two cable locks that mount under either bike runner. Those locks are magnetically held in, and they do tend to pop out over bumps, leaving the locks to drag on the ground. The shepherd’s hook that holds the front wheel into a very attractive tray setup (with plenty of room for drainage if you got muddy) can easily handle up to 29er wheels, and the strap on the back moves along the channel to hold the back wheel, regardless of wheelbase. The rack itself is metallic grey with orange-anodized accents. It comes with an accessory bike stand so you can work on your bike without needing to load it onto the rack. The fully expanded ramp.   You can see the channels and thumbscrews that allow the pamp to expand and contract for easy storage.   It ain’t rocket surgery! This very simple design keeps the ramp sturdy, easy to use and relatively inexpensive. THE RAMP Installing the ramp leaves you taking the end caps off the channels where the locks are and completely removing the locks and two Torx bolts (wrench included) to install a metal receiver that the ramp will hook into. This takes a few minutes each, but it’s pretty straightforward. Make sure you align that piece correctly, as there is some play to it. We found this out the hard way the first time we tried to mount the ramp; it wouldn’t fit. Loosening the bolts slightly allowed us to align it properly, and off we went. The ramp has a pair of thumbscrews that tighten into long channels, effectively letting you expand it from 32 inches to 54 inches. This makes it incredibly easy to move the weight up the inclined plane (remember this from your physics class umpteen years ago?). You might even be able to engage Walk mode if your bike has it to make it even easier. Price: $90 www.kuatonline.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com   The post Product Review: KÜAT NV 2.0 RAMP appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
31 - 16/08/2019 14:01:01

IXS have announced a new ultra-light, DH-certified full face helmet.( Photos: 5 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
25 - 16/08/2019 10:17:22

Trailcross flat-pedal shoes break new ground with Five Ten's best rubber soles, unprecedented water shedding ability, off-the bike ergonomics, and a special nod to diggers( Photos: 9, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
37 - 15/08/2019 14:17:23

Trek recently presented their brand-new Fuel EX 2020 during a launch in Northern Italy. With an array of clever features, updated geometry, new technologies and more travel, the American brand has introduced the new Fuel EX as the next evolutionary stage of the platform and promises that it will offer even more performance, fun and trail prowess. We were able to take the € 7,499 Trek Fuel EX 9.9 2020 out for a first ride on the rocky, volcanic trails of the Colli Euganei south of Padua. Trek Fuel EX 9.9 2020 | 140/130 mm | 13 kg | € 7,499 googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The first Trek Fuel EX was released in 2001 and has since become the bread and butter of the brand’s offerings. Over the years, the bike has constantly progressed in terms of wheel sizes, brakes, geometry and travel. The previous Fuel EX generation was introduced during the summer of 2016 at a launch in Canada with the words “slacker”, “longer”, “lower” and “more aggressive”. The new Fuel EX 2020 goes a step further, though has been faced with the challenge of finding the sweet spot between the cross-country Top Fuel and the enduro Remedy and Slash platforms. What’s new with the Trek Fuel EX 2020? The short answer: nearly everything! That means that the suspension, travel, geometry and spec options have all been updated, along with completely new features and details for 2020. 1. More models, but no women’s specific models for the Trek Fuel EX 2020 There will be seven different variants of the Fuel EX for 2020, but women’s specific models are no longer part of Trek’s philosophy, or rather, form an integral part of Trek’s “Awesome bikes for everyone” mantra. In 2019, Trek offered only three women’s models of the Fuel but identified a low standover height as the key criterion that influences the feeling of security as well as the ease of mounting and dismounting the bike. However, perhaps unsurprisingly, they also identified that not all the women buying Trek bikes go for a women’s specific model. In turn, Trek has consolidated its offerings and updated the Fuel EX frames, particularly in the smaller sizes, with a very low standover height (in comparison with the Specialized Stumpjumper, the Fuel EX’s standover is a full 30 mm lower for a size S). Trek no longer offers a separate range for women, signalling a new strategy that not only represents a more inclusive message for female riders, but also offers smaller riders in general a clear benefit: more spec and colour options to choose from. All seven builds will be available in eight sizes from XS to XXL: the smallest size is fitted with 27.5” wheels, the Small frame size provides the option between 27.5” and 29” wheels. From there, Trek chooses to fit 29” wheels only. 2. Full-carbon frame and the new Trek Fuel EX 2020 geometry The Trek Fuel EX 2020 comes with both an aluminium and carbon frame. The latter is reserved for the “9.” models. From this year, all carbon models will share the same full-carbon frame. In addition, the frame was also updated to provide more space for long-travel dropper posts. The XS and S frame can fit a dropper with 100 mm travel, the M and M/L frame a 150 mm dropper and the L, XL and XXL models a 170 mm dropper. Unfortunately, only the more expensive 9.8 and 9.9 models make full use of this. The more affordable models in the range come with 150 mm or 130 mm dropper posts at most. The geometry of the new Fuel EX is slacker and longer than its predecessor. The head angle has been reduced by 1° to 66°, the reach has increased by 10 to 20 mm depending on the frame size and finally, the seat tube angle has been steepened by 1° to 75° for a better position while climbing. Size XS 27,5″ S 27,5″ S 29″ M 29″ ML 29″ L 29″ XL 29″ XXL 29″ Seat tube 356 mm 395 mm 395 mm 420 mm 435 mm 450 mm 500 mm 540 mm Top tube 546 mm 568 mm 578 mm 603 mm 619 mm 634 mm 663 mm 688 mm Head tube 90 mm 100 mm 100 mm 100 mm 105 mm 105 mm 105 mm 140 mm Head angle 66° 66° 66° 66° 66° 66° 66° 66° Seat angle 75° 75° 75° 75° 75° 75° 75° 75° Chainstays 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm BB–Offset 43 mm 43 mm 43 mm 43 mm 43 mm 43 mm 43 mm 43 mm Wheelbase 1.120 mm 1.144 mm 1.154 mm 1.179 mm 1.196 mm 1.211 mm 1.242 mm 1.270 mm Reach 395 mm 415 mm 415 mm 440 mm 455 mm 470 mm 495 mm 515 mm Stack 563 mm 572 mm 608 mm 608 mm 613 mm 613 mm 627 mm 645 mm 3. Suspension: more travel, easier setup and no Full Floater All Trek Fuel EX 2020 models have 140 mm travel up front, compared with the previous 130 mm. The rear keeps the same 130 mm travel. The more expensive 9.8 and 9.9 models now also come fitted with a FOX 36 instead of FOX 34 fork, promising more precision and performance on the trails. Trek have relied on their proprietary Full Floater suspension design for around 10 years. This saw the shock “floating” between two pivots which in turn was claimed to offer an optimal balance between pedalling efficiency and a bottomless feel. That comes to an end here! Just like the Trek Session, Slash and Remedy, Trek now replace the Full Floater design on the Fuel EX 2020 with a fixed lower shock mount by the bottom bracket. Why? New technology has closed the gap on suspension performance and the simpler shock mount provides improved tire clearance and allows higher frame stiffness (according to Trek around 20%). The Trek exclusive FOX Float EVOL RE:aktiv inline shock with Thru Shaft damper promises maximum control and traction in rough terrain. While classic shocks pressurise oil in an internal chamber to compensate for the decreased volume caused by the piston’s compression, Thru Shaft allows the piston to move through the shock. The absence of pressure reduces the breakaway torque and leads to a more sensitive response. In addition, the updated shock has a seemingly trivial but helpful feature: a numbered rebound dial which should make for significantly simpler setup. 4. Trek Internal Frame Storage: stowage in the Trek Fuel EX 2020’s down tube Similar to Specialized, Trek now provides space in the down tube for you to stow tools and spares. A bottle cage is mounted on the cover of the compartment, which can be removed using a mechanical closure. According to Trek, this system adds minimal extra weight and its implementation has been managed successfully and neatly. However, the space inside is rather limited and at most you’ll be able to fit a spare tube, CO2 cartridge and tyre lever in the Bontrager BITS tool roll. Unfortunately, there’s no space to fit a beer or sandwich ;) document.createElement('video'); http://enduro-mtb.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/IMG_7928.mp4 5. Lifetime warranty, more details and additional highlights of the Trek Fuel EX 2020 Trek offers a lifetime warranty on both its aluminium and carbon frames. In comparison to some of its competitors, this isn’t just a piece of paper. Trek promise to react quickly and personally if any issues do arise. Trek know that there’s nothing more frustrating than a long-winded warranty claim in the middle of prime riding season. The new Trek Fuel EX 2020 is designed exclusively for 1x drivetrains, with no option to mount a front derailleur. More tire clearance: the Trek Fuel EX 2020 can fit up to 29×2.6” tires. Trek’s ABP (Active Braking Pivot) is a classic feature of Trek full suspension bikes and is designed to keep the suspension active under braking. The Mino Link at the rear allows the angles to be adjusted by 0.5°, allowing it to be tuned for better downhill or uphill performance. The bike comes as standard in the high position. Inevitably, we ended up riding it in the low position for better downhill performance! The Knock Block steering limiter in the headset ensures that the fork crown or shifter can’t damage the down- or top tube if you crash. “Control Freak” is the name Trek gives its cable routing system which allows any cabling configurations (Shimano Di2 as well) to be fixed and routed without any rattling. Of course, if you’ve got SRAM Eagle AXS, you don’t need to route anything at all. 6.Trek Fuel EX 9.9 2020 weight Das von uns getestete Trek Fuel EX 9.9 2020 wiegt in Größe M/L exakt 13,0 kg. Im Vergleich zum Vorgängermodell, das wir in Größe L im Dauertest hatten (11,90 kg) ist das neue Fuel EX über 1 kg schwerer geworden. Die Hauptursachen dafür sind die FOX 36 Federgabel und die dickeren Bontrager Reifen. Trek Fuel EX 2020 models, pricing and spec As mentioned, Trek offer the Fuel EX in seven different builds priced between € 2,099 and € 9,099 (pricing might differ depending on location) with three aluminium and four carbon frames. The latter are all denoted by the “9.” in their model name. Trek Fuel EX 5 – € 2,099 Entry into the range comes via the Trek Fuel EX 5 with a RockShox Recon RL fork and a standard Deluxe Select Plus shock without RE:aktiv or Thru Shaft technology, Shimano MT200 brakes and a 10-speed Deore drivetrain with an 11-42 t cassette that results in noticeably less gear range than all other Fuel EX models. You’ll have to accept further compromise on the dropper post which has only 130 mm travel. However, the choice to spec the same tires as the top model is commendable! Trek Fuel EX 7 – € 2,699 The € 2,699 Trek Fuel EX 7 is fitted with a RockShox 35 Gold fork and FOX Float DPS Performance shock, though this doesn’t feature Trek’s RE:aktiv or Thru Shaft technology either. Thanks to the 12-speed SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain you have a wide gear range on offer. This model also upgrades to Bontrager Line Comp 30 wheels and Shimano MT400 2-piston brakes. However, the dropper still only provides 130 mm travel. Trek Fuel EX 8 – € 3,199 From the Trek Fuel EX 8 onwards, you’ll get FOX suspension with RE:aktiv, but no Thru Shaft technology, which only appears from the Fuel EX 9.8 and up. The € 3,199 Fuel EX 8 is fitted with Shimano Deore 2-piston brakes and a 12-speed SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain. The dropper post has up to 150 mm travel (depending on the frame size). Trek Fuel EX 9.7 – € 3,899 The Trek Fuel EX 9.7 marks the first carbon model in the range and cost € 3,899. For that, you’ll get a FOX 34 Rhythm fork and a FOX Float Performance shock with RE:aktiv damping along with a 12-speed SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain and Shimano MT420 4-piston brakes. The carbon frame means this is also the first model to feature Trek’s Internal Frame Storage. Trek Fuel EX 9.8 – € 5,499 From the Fuel EX 9.8 onwards, Trek equip the bikes with a FOX 36 up front. The 12-speed SRAM GX Eagle, 170 mm travel dropper post and Fox Float Performance RE:aktiv shock with Thru Shaft technology really help the full potential of the Fuel EX platform to unfold. In addition, this € 5,499 model features carbon instead of aluminium wheels. Trek Fuel EX 9.9 – € 7,499/€ 9,099 (AXS) Equipped with FOX Factory suspension, Shimano XT 4-piston brakes and SRAM X01 Eagle gearing, the Fuel EX 9.9 we tested offers top-end performance but requires you to hand over a princely € 7,499 at the shop. If that’s not enough, then for € 9,099 you can get your hands on the Fuel EX 9.9 AXS with a wireless SRAM X01 Eagle AXS drivetrain as well as a wireless RockShox Reverb AXS dropper post with up to 170 mm travel. The bling-bling benefit is a super clean cockpit with just two hoses left solely for your brakes. And if that’s still not enough, then you can run riot with the Project One customisation programme! googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); First ride review of the Fuel EX 9.9 2020 Comfortable from the get-go! Thanks to its central position, the Trek Fuel EX 9.9 immediately makes you feel at home. With its 13 kg for a size M/L, the bike might have become significantly heavier, but it’s everything but sluggish. It efficiently scampers up the hills without perceptible suspension bob. It’s particularly on steeper slopes where you notice the effect of the steepened seat tube angle, which allows you to keep enough pressure on the front wheel to stop it from lifting. Fork FOX Factory 36 Float EVOL Grip 2 140 mm Shock Fox Factory Float EVOL 140 mm Brakes Shimano XT Drivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle Seatpost Bontrager Line Elite Dropper 170 mm Stem Bontrager Line Pro 35 mm Handlebar Bontrager Line Pro WheelsBontrager Line Carbon 30, Tubeless Ready Tires Bontrager XR4 Team Issue 2,6″ Weight 13.00 kg Price € 7,499 On the downhills, the Fuel EX 9.9 2020 tracks the ground, with the suspension offering well-defined feedback and support while remaining supple and smooth. On small edges and roots, the bike encourages a playful and agile riding style. On larger jumps, the Trek is hard to unsettle: the bike convinced us with stable and precise handling in the air. In comparison with the old Fuel EX 9.9 the front end has noticeably improved precision thanks to the FOX 36 fork, without becoming too stiff or harsh. In turn, the bike also forgives the occasional poor line choice and plows its way happily through challenging terrain, maintaining traction throughout. While the Bontrager BITS tool roll doesn’t rattle at all in the down tube, we did notice some chain slap on our test bike on rougher ground. Closer examination of the chainstays makes it clear why: in the highest gear, there are just a few millimetres of space between the chain and chainstay guard. Shift to an easier gear and the clearance is much more acceptable. However, we do have to ask why there is no asymmetrical or dropped drive-side stay to address this. There’s some more criticism in store for the travel of the dropper post. Even if it has more travel than its predecessor and 150 mm travel is enough for most situations, we would still like to see a longer dropper post to make better use of the low standover height of the bike. The Bontrager XR4 Team Issue tires in 29×2.6” rolled quickly on the harder terrain of the flowy berms and jumps of our test trails. They even handled looser, more dusty ground and open corners admirably. The Shimano XT four-pot brakes with a 200 mm rotor up front and 180 mm at the back were similarly capable – depending on where you ride and your weight, we might recommend a 200 mm rotor at the back as well though. Conclusion Conclusion: the Trek Fuel EX 2020 is an absolute trail rocket and thanks to its burlier components, increased travel and more aggressive geometry it’s become more shredder than ever! New features such as the Internal Frame Storage are well executed and allow you to easily have an emergency repair kit with you at all times. We didn’t like the rattling chain and the shorter travel of the dropper post, but overall, Trek have done an excellent job with the Fuel EX 2020 and stayed true to their promise of more performance, fun and trail prowess and accordingly true to the motto of longer, faster, better! Oh, and have you seen the Project One paint jobs yet? #bikeporn For more info head to: trekbikes.com

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Enduro MTB - RSS
40 - 15/08/2019 14:01:00

Trek's trail bike gets an all-new frame with tweaked suspension and fresh geometry, but where does sit compared to the competition?( Photos: 32 )

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Pinkbike