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0pts - 28 minutes ago

Spurcycle has a lot of made in the U.S.A products that we have been digging. Inside we tak...

Posted by
Sickline
2pts - 09/12/2019 08:17:14

Last year, Shimano quietly released the BL-MT501/BR-MT520. Why the stealth? Well, they mad...

Posted by
Bike Mag
6pts - 09/12/2019 03:34:19

A couple of years ago, Dynaplug seemed to be the only tubeless tire plug option on the mar...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
19pts - 07/12/2019 10:00:33

The Canadian crew take a look back at a wild year of riding.( Photos: 37, C...

Posted by
Pinkbike
30pts - 06/12/2019 08:17:15

With its out-of-the-box suspension concept and remarkable descending characteristics, the ...

Posted by
Bike Mag
12pts - 05/12/2019 22:17:13

We continue our 25 Days of...

Posted by
Sickline
23pts - 04/12/2019 16:34:15

Ready to bomb trails at a moment's notice, the all...

Posted by
Mountain Bike Action
2pts - 04/12/2019 08:34:14

"How short is too short?" The Pacenti P-Dent would tell you "There's no such thing as too ...

Posted by
Bike Mag
2pts - 03/12/2019 23:34:17

The world of tire inserts seems to be ever expanding lately, and in the last few months I&...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
4pts - 03/12/2019 19:51:15

As British as Yorkshire Pudding and Coronation Street, but probably a lot more fu...

Posted by
Pinkbike

Latest Photos

0 - 28 minutes ago

Spurcycle has a lot of made in the U.S.A products that we have been digging. Inside we take a look at some of their items that work great as a gift for yourself or someone special. Video Overview Key Clip If you’re looking for a swanky gift for yourself or someone special this year the Spurcycle Key clip ($39) might fit the bill. Made in the U.S.A., this titanium clip comes in handy to secure keys or even ID badges to a belt buckle or anything you want to clip your keys onto. Like all good bike products, the Spurcycle Ti clip doubles as a bottle opener. The titanium clip is lightweight and Spurcycle says it only weighs 20g. Ours was even lighter at 19g. Spurcycle Bell The Spurcycle Bell ($49) is a beautiful U.S.A. bell composed of brass and stainless teel. It has a nice tone that can easily be heard from afar and has been working very well for us. A bell can be quite useful on the trail and the lever is easy to actuate and alert upcoming riders, walkers, or hikers that may or may not see you on the trail. Don’t be fooled by the cheap knock-off bells on Amazon if you’re after a loud high quality bell in our opinion.   Our Spurcycle bell weighed in at a mere 41g as well. Spurcycle backs their products with service and warranty. If you ever have a problem with your bell or want it refreshed, they’re more than willing to step up. Our bicycle bells include a promise to be the best now and forever. That means we guarantee them for the life of ownership. Should you ever find your bell isn’t performing as expected or would like us to make it sparkle for you, just send it back to our shop for a complete factory overhaul. – Spurcycle   Spurcycle also makes a variety of other products like their weatherproof foldable Dyneema fabric Multi Pouch, Ti tool, Hip Pack, and more. Check back daily throughout the month of December as we post more content in our 25 days of Sickness!

Posted by
Sickline
2 - 09/12/2019 08:17:14

Last year, Shimano quietly released the BL-MT501/BR-MT520. Why the stealth? Well, they made have made an inexpensive brake a bit too good for its own good. The post Tested: Shimano BL-MT501/BR-MT520 | $145 per brake appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
6 - 09/12/2019 03:34:19

A couple of years ago, Dynaplug seemed to be the only tubeless tire plug option on the market, but since then a handful of others joined onto the scene. Also a few years ago, riders were using very crude Jandd straps to fasten a spare tube to their bikes, but now there are options galore. Recently Lezyne sent out a couple of new bits for us to test. To stash a handful of necessities on bike, they now have the Sendit Caddy, and for an all in one plug kit/inflator, they rolled out the Tubeless CO2 Blaster just after Sea Otter. Read on for some thoughts on the combo. Details Sendit Caddy $19.99 Fits: Multi Tool, CO2, Tire levers, 29″ tube Neoprene pouches for padding Rubberized straps to prevent slippage/damage to frame Tubeless CO2 Blaster $49.99 Inflator/plugger combo Steel reamer has built in scourer Comes with 5 heavy duty plus Through a really smart design, Lezyne managed to squeeze quite a few features into an all-in-one setup. The black canister houses 5 spare plugs and covers the awl so it doesn’t stab anything that it’s not supposed to. The inflator has a dial, so you can modulate how you exhaust the CO2. The tip is tapered so that even if you’re penetrating a small hole, it won’t be too difficult. There is also some knurling behind it so you can rough up your tire and get better adhesion with the plug. There is a stretchy section that houses the tube, with grippy silicone lettering to prevent slippage on your frame. The strap itself is rubberized with tough, no-slip material. Three neoprene pouches are labelled for various items. Since I have a SWAT tool in my steerer tube, I figured the Blaster was a great placeholder for the multi tool pouch. Either way – having separate, padded partitions is really nice so you’re never worried about dumping your stuff out while you’re already frustrated by a flat tire. In use Coming from the surf world, I’m well familiar with neoprene, and was happy to see it used in this application as it helps with both padding and ensuring a snug fit at the same time. I’ve used a handful of tube straps at this point – some are easier on frames than others, and some stay put better than others. Lezyne did their homework with the Sendit Caddy as it both protects the frame and stays nicely fixed. The large rubberized strap made it easy to harp on, even with wet or sweaty hands and nothing was clanking together since everything is nicely separated. As for the Tubeless CO2 Blaster, it limits the number of independent bits that you need to carry and keeps things organized as all of your tire plugging and inflating related stuff is in one place. The time span that I’ve spent testing this plug kit was not during my once every year or two flat tire timeframe. But…I got bored and stabbed a worn out tire to test it. While the whole thing works really really brilliantly, my favorite feature is illustrated in the photo below…. Once you jab your tire with the plug and re-inflate it, you unscrew the cone shaped gold bit and slide it down over the puncture. You then use it to hold the plug down on the tire and yank the punch out. The punch has a gap in it so that with a little wiggling, the plug can slide right through. This made it quite easy to use and while it’s a bit hard to tell from one test usage, that cone certainly seemed like it made it easier to mitigate any lost air pressure. Overall At the end of the day these are a couple of very nicely thought out bits from Lezyne. At ~$50, the inflator seems a little pricey, but keep in mind, it’s an inflator, a brilliantly thought out plug kit (that works better than most any other minimalist combo options) and tidy storage for spare plugs. As for the Sendit Caddy, I like it better than anything else I’ve tried to date including the Backcountry Mutherload and the Dakine Hot Laps. If you’re having a look around, check out some of Lezyne’s other sneaky storage options at the link below. You won’t be sorry. www.lezyne.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
19 - 07/12/2019 10:00:33

The Canadian crew take a look back at a wild year of riding.( Photos: 37, Comments: 12 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
30 - 06/12/2019 08:17:15

With its out-of-the-box suspension concept and remarkable descending characteristics, the Druid a refreshing offering in the super-versatile 29er trail bike category. The post Tested: Forbidden Druid appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
12 - 05/12/2019 22:17:13

We continue our 25 Days of Sickness with a deep dive into some Park Tool P-Handle wrenches. Park Tool is a staple in the bike industry and inside we take a look at their Hex Wrench Set and Torx Wrench Set. Video Overview If you go into just about any bike shop today you will see these wrenches in their mechanics tool area and it’s for a good reason. The Park Tool P-Handle wrenches are often a go-to tool for shop mechanics and we’ll explore them more below. The P-Handle wrench sets are available in Hex/Allen format as well as Torx. Sizes include most everything you’ll find on a most bikes today 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10mm in the Hex set T6, T8, T10, T15, T20, T25, T30, and T40 in the Torx set The Park Tool P-Handle sets include pegboard mounting hardware and a holder for the wrenches with labels for each size. The holder has been improved and is much easier to read now. The holder is also available separately (HXH-2P and HXH-2T). The three holes on the front of the holder also allow you to install 3 additional wrenches like a 3 way, or other hex multitool.   The nylon handle is ergonomic and comfortable in the hand for all day use. Additional leverage can be placed on the long end and braced with your hand to provide good torque through the head for additional leverage if needed. I have had a set since 2004 that are still going strong after all this time and are still well within spec. The long end of the Hex/Allen is a ball end which allows you to maneuver the wrench into a fastener if it’s hard to reach. You can get a good amount of torque this way but the straight end of the hex is a more ideal end to use for final torquing or initial release on a allen bolt in our experience. Torx bits have become more common on bikes lately and Park Tool makes a similar style wrench to suit those fasteners as well (T6-t40 included). Looking at the Torx wrenches in detail they take similar queues to the Hex/Allen set in form and function. Unlike the Hex set however, the torx bit on the long end of the wrench is straight and not a ball style. There are a lot of hex wrenches to pick from today. They all offer benefits that vary depending on your needs. Beta, Craftsman, Husky, Silca, Tekton, PB Swiss, Feedback Sports, and many more. A longer length hex wrench will give you more leverage / torque in a given situation and that can be good or bad depending on your needs so it’s not uncommon to want different types if you wrench on bikes a lot. The ergonomic handle and P-style wrench aren’t as easy to spin bolts as quickly as a traditional T-handle style wrench. The overall balance and ball-end of the tool can make it trickier to spin bolts quickly with the long end comparatively but you can spin bolts nicely by using the short end if there is ample room. Park used to include a plastic sleeve on their P-handle wrenches that helped spin them a little bit but it also had its flaws as the rubber o-rings eventually fail and the sleeve can fall off. Check out the video for how that used to work above.   We love using these Park Tool wrenches as they are very useful in the workshop and in the field. They give good leverage in most every situation. The ball end has it’s plusses and minuses but works quite well for bikes. The ball end is great for getting into tough to reach spots due to their ability to work off-center of the bolt but are not as confident for high-torque situations. To finish torque or release torque I often revert to the straight champfered end of the tool if conditions allow for it. Tolerances on these P-Handle wrenches are good on my set from 2003 still. The new ones were evenly as well for the ones I checked. For example my 2003 4mm measured 3.97mm and the new ones I got measured 3.98mm on each of the 3 sides of the allen. If the tool is too big it won’t fit in the all bolt and if its not evenly spaced across the 3 sides of the hex then you can round out a fastener. Park Tool also makes their HT-6/ HT-8 / HT-10 that are more comfortable for torquing pedals and cranks easier compared to the P-Style wrenches you see here. Often bolts/pedals can benefit from the extra length of a deeper allen. What could be improved? As far as updates to future Park’s P-handle wrench sets we wouldn’t mind seeing these updates in future revisions Different colored heads or size identifying colors would be a nice addition. This way you could easily know by sight which size is which specifically for the smaller allens or torx that can be harder to differentiate Easier to read sizing on the handle would be nice for cases when you don’t have them inside the holder.   P-HANDLE HEX WRENCH SET : ITEM # PH-1.2 MSRP $75.95 P-HANDLE TORXยฎ COMPATIBLE WRENCH SET : ITEM # PH-T1.2 MSRP $71.95 Check back daily throughout the month of December as we post more content in our 25 days of Sickness!

Posted by
Sickline