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14pts - 10 hours ago

The Reactor feels like a bike with classic, old school all-mountain intentions, constructe...

Posted by
Bike Mag
6pts - 28/01/2020 08:34:14

Kneepads: yes or no? Those who opt against wearing knee pads usually do so because...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
12pts - 28/01/2020 08:17:15

Space-age polyethylene spokes that look like string? Atomik's XC33 wheels with Be...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 28/01/2020 08:17:15

The new Top Fuel is still very much an XC machine. It's also damn fun and vastly more vers...

Posted by
Bike Mag
10pts - 27/01/2020 22:34:14

Intense Tazer Action Phot...

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
8pts - 27/01/2020 17:00:54

SRAM and RockShox made waves in the mountain bike industry when they announced their AXS w...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
5pts - 27/01/2020 17:00:53

The Marzocchi Bomber Z2 is a solid performer for folks on a budget and riders who want a s...

Posted by
Bike Mag
10pts - 27/01/2020 14:51:17

The Marzocchi Bomber Z2 is a solid performer for folks on a budget and riders who want a s...

Posted by
Bike Mag
8pts - 27/01/2020 08:17:14

The new Process 134 29 is a modern trail bike with a voracious appetite for tight...

Posted by
Pinkbike
13pts - 24/01/2020 08:17:14

The Ripmo AF is not a watered-down Ripmo, and it definitely delivers Ripmo performance, al...

Posted by
Bike Mag

Latest Photos

0pts
3 hours ago
14 - 10 hours ago

The Reactor feels like a bike with classic, old school all-mountain intentions, constructed with the colloquialisms of the contemporary mountain bike. The post Tested: Nukeproof Reactor 290C Elite appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
6 - 28/01/2020 08:34:14

Kneepads: yes or no? Those who opt against wearing knee pads usually do so because the pads are heavy, impede pedalling and get sweaty and damp. However, If you don’t like the idea of leaving your delicate knees exposed then light pads could be an option. The Amplifi MKX Knee pads weigh just 260 grams in size L and can be pulled on like a sock. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Manne isn’t the typical knee pad wearer given that he very rarely rides in bike parks but he still finds himself in a lot of scenarios where knee pads could make sense. This is where the Amplifi MKX Knee pads come into play since they’re comfortable enough to wear on long rides and keep wearing on the climbs. Thanks to their seamless, 3D-knitted mesh they’re about as thin and flexible as a pair of warm socks, with no zips or velcro straps to cause any friction. The 3D-knitted manufacturing process gives the Amplifi MKX Knee pads their comfortable sock-like fit, quickly letting you forget that you’re wearing pads at all. However, some riders might get annoyed by the mesh wrinkling at the back of the knees when pedalling. The silicone dots on the inside of the hem reduce slippage but don’t completely prevent the pads from moving out of position. Since there are no Velcro straps, it’s vital to get the correct size for the optimal fit and to prevent slippage. The Amplifi MKX Knee complies with the EN1621-1 standard, but due to their lightweight construction, they don’t provide the protection you’d get with a heavy-duty knee pad. The Amplifi MKX Knee pads are a lightweight and comfortable alternative for everyday use outside the bike park. They pack down very small and can easily fit in the smallest backpack. The workmanship is good and they should last a long time, but the best part is that the Amplifi MKX Knee pads are so inconspicuous that you quickly forget you’re wearing them. Topslight and flexiblecomfortable fitcan be worn unobtrusively under your trousersFlopsmesh wrinkles at the back of the knee Tester: Manne Duration: 12 months Price: € 79.99 Weight: 264 g (size L) More info: amplifisports.com Der Beitrag AMPLIFI MKX Knee in review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
12 - 28/01/2020 08:17:15

Space-age polyethylene spokes that look like string? Atomik's XC33 wheels with Berd spokes are a different take on how to build a wheel.( Photos: 9, Comments: 10 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
2 - 28/01/2020 08:17:15

The new Top Fuel is still very much an XC machine. It's also damn fun and vastly more versatile than we expected. The post Bible Review: Trek Top Fuel 9.9 appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
10 - 27/01/2020 22:34:14

Intense Tazer Action Photos: Pat Carrigan When the history books of pioneer mountain bike design and downhill racing are written, there is no doubt that there will be several chapters dedicated to the decades-long relationship that Intense Cycles has with crafting championship-winning bikes. Ever since the first Intense showed up at the races back in 1993, if there is one thing that separated company founder Jeff Steber’s effort from the crowd, it’s been his willingness to design and build high-performance bikes from the ground up. When it came time to design their first e-bike, Jeff was not willing to just slap a motor into just any existing frame sourced from Asia. No, they started experimenting. They made the first three prototypes in aluminum before moving to carbon. In taking a tour of their Temecula, California-based factory, we saw a prototyping room where a detailed process helps them dial in the geometry and suspension kinematics. While mountain bike historians would be correct in pointing out that Intense had a non-assist hardtail mountain bike (now discontinued) by this same name years ago, Jeff decided that it was a more appropriate name for a new full-suspension e-MTB bike, so back the name came. Intense worked around the battery to have room in the front triangle for a bottle cage while still maintaining the suspension setup they wanted. THE BIKE From the sloping top tube to the box-section chainstays, the carbon frame is a thing of beauty, and it is aided and abetted in trickness by the Fox Factory e-bike-specific suspension. The original colorway for this bike matched that of its namesake stun gun, the Taser. It came in yellow/silver. For 2020 it’s available in black/silver. THE PARTS This bike was designed around a staggered set of wheel sizes, with a 29-inch front wheel mounted to a 27.5-inch rear, both mounted with Maxxis Minion tires. The advantage here is that the 29er front wheel rolls over obstacles better and is more precise, and the 27.5-inch tire offers a wider contact patch for better traction both in pedaling and braking. Wheels are DT Swiss H1700, and the front 29er features a 30mm inner width, and the rear 27.5-inch is 35mm wide to allow for the plus-sized tire. There is a lot of travel in the Fox Factory Series Transfer dropper post, as in 150mm.   The suspension is courtesy of Fox 36 Float fork with 160mm of travel, with the rear duties capably handled by a trunnion-mount Fox Factory Float DPX2 shock with a three-position lever and 150mm of travel. Intense opted for a long-travel Fox Factory Series Transfer dropper post, which offers one of the widest ranges of seat-height changes we’ve yet ridden. To keep pedal strikes at bay, they use a Shimano XT 165mm crank. THE MOTOR The Tazer uses a Shimano STEPS E8000 motor. It’s small, quiet and packs a serious punch in the top levels. It’s protected by a metal skid plate underneath to protect it from rock and log strikes. Interestingly, they mounted an external battery internally. Intense isn’t the first company to do this, and there are some advantages and disadvantages inherent to the idea. First off, the down tube is massive. There’s a cover on the side that you must remove to not only remove the battery (if you ever do), but for the daily task of charging the battery. There’s no external port for this. This configuration does offer some weight savings over the internal batteries with all of their support hardware. “If there is one thing that separated company founder Jeff Steber’s effort from the crowd, it’s been his willingness to design and build high-performance bikes from the ground up.” The battery is also mounted upside down, and the reason for this was twofold: First, it lowers the bike’s center of gravity for better stability. Second, it allows Intense to engineer the front triangle to hold an optional water bottle cage for riders who prefer carrying water that way. An external battery is inserted inverted internally. The battery cover has to be removed to charge the bike.   Battery capacity is a solid 504 Wh, allowing for long rides with little “range anxiety.” It’s mounted to make it lockable or removable without keys for those who want to carry an extra battery and swap it out on long rides. The feature-filled Shimano STEPS display is small and mounted behind the bars and almost completely protected in case of a crash. It shows mode, power use, battery and one other item of the rider’s choice, such as range, cadence, etc. Some mountain bikes add Di2 shifting with a manual shift lever to also control the power mode. Possibly to keep costs down, Intense instead went with a Shimano SLX mechanical setup and used a STEPS controller for mode control. WHO IT’S MADE FOR The Tazer is aimed squarely at experienced off-road riders who want an e-bike with great geometry and suspension. It’s also a good way for experienced moto riders to get into mountain biking. THE RIDE Powering up the bike is done with a silicone-protected button located on the downtube. Remember how the battery is mounted upside down inside the downtube? That means you’re simply pressing a protected button on the battery itself. After you press it, you can’t move the bike or touch the pedals until the motor system has fully started up and zeroed out the torque sensor, lest you get the dreaded “W13” error from the E8000 system. The first thing you notice when you take off is that the bike doesn’t feel heavy. At 48.5 pounds, it’s heavier than some we’ve tested, but still lighter than many other bikes aimed for this category. The medium we had actually fit some of our riders who normally like a large. It seems to cover a lot of people with only three sizes. Shimano 4-piston disc brakes proved very effective at keeping things from getting out of hand.   The suspension felt really great, really plush, with ample progression in the stroke. We never bottomed out. The ride was lively, and the 64.9-degree head angle was forgiving when we’d be a little too aggressive into a technical section. The staggered wheels really work well. We rolled over obstacles we’d normally pull up over, and the back wheels have tons of traction, making controlling speed easy and keeping the rear wheel biting on fast corners. We loved the power of the quad-piston Shimano XT brakes, and there were a couple of times they kept us out of trouble when the plush suspension drew us into corners faster than we liked. Steering is precise, and the bike responds well to rider inputs, whether that’s steering, weight shifts or lifting the front wheel. Even bunnyhops are surprisingly easier than you’d think with an e-MTB. POWER All motors have a preferred cadence. The STEPS is no different, providing the best power in any combination of gearing and power mode at 80–90 rpm. There are three modes: The first is Eco, and it provides just enough support to compensate for the weight of the bike. The second is called Trail, and the third is called Boost, which gives you a neck-snapping 90 N/m of torque. It’s almost too much. We always ride the bikes with stock programming first. Then, we tweak them. Shimano has an app called eTube that allows you to customize the power levels. We left Eco and Boost where they were, but bumped Trail up a notch or two (you can do this in the field) to make it a more usable mode. From there, we kept it in Trail almost 90 percent of the time. The Tazer comes with a nicely boxed kit with all kinds of goodies—from tools to a shock pump to all the different guides for the bike, the motor, etc.   Climbing was made easy, and the Tazer made its way up the steepest trails we could throw at it. Despite the short rear end, it didn’t have a tendency to loop out. They nailed the bottom bracket height as we rarely spiked a pedal. THE VERDICT The Tazer is a lot of bike for the money. The geometry is nimble yet forgiving. The way this bike is set up makes for a confident rider over everything—dirt, rocks, logs, singletrack. It takes it all in stride. Without a doubt, the Tazer is definitely aimed at the more experienced, hardcore rider, but thanks to the handling and suspension, it is also a bike that would be the perfect tool for the less experienced rider to get better. SPECS INTENSE TAZER Price: $7590 Motor: Shimano StEPS E8000, 250W Battery: Shimano STEPS E8010, 504 Wh Charge time: 4–5 hours Top speed: 20 mph Range: 20–40 miles Drive: Shimano SLX, 11-42, 11-speed Brakes: Shimano XT 4-piston hydraulic discs, 203mm (front and rear) Controls: Shimano STEPS Fork: Fox Factory e-bike 36 Float, Kashima, 160 mm, Fit Grip2, 15QRx110 BOOST, 51mm Offset Rear shock: Fox Factory Float DPX2, Trunnion Mount, EVOL, 3-position Lever 185x55mm Frame: Tazer Optimized Carbon 29” Front and 275+ Rear Triangle, Enduro link Pivot System, Downtube Flak Guard Armor, Internal Derailleur, Brake, Dropper Post, and Display Unit Routing, ISCG 05 Mount, 150mm travel. Tires: 29X2.60, Minion DHR II front, 27.5X2.8, Minion DHR II rear Weight: 48.5 lb. (medium without pedals) Color choice: Silver/black Sizes: S, M, L www.intensecycles.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Bike Review: Intense Tazer appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
8 - 27/01/2020 17:00:54

SRAM and RockShox made waves in the mountain bike industry when they announced their AXS wireless systems last Spring. Specifically, on the RockShox end of things, this involved the abandonment of a cable (or hose) to activate their Reverb AXS dropper seatposts, with a simple but customizable wireless controller taking its place. A while after the launch, I began long term testing one of the nifty new posts on a personal bike to see how it would fare in the long run… Details Travel: 100mm, 125mm, 150mm, 170mm Length: 340mm, 390mm, 440mm, 480mm 30.9mm, 31.6 & 34.9 diameters 676 grams claimed without battery – 732 grams on our scale with battery and controller Wireless actuation “Vent valve” for simple resets and service $800.00 While the Reverb AXS manages to keep its overall length down pretty nicely across the lineup, it appears to be slightly on the heavier side. However, it’s worth keeping in mind the weight of a cable, hose and lever so as not to compare apples to oranges. Once those are factors are considered, things come out in the wash and the weight is pretty middle of the road with some offerings being a few grams lighter and some a few grams heavier. Pictured above is the controller and the seatpost head. Left: pressing the RockShox branded plastic paddle immediately activates the seatpost. Although it ships with its own handlebar clamp, it is Matchmaker compatible and features two inboard/outboard positions. Right: the head has a button (for pairing) and a light, which indicates activation and battery levels via different colors (green and red). Call me a luddite, but one of the features I was most impressed by on the Reverb AXS is the tilt function. Rail adjustments as well as saddle installation and removal is blazing fast with a single bolt and a few turns. The tilt screw is nice for fine tuning and is equally quick and efficient with a full turn of the T25 screw moving the saddle angle quite a bit. One thing I appreciated about this was that the tilt is set it and forget it – meaning you can take your seat on and off and you won’t have to go through the process of getting the angle “just right” as it will be right where you left it, unlike seatpost clamps which use fore/aft hardware. Just like with Eagle AXS, the controller uses a CR2032 battery, which is typically available at your average pharmacy or hardware store. According to SRAM, that battery is good for roughly two years of use and will indicate that it is low on juice with its light. On the seatpost itself, the SRAM/RockShox specific battery is the same across the board for all of their wireless products and weighs just 25 grams. On the trail Starting with installation, it’s almost difficult to overstate how unbelievably satisfying it is to rip the cable out of your frame and kiss it goodbye. The removal of your old post will undoubtedly take longer than the installation of the Reverb AXS. Setup and pairing on SRAM’s smartphone app is quick, intuitive and seamless. It should go without saying – but just to spell it out, you don’t need your phone to use the seatpost day-to-day. As I am long in the limb, I was happy to test the longest travel 170mm version, which comes in at a relatively short 480mm overall length. For what it’s worth, I couldn’t lower the 175mm Fox Transfer seatpost quite far enough on my Evil Offering, so this was a welcome change. As far as ergonomics are concerned, despite looking rather simple with its flat shape, I got along with the controller’s paddle quite well. The fact that it just requires a quick tap is nice – compared to the longer throw required by a standard mechanical post. In fact I got quite spoiled by that and found going back to a normal lever to be rather annoying. Speaking of quick taps, something I came to be quite fond of was the fact that under weight, briefly hitting the controller rapidly opens and closes the valve in the seatpost, which lowers it just a few millimeters. This was really nice in scenarios where I’d be climbing with the seat topped out, then upon getting into the meat of a technical climb, a blip of the controller would give me just a bit more room to better navigate the undulations of said tricky section. On the Reverb AXS this process of getting the seat just slightly more “out of the way” was far less distracting than on a mechanical seatpost, where you have to finesse the lever. This seamless process allowed for greater concentration on what matters – the trail ahead. As far as return speed goes, I think RockShox has hit the nail on the head…The seat comes back rather quickly, but not so fast that it slams you where the sun doesn’t shine. Full extension is met with a clear and audible, but pleasant sounding top out. As far as battery life is concerned, as I’ve been using the Reverb AXS in conjunction with an AXS drivetrain and have been charging both system’s batteries together roughly every 2-3 weeks and have yet to run into any problems. SRAM claim a 20 hour ride time for the derailleur battery which, in my experience, tends to indicate it’s going low well before the seatpost, so take that for what it’s worth. Lastly, while I haven’t had to put it to use yet, it’s reassuring to know that you can perform a quick purge of the air and oil in the internals with “Vent Valve”. It’s not quite as easily accessible as the reset lever on the BikeYoke Revive seatpost, but unlike the Revive, I haven’t actually even needed to use it, despite months of constant use and abuse. Overall All in all it’s difficult to find any real flaw in the RockShox Reverb AXS, save the price. In simple terms, it does cost roughly three times the average dropper seatpost – but then again, it most certainly is not your average post. Personally, I think it’s vastly superior to everything else on the market, but I’m not going to tell you how to spend your money. Unlike splurges such as titanium springs, the performance is actually there to back up the price tag. If you’re an aesthete with a fondness for a clean cockpit and low maintenance, there could be room on your bike for one of these seatposts. There is certainly a great deal of innovation to be found here – even where you least expect it, in places such as the clamp, which is far easier to use and adjust compared to its competitors. At the end of the day, Reverb AXS is pricey but it’s also perfect. www.rockshox.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
5 - 27/01/2020 17:00:53

The Marzocchi Bomber Z2 is a solid performer for folks on a budget and riders who want a simple set-and-forget fork. The post Tested: Marzocchi Bomber Z2 | $500 appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
10 - 27/01/2020 14:51:17

The Marzocchi Bomber Z2 is a solid performer for folks on a budget and riders who want a simple set-and-forget fork. The post Tested: Marzocchi Bomber Z2 | $500 appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
8 - 27/01/2020 08:17:14

The new Process 134 29 is a modern trail bike with a voracious appetite for tight turns.( Photos: 19 )

Posted by
Pinkbike