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14pts - 25/10/2020 13:00:45

In April, ENVE announced an all new wheelset that served as the seminal departure from man...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
20pts - 23/10/2020 09:17:13

Part 2 of our custom Pivot Cycles Phoenix 29 carbon downhill bike build continu...

Posted by
Sickline
62pts - 22/10/2020 14:17:13

Come on, how sexy is this bike?! Not only does the brand new Orbea Rise sport a ve...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
34pts - 22/10/2020 11:00:44

The Escarpe and Sommet get completely updated for 2021 while still remaining very...

Posted by
Pinkbike
40pts - 21/10/2020 07:17:11

An in-depth analysis of Shimano's newest motor.( Photos: 18, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
10pts - 16/10/2020 21:00:59

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The Bike Dads - RSS
8pts - 15/10/2020 07:17:16

Ever tried to bleed a derailleur?( Photos: 10, Comments: 5 )

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Pinkbike
4pts - 14/10/2020 15:00:46

It’s been well over a decade since we last saw it, but the Norco Shore is finally ba...

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FlowMountainBike
2pts - 13/10/2020 16:00:41

There's been a BIG change, even if the newest Stumpy doesn't look all that differ...

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Pinkbike
2pts - 12/10/2020 21:17:15

Here’s our short video review of the long-ran...

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Electric Bike Action

Latest Photos

14 - 25/10/2020 13:00:45

In April, ENVE announced an all new wheelset that served as the seminal departure from many of the brand’s norms – namely external nipples a new rim profile and lower pricing. Dubbed the AM30, the new wheelset is aimed at a broad range of trail bikes, from “110mm to 180mm travel” according to ENVE. As part of a new line of more accessibly priced wheelsets from their new “Foundation Collection”, the wheels are still fully made in the US and continue to boast an impressive warranty. We’ve been riding them on a wide variety of terrain on a couple of different bikes over the past few months and are happy to report on them below… Details 27.5″ & 29″ Industry Nine 1/1 hubs XD, HG and Microspline drivers Centerlock only for Boost rear hubs / 6 – bolt for Superboost 30mm internal rim width Handmade in the US 28 hole front and rear Sapim Race spokes laced two cross 1852 grams complete – verified at 1876 grams with tape and valves $1,600 USD Lifetime Incident Protection and 5 Year Factory Warranty As you can see in the picture above, the rim’s profile isn’t nearly as deep as we’re used to seeing from the Utah based brand. While the stout AM30 rim is still a broad 39mm wide, it’s now just 20mm deep. For comparison’s sake, the roughly similar – at least duty wise anyway – M730 is 27mm deep. More on how that affects riding quality later… With the M series rims from ENVE, the nipples are internal, hidden between the two rim walls. Despite the fact that it’s something you rarely need to do with carbon wheels in general, this did mean that truing them required removing the tire and rim strip. This is no longer the case with the AM30’s thanks to their external nipples. Shown in the picture above is the 3mm offset, which applies to both rims, but another big part of the story is ENVE’s molded spoke hole concept, which is their new, patented approach to increasing strength at the areas where the spokes penetrate the rim… As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words, and the above diagram, plus a few of ENVE’s words should help demystify any fogginess around the molded spoke hole concept. At the heart of the AM30 wheelset is Industry Nine’s excellent 1/1 hubs. I’ve ridden them on a handful of wheelsets over the years and found them to be fantastic all the way around – nicely made, fast engagement, easy to maintain. Inside the hub shell is a 45 tooth drive ring. The rear hub can be pulled apart by hand and rebuilt without any special tools other than a rag and some grease. A dual phased drive mechanism with six pawls mates to the 45 tooth drive ring for 90 points of engagement, which correlates to every 4º. A somewhat limiting factor with the AM30’s is that with the exception of the Superboost spacing wheelset, they’re only available with a Centerlock rotor interface. Although I tend to prefer the 6-bolt mount and I have SRAM Code brakes on the bike I tested these wheels on, I simply snagged some Centerlines with the Centerlock interface – problem solved. On the trail Starting out with feel, I noticed a perceptible increase in how well the AM30 hoops dampened low frequency chatter compared to the M730, which I noted as being a bit on the harsh side when I reviewed them. All in all, I’d argue that they felt just as rigid in the corners as the M730, just less harsh vertically. With that in mind, if you’re after a rim along the lines of the Zipp 3ZeroMoto, or the crankbrothers Synthesis whose main claim is their compliance, these aren’t it. More precisely, they handle far better than the 3ZeroMoto, and aren’t quite as forgiving as the Synthesis, but are substantially stiffer than both side to side. An interesting approach that ENVE took with the AM30 was to ditch the rim strip – which doubled as flat protection – from the M-series rims. To make up for this, they made the sides of the rims substantially thicker, so they’re less apt to be able to cut through a tire upon impact, thus reducing the likelihood of flats through smart design. Although it’s a pretty straightforward idea all around, in marketing speak ENVE calls this concept “Wide Hookless Bead”. In terms of when the rubber hit the dirt, I can’t knock its effectiveness as I have yet to flat with this wheelset despite absolutely slamming them on many many occasions. One would think that the increased material in that area has got to help with their overall impact strength a great deal as well. Overall, the rims are very burly, and you can push them a lot harder than you’d expect with something bearing an “All Mountain” label. In terms of weight, coming in just shy of 1,900 grams the AM30 wheelset isn’t necessarily featherweight, but they also aren’t so heavy that you’re left scratching your head and wondering why you shelled out a decent chunk of change for carbon wheels. Rather, they’re pretty middle of the road and what you are paying for is the handling, strength and warranty backing from ENVE. As far as the hubs were concerned, I found the 1/1’s lefft nothing at all to complain about. The engagement is as fast as anyone really needs, although they aren’t as quick as I9’s almost over the top Hydra hubs. In any case, toward the tail end of my test period I pulled the cassette off and simply gave the driver body a tug. This allows easy access to the drive ring and pawls, which were still well lubricated and managing to stave off grime via the one main seal, which is rather sturdy by the way. Anyhow, after a quick 5 minute clean and repack it was back to riding with plenty of life left. Between that and newfound spoke access, they boast easy upkeep. Overall In the grand scheme of things, I feel that ENVE has made a very solid case with the AM30 wheelset. They’ve fielded some past criticism for not only being pricey, but also because some of their past products may not have pulled their weight given the cost. At $1,600 complete, I think these wheels hit the mark in terms of the always important value metric. Sure, some budget offerings from the bigger OEM brands like Roval and Bontrager come in at a nominally lower cost, but those wheelsets aren’t made in the USA, nor do they feature boutique level hubs. I also doubt that either are quite as strong as these wheels, and I know for certain that they don’t have quite as refined of a feel. Other than that, setting value aside for a moment, what impressed me most was the strength, ride quality and on trail feel the AM30’s offered up. The only minor setback I can conjure up is the fact that some consumers may be alienated by a Centerlock rotor interface. Other than that, they’re a damn good set of American made wheels at a good price with great backing. www.enve.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
20 - 23/10/2020 09:17:13

Part 2 of our custom Pivot Cycles Phoenix 29 carbon downhill bike build continues today as we walk you through the custom build. In Part 1 of our Pivot Cycles Phoenix 29 build, we covered a lot of intricate details on the frameset so be sure to check that out first if you haven’t yet. Pivot Cycles Phoenix 29 Complete Build Today we’re covering the full build in the second installment. Now that you’ve seen the complete build picture above we’ll walk you through the details of our build. It’s fun to pick and choose each part that goes on a custom bike build and this one was no different. We always love picking quality components for our custom builds and this one is no exception. Starting with a clean 2020 FOX 49 fork, we removed the stock orange stickers and put on some red ones to match the bike’s decals better. FOX has an updated lineup for 2021 but we started this build before that was available so be sure to check those out if you’re in the market for a new fork. The FOX 40 offers great stability and suspension performance through their damper system. The adjustability range is wide and we always enjoy our time on this reliable FOX fork. Using a heat gun we loosened up the stickers to make sure they come off easily. You could use a blow dryer as well here or just peel them off but we find a little heat helps them come off cleanly. FOX sells a variety of color options and you’d be hard-pressed to not find a color you like. After applying a little bit of heat they’re easy to pull off. Applying the new decals is the last step. For the drivetrain and brakes, we went with a Shimano Saint set up with some Race Face SixC cranks. Tons of power and reliability from the Saint drivetrain and braking system. It’s crazy to think Shimano released these components back in 2012 when 27.5″ wheels weren’t even a thing yet, let alone 29er downhill bikes really … and Saint still rocks solid today. The brakes come with pre-bled lines but it’s always a good idea to do a quick bleed after cutting and installing the lines. Routing the cables inside the frame was pretty easy, especially the front triangle. The rear triangle comes with a guide already installed to help fish the derailleur through. On the rear brake side, we used a Park Tool internal routing kit to get that one a little easier along with a pick to grab the line. Overall it is super clean once it’s all done. We’ve used the Race Face SixC cranks on some bikes dating as far back as 2014 and they’re very lightweight but sturdy in our experience. The booties help keep the ends of the cranks clean from impacts too and their solid CINCH system works great. The enduro pedal dummy helps get everything dialed in on the stand. The bottom bracket presses in and with a carbon frame it’s always good to have some carbon grease handy as well. The bottom bracket works well enough but we’d like it if there were better sealing fitment in-between the bottom bracket components to help keep water and debris out even better. In addition to the cranks, we also tried out the Race Face Getta Grips which are a little fatter than a typical grip, and their Atlas wheels featuring their Vault hubs which we’ve loved as well. The rims are 30mm internally and give a nice stable profile for the tires. They have good engagement and are easy to convert to a variety of sizes and hub carriers (Microspline, XD, etc). The wheels come pre-built and are ready to rock tubeless out of the box. Adding CushCore / Huck Norris, FTD, or any other system is pretty straightforward from here. For tires we decided to try out the new Kenda Pinner tires on a downhill bike as well after trying them out on an enduro bike earlier this year. They are a 2.4 tire so they’re a little narrower than a typical 2.5 Maxxis tire. Rounding out the cockpit we went with a black stealth Renthal Fabar carbon handlebar that we’ve been saving up for a sweet build. The cables also tuck nicely into the internal routing channels as you can see below. The Renthal Integra stem is one of our favorites as well and it just works. It has good clamping around the entire handlebar without a huge gap on both sides for better clamping and even torque. We also like using Maxima’s assembly lube on some bolts on builds which help keep things snug and quiet. For the seat post we went with a tried and true Thomson Masterpiece and mated it to a Pivot WTB saddle. Overall we’re quite happy with the way this build came out and it’s been a dream to ride. Check back for Part 3 as we complete the review of our custom Pivot Phoenix 29. In the meantime check out the gallery below as there are a number of detailed pictures we didn’t cover above if you’re looking for more details. The post Pivot Phoenix 29 – Carbon Downhill Bike Review Build | Part 2 appeared first on Sick Lines - mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource.

Posted by
Sickline
62 - 22/10/2020 14:17:13

Come on, how sexy is this bike?! Not only does the brand new Orbea Rise sport a very slim silhouette, it’s also incredibly light. What makes the new Shimano EP8 RS motor so unique and how does Orbea’s new Light E-MTB fare on the trail? We’ve already tested one for you. Spanish performance brand Orbea is on a roll. Already last year, the newly released WILD FS with Bosch motor impressed the test crew of our big E-MOUNTAINBIKE group test delivering a solid performance on the trail. Just one year later, Orbea follow up with the Rise, which, with its modular battery concept based around the new Shimano EP8 motor, could set a new benchmark for weight and performance. We had the opportunity to test Orbea’s slim 18,18 kg Light eMTB even before its official release, putting it through the wringer on our local trails in the Black Forest. Orbea Rise M-Team | Shimano EP8 RS/360 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) | 150/140 mm (f/r)18.18 kg in size L | € 8,999 | Manfacturer’s website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The Orbea Rise in detail With the Rise, Orbea have reinterpreted the concept of “sporty eMTB” and developed a new bike completely from scratch. At the heart of the lightweight, 18,18 kg Rise M-Team carbon-bolide lies a Shimano EP8 motor that draws its power from a modular battery system – more on this later. The first question that inevitably arises is: what type of rider was Orbea’s Light eMTB with 29” wheels and 150/140 mm travel conceived for? The answer is simple: sporty mountain bikers and eMTBers. So it’s hardly surprising that Orbea have used some of the key elements of their popular trail bike, the Occam. Depending on the spec variant, the Rise was designed to shine on long sporty rides and fast-paced trail sessions. The mystery around the “RS” acronymThe Orbea team keeps quiet about the changes they’ve made to the Shimano EP8 motor and are reluctant to disclose the differences between the standard motor and the “RS” version of the Rise. Multi-PurposeWith the main charging socket you can charge the internal battery and also connect the range extender to the system via a short cable with click connector. Unfortunately, there’s no quick-charger option in Orbea’s configurator. In the MyO configurator you can choose your very own custom paint finish The new Orbea Rise exudes style in all details From fast-paced after-work laps to epic Alpine crossingsThe 360 Wh battery is integrated in the slim down tube. With an additional (and optional) battery in the bottle cage, the Rise reaches a total capacity of 612 Wh. The internal cable routing is solved just as neatly as … … the speed sensor, which is safely integrated in the dropout Peace and quietThe chunky chainstay protector efficiently eliminates chain slapping. Unfortunately, this doesn’t eliminate the loud clunking noise that comes from inside the EP8 motor. The Shimano EP8 RS motor of the Orbea Rise Light eMTB or eMTB all-rounder? It’s hard to put the Orbea Rise in one of the existing eMTB categories. While at just over 18 kg, it’s a lot lighter than most eMTB with a trail-oriented spec, the Shimano EP8 RS motor pushes noticeably harder than a Specialized SL1.1 or Fazua drive. Orbea achieved the low system weight through a clever modular battery system, which relies on an internal, fully integrated 360 Wh battery. An optional 252 Wh range extender, which can be stored in the bottle cage, boosts the battery capacity to a total of 612 Wh. The big difference with other current light eMTBs is the built-in Shimano EP8 RS motor. According to Shimano, the motor of the Orbea Rise shares the same hardware as the conventional EP8 motor – everything except the “RS” sticker. Just by tweaking the software of the motor, Orbea managed to reduce the maximum torque from 85 Nm to 60 Nm and adapt the characteristics of the motor to deliver a more natural and sportier riding experience. Despite the reduced torque, the EP8-RS delivers enough power to keep up with the “standard” Shimano or latest Bosch drives – and easily outperform a Specialized SL 1.1 motor uphill. Because at cadences between 80 and 90 rpm, neither the Performance Line CX nor the EP8 use their full torque at maximum power. The difference in torque becomes evident particularly when setting off, accelerating and negotiating steep technical climbs: here the EP8-RS requires more input from the rider and thus makes for a very natural, sporty ride feeling and reduced battery consumption. The motor-hardware of the Orbea isn’t special at all, it’s just an ordinary Shimano EP8 drive. However, Orbea tweaked the software to reduce the maximum torque to 60 Nm Orbea’s engineers have done an excellent job of implementing the concept around the new, lightweight Shimano motor. That being said, they’ve neither developed a new drive nor improved the hardware of the existing motor. And that’s exactly why we don’t get all the fuss around the RS acronym, especially considering that manufacturers like FOCUS and ROTWILD have already been using similar concepts for some time, allowing users to reduce the maximum torque of the Shimano motor using the E-TUBE PROJECT app. Except for the torque set at 60 Nm, the Orbea should offer similar configuration options, at least in terms of assist characteristics1 and assist characteristic at the start2. Unfortunately, when we tested the Rise, the app wasn’t available yet. Without the “RS” badge, the motor of the Rise cannot be distinguished from the “standard” Shimano EP8. This is more than mere coincidence, because the hardware remained unchanged. The spec of the Orbea Rise M-Team Is there anything cooler than a new bike with a sick finish? Yes, a new bike with a custom paint job, where you can choose the color and design details. Because when you order an Orbea, you can become a designer yourself. Using orbea’s MyO configurator, you can pick your favourite colour and customise the paint job of your Rise down to the smallest detail – for free! But the individualization options don’t stop here. Apart from the finish, you can choose from a number of components to individualise the spec of your bike according to your preferences, riding style and terrain. With all versions of the Rise, the configurator lets you pick and change ergonomically-relevant components and elements such as the saddle, crank length, dropper travel, handlebar width and stem length according to your ergonomic requirements and personal taste. Depending on the spec variant, you can also choose other components such as the tires, fork and rotor size. Soon Orbea customers will also be able to order the range extender for all versions of the Rise – presumably from February 2021. The entire Rise lineup comes with Fox suspension. At the rear, a DPX2 shock delivers 140 mm travel … … and at the front of the Team Model, a 150 mm FOX 36 Factory fork with GRIP2 damper takes care of the rough stuff Important upgradeFor the time being, Orbea will deliver all Rise versions with 180 mm rotors, which are too small for the intended use of the bike. However, in the near future customers will be able to order their bike with 200 mm rotors front and rear, which is the setup we recommend. Unless you live in the Californian desert, we recommend upgrading the standard Rekon tires with a DISSECTOR on the rear … … and a Minion DHF up front. However, both of these tires are only available with a thin EXO casing in Orbea’s configurator. With its burly spec, our € 8,999 Rise M-Team test bike is trimmed for uncompromised trail performance. For this version, Orbea have bumped up the travel of the FOX 36 Factory GRIP2 fork from 150 mm to 140 mm. In the rear, a DPX2 shock provides 140 mm travel. Powerful four-piston Shimano XTR brakes replace the standard 2-pot version of the other Rise models, providing reliable deceleration on tough trail sessions. That being said, the 180 mm Galfer rotors are far too small and cause the entire brake system to overheat on long descents. In the near future, Orbea customers will be able to order their Rise with 200 mm rotors front and rear, which is the setup we recommend. If you don’t pay attention while configuring your bike, you could end up with the standard Rekon EXO+ tires. Unless you’re based in the Californian desert or planning to take part in a XC race on your new eMTB, we recommend selecting the Minion DHF/Dissector combo from the available upgrade list in Orbea’s configurator – these provide plenty more grip. For our test bike, Orbea had already fitted the right tires on the Race Face Turbine alloy wheelset for the wet soil of the Black Forest – a great choice for our heavy chief-of-testing Felix and his aggressive riding style! Light riders can also choose a carbon wheelset from the configurator, which should bring down the total system weight to less than 18 kg. Orbea is one of the first brands that also takes into consideration the purists of eMTBing, allowing them to select or deselect the Shimano display and remote from the configurator. This can be done thanks to the small EW-EN100 dongle, which replaces both the Shimano display and remote control and allows you to switch between the three support levels. For the time being the dongle is still a little rudimental, on one hand because it’s not integrated well into the cockpit and instead attached to the brake/shift cable, on the other because it doesn’t allow you to shift between the two riding profiles of the EP8 motor. However, Orbea have assured that there will soon be a software update for the Shimano E-TUBE PROJECT app, which allows users to switch between the two riding profiles. Orbea Rise M-Team€ 8,999SpecificationsMotor Shimano EP8 RS 60 NmBattery Orbea internal 360 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) Display Shimano SC-EM800Fork FOX 36 Factory GRIP2 150 mmRear Shock FOX DPX2 Factory 140 mmSeatpost FOX Transfer Factory 125 - 175 mmBrakes Shimano XTR 4-Kolben 180/180 mmDrivetrain Shimano XTR 1x12Stem Race Face Turbine R 50 mmHandlebar Race Face Next R 780 mmWheelset Race Face Turbine R 29"Tires MAXXIS Minion DHF/Dissector 2.5"/2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 18.18 kgPerm. total weight n/a kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) n/a kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount noSpecific Featuresmodular battery-systemGarmin IQ connectivity features Clean cockpitOrbea’s MyO configurator allows (purist) users to deselect both the Shimano display and remote and run their Rise on a EW-EN100 dongle. This makes for a minimal look and very clean cockpit. That being said, there’s still room for improvement as far as the integration of the dongle is concerned. Display alternativeThe Rise is extensively linked to the Garmin ecosystem, which means you can use an Edge GPS device or Garmin Smartwatch to display all the relevant riding data! Further Orbea Rise models In addition to the Orbea Rise M-Team in our test, there are three more pre-configured Rise models customers can choose from: the superlight, top of the range Rise M-LTD model, which costs € 9,899 and weighs just over 16 kg (manufacturer’s specifications), and a more tour-oriented entry-level model, the Rise M20, which retails at € 5,999. Both versions rely on lighter components (e.g. two-piston brakes) and 140 mm forks. Last but not least, the M10 model, which costs € 7,599 and offers the best price-performance ratio in our opinion. Like the M-Team version in our test, it features a 150 mm fork and was designed for uncompromised trail performance. Orbea Rise M-LTD | Shimano EP8 RS/361 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) | 140/140 mm (f/r) € 9,899 | manfacturer website Orbea Rise M10 | Shimano EP8 RS/362 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) | 150/140 mm (f/r) € 7,599 | manfacturer website The geometry of the Orbea Rise Not only visually, the Orbea Rise has a lot in common with Orbea’s popular trail bike, the Occam, which lends its geometry and chassis to its motorised counterpart. While the two frames are pretty much identical, the engineers stretched the chainstays by 5mm to make room for the Shimano EP8 RS motor in the bottom bracket area. With a head angle of 65.5° and long mainframe (474 mm reach in L), already on paper the Rise looks like an aggressive trail bike. At 76.5 °, the seat angle is pleasantly steep and doesn’t slacken out excessively as the dropper extends. On top of this, the short seat tube and a generous seatpost insertion depth allow you to use long-travel droppers and also to choose from more than just one frame size. With four available sizes, there should be a suitable Rise for everyone measuring between 150 cm to 198 cm. Steep seat angle, short seat tube, deep seatpost insertion and dropper travel choice: Orbea really killed it with the Rise! Size S M L XL Seat tube 381 mm 419 mm 457 mm 508 mm Top tube 565 mm 592 mm 619 mm 649 mm Head tube 95 mm 105 mm 120 mm 140 mm Head angle 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° Seat angle 76.5° 76.5° 76.5° 76.5° Chainstay 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm BB Drop 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm Wheelbase 1165 mm 1194 mm 1224 mm 1259 mm Reach 425 mm 450 mm 474 mm 500 mm Stack 604 mm 613 mm 627 mm 646 mm Helmet Giro Manifest Spherical Shirt ION LS Scrub Mesh_ine Shorts ION Scrub Amp Kneepads Sweet Protection Bearsuit Light Orbea Rise First ride review Wow! That’s exactly how you want an aggressive, trail-oriented eMTB to ride! As soon as you hit the trails, you realise that the Rise wasn’t just designed to look great but also to deliver tons of fun on demanding trails. Amongst the striking features, the comfortable riding position, which reminds us of modern trail bikes. The steep seat angle makes for a centered and upright riding position. This ensures comfort both on flat trails and steep climbs, because the well balanced weight distribution doesn’t require the rider to actively load the front wheel. Despite the significant torque reduction, the Rise climbs extremely well on forest paths. Thanks to the low system weight and minimal pedalling resistance, the Rise makes for a fun ride even with little or no support. If you think that with 60 Nm torque the Orbea Rise is a nightmare on technical climbs, you’re wrong. Provided you’re using the right cadence, you can easily keep up with more powerful eMTB all-rounders. When the climb gets steeper, the tweaked software of the EP8 RS motor delivers a very natural riding experience and top modulation. This, combined with the low system weight and agile handling, allows you to negotiate technical climbs using your riding skills rather than relying on the raw power of the motor. Downhill, the excellent handling puts the Orbea Rise in the league of light eMTBs – in a good way. Because at 18,18 kg, the Orbea Rise is very light considering the burly spec. While a light eMTB isn’t necessarily a great trail bike, the Orbea is exactly that: the low system weight combined with a successful geometry, top suspension and sensible spec make for top trail performance. The 474 mm reach (size L) and 445 mm chainstays position the rider centrally when riding downhill. In open corners, the bike generates an equal amount of grip on both wheels, proving that the Rise is extremely well balanced. Thanks to its lively character and stiff, very supportive suspension, the Orbea Rise is damn fast yet easy to handle through tight corners and allows for spontaneous line changes, last minute high lines and improvised flicks to avoid obstacles. Berms and open corners are a real pleasure with the nimble Orbea Rise. The swingarm could do with better tire clearance. After a few high-speed corners, the paint already started rubbing off the seatstay. Unfortunately, the MyO configurator only includes tires in EXO and EXO+ casing. Orbea should add tires with a more robust casing for the trail-oriented Rise M team version. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Nevertheless, the Orbea Rise still feels composed even at higher speed and always inspires confidence. The sporty and stiff chassis gives the rider lots of feedback while generating tons of traction and offering plenty of reserves even at high speed – not even nasty root carpets and tricky rock gardens can stop the Orbea Rise M-Team. If you spend most of your time on rough trails, you should definitely choose the 150 mm FOX 36 fork with GRIP2 damper cartridge over the 140 mm FOX 36 with FIT4 damper. The handling of the ORBEA RISE is next level! Hardly any other eMTB is this much fun and so fast on the trail. Hardly any other eMTB negotiates jumps as intuitively and spontaneously as the Orbea Rise. Even with little physical effort and small bunny hops, the light eMTB jumps higher and further than most current eMTBs on the market. At the same time, it handles hard and messy landings without batting an eyelid and always delivers fun. Downhill, only the loud clunking noise from the inside the Shimano motor casts a dark shadow over the overall outstanding riding experience. Read more about the annoying clunking noise in our motor test. Conclusions With the new Orbea Rise, the Spaniards deliver a well thought-out overall concept, blurring the thin line between the ‘Light eMTB’ and ‘eMTB allrounder’ segments. Downhill, the agile handling of the light Rise M-Team is a perfect match for sporty and aggressive trail riders. Despite the torque reduction, the bike doesn’t compromise on the uphill either and the optional range extender lets you embark on long rides with your buddies with “Bosch League” bikes. If that wasn’t good enough, the many spec options and countless customisation options of the MyO configurator allow for an individualised customisation of your Rise. TopsOutstanding handlingModular battery systemMyO configurator allows for custom finish and specFlopsRattling noises from the motorPoor tire clearanceRange extender not available for the time being More info at orbea.com Assist characteristicThis is the level of support i.e. by how much the motor multiplies the input of the rider. With a high setting, the motor assists very powerfully with little effort from the rider, while a low setting means you have to put a lot of pressure on the pedals to get the maximum torque and power out of the motor. Of all parameters, the assist characteristic has the greatest influence on the feel of the motor on the trail↩Assist characteristic at the startThis is the sensitivity of the motor when pulling away and only refers to the moment when you put your foot on the pedal and exert that initial bit of pressure to get going. In the fast setting, the motor reacts quickly, with relatively little effort and minimal rotation of the cranks, making it ideal for experienced riders. The lower the setting, the slower the EP8 responds to input on the pedals, both in relation to the force exerted and to the rotation of the cranks. The assist characteristic at the start has a marginal influence on battery consumption as this parameter affects the motor’s output for less than a full revolution of the cranks.↩Der Beitrag New 2021 Orbea Rise first ride review – Light eMTB with motor power erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
34 - 22/10/2020 11:00:44

The Escarpe and Sommet get completely updated for 2021 while still remaining very reasonably priced.( Photos: 19 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
24pts
22/10/2020
40 - 21/10/2020 07:17:11

An in-depth analysis of Shimano's newest motor.( Photos: 18, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike