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111pts - 2 hours ago

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The Bike Dads - RSS
117pts - 20/04/2019 23:17:20

We first spotted the Trust Message fork last y...

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Bike Radar
137pts - 19/04/2019 10:17:20

Named after the legendary Cape Epic stage race, the Specialized Epic is designed t...

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Enduro MTB - RSS
138pts - 18/04/2019 21:51:18

Look debuted their new

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Electric Bike Action
139pts - 18/04/2019 07:17:21

Normal conventions don’t apply to the Transition Smuggler Carbon, and that’s kind of the p...

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Bike Mag
141pts - 17/04/2019 22:51:24

Posted by
The Bike Dads - RSS
133pts - 17/04/2019 15:00:59

Push's latest suspension solution is designed increase the level of adjustability...

Posted by
Pinkbike
143pts - 17/04/2019 10:34:20

In the “The Lab” we present the latest products and put them through their paces f...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
133pts - 17/04/2019 09:17:20

Posted by
Bike Radar
174pts - 16/04/2019 17:51:20

The Meta AM 29 puts speed and fun in a synergistic balance. Going all-out feels safe enoug...

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Bike Mag

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111 - 2 hours ago

Prevelo Bikes has re-designed their kids MTB line this after only one year in operation...amazing. A successful first season, they managed to improve on an already great frame a part spec. In the case of the new 16 inch hardtail, the Zulu 2 Heir, Prevelo have gone beyond any other bike manufacturer big or small to develop a kids specific 16 inch travel air fork. Here we look at this amazing little machine and see how it stands out from other 16 inch bikes. Thanks to Prevelo Bikes for providing a bike to review.   Prevelo Zulu 2 Heir Details: Intended Age- 4 to 6 years Weight- 18.0 lbs Features- Custom carbon lower air fork with 60 mm travel, hydraulic disc brakes, 2.1 inch Innova tires, 95mm cranks, 67 HA MSRP- $799 USD, Rigid fork $469 Available- Prevelo Bikes     The Bike Dads' Take: "This bike is exactly what we were looking for. The fork is truly incredible with its ability to soak up bumps with lightest of weight riders. Wide rims and wide tires offer amazing traction and enhance the shredability with its longer wheelbase, 67 degree HA and hydraulic dis brakes. The kids specific handlebar, grips and cranks are welcome features for these tiny rippers. If your little 4/5 year old loves to descend MTB flow trails with you...this bike is the answer." -Colin Recent Blog Posts Picking The First Pedal Bike Prevelo Zulu 2 Heir Review Early Rider Trail 24 Review Extending Ride Time in the Winter The Raise Riders Family Bicycle Weekend Saracen Mantra 2.4 Review Burley D’lite Trailer Review Tout Terrain Streamliner Review Woom 1 Plus Balance Bike Review Rocky Mountain Reaper Review Opus Nix 20 inch Review The post Prevelo Zulu 2 Heir Review appeared first on The Bike Dads.

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The Bike Dads - RSS
117 - 20/04/2019 23:17:20

We first spotted the Trust Message fork last year and have been dying to get a hands-on look at it. Finally, at Sea Otter 2019, the wait was over. Interestingly, our very own Seb Stott designed his fantasy bike of the future with a rather funky-looking linkage fork. So, how does a version of his futuristic fantasy shape up in reality? Have a break with Yeti: Colorado-based brand launches SB130 Lunch Ride YT has solved the box vs bike bag dilemma with the Body Bag Niner’s MCR 9 RDO magic carpet gravel bike is almost here Trust Message fork design and theory We can’t wait to test a pair of the forks to see if they’re worthy of the $2,700 price tag Ben Duke As the first port of call before reading this article, it’s certainly worth familiarising yourself with Seb’s fantastic bike geometry guide to help you understand some of the terms mentioned below. The Message fork’s party piece has to be its trailing linkage design. A trailing linkage fork means the wheel’s axle is behind, rather than in front of the linkage system. In theory, this means the forks have better stability by preserving handling during suspension compression. The forks cost $2,700! Ben Duke To do this, the wheel’s axle path as the suspension compresses isn’t travelling in line with the fork’s steering axis like traditional forks. Instead, the linkage acts in such a way that as the suspension compresses there’s a corresponding change in fork offset to help maintain the bike’s handling. The linkage design also means the fork can now have a variable leverage ratio like we’ve found on rear suspension systems for years. The Message, Trust claims, has a supple beginning stroke ratio that changes as the fork goes through its travel, hardening to help increase bottom-out resistance. The linkage helps to maintain its caster throughout the fork’s travel Ben Duke The Message’s design also claims to help reduce friction that’s caused by stanchions sliding through seals and bushings. Normally the fork’s moving parts have to do two things — make the fork stiff and provide the telescopic movement to absorb bumps — in order to be stiff they need to have larger diameter stanchions which creates more friction and a less supple action. The forks can take both 650b and 29-inch wheels and have a 535mm axle to crown length Ben Duke Trust has separated these two attributes. The linkage provides the movement of the suspension and the fork’s chassis helps with structural stiffness. Trust claims that this helps to improve the feel of the fork. Another benefit, Trust claims, is the fork’s ability to resist diving under braking, which helps to maintain the bike’s geometry and therefore improves your ability to control the bike. Although this isn’t a mechanical ability to resist dive, ‘anti-dive’ is created by the fork’s leverage ratio. Trust Message fork details and specs There’s a pushrod attached to the trailing linkage to actuate the fork’s damping and spring Ben Duke The forks have 130mm of travel, weigh a claimed 1,980 grams, are constructed from a carbon fibre chassis and have a carbon steerer tube and linkages. They’re compatible with 29-, 27.-5 and 27.5+-inch tyre sizes and can accommodate up to 2.8-inch wide tyres. They’re best suited to 29er frames with between 110 and 140mm travel and 650b frames with between 130 and 140mm of travel. The fork’s got plenty of tyre clearance Ben Duke They use 15X110 Boost axle spacing and are compatible with tapered head tubes. There’s a 180mm direct mount brake system, but with an adaptor it’s possible to run a 203mm rotor. The damper has a three-way adjustable compression lever which means you can run the forks in firm, mid or open modes depending on what or how you’re riding. The fork’s air pressure (in PSI) is set up on a one-to-one basis with your weight in pounds. Simply weigh yourself with your riding kit on and input the corresponding amount of pressure. There’s a small peephole on the side of the Message fork so that you can adjust the medium and open mode settings Ben Duke Both the open mode and mid mode have finer compression adjustments that are located through an access port on the side of the fork. The forks chassis, steerer tube and linkages are made form carbon Ben Duke The forks also have a token-based bottom-out resistance tuning system called ‘Huck Pucks’. It’s possible to add up to six tokens to adjust how the fork behaves towards the end of its travel. But it’s important to include the same number of Huck Pucks in each fork leg. We’re hoping to get a set of forks in to test in the near future so stay tuned for a full review.

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Bike Radar
137 - 19/04/2019 10:17:20

Named after the legendary Cape Epic stage race, the Specialized Epic is designed to hunt down seconds on the XC race circuit. So what’s a cross country bike doing at ENDURO? Specialized Epic Expert EVO | 120/100 mm (f/r) | 12.06 kg | € 5,599 googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Simple: designating the bike with the “EVO” suffix, Specialized have turned the Epic Expert from an XC race bike into a trail rocket. As befits a bike of this category, the € 5,599 Epic Expert EVO features a lightweight carbon fibre frame (the same as the non-EVO), 29″ wheels and 100 mm of travel at the rear. So far, so XC. But the EVO also has a dropper post, a 120 mm travel fork and sturdy tires, bringing it to a non-XC weight of 12.06 kg. To find out whether this spicy mixture makes for an epic ride, we took it up steep climbs, on long rides, on alpine singletrack, and on the flow trails of Bike Republic Sölden. The Specialized Epic Expert EVO in detail Counting the grams wasn’t the priority for Specialized when they specced the Specialized Epic Expert EVO! Goodbye weight weenie, hello trail fun! Compared to the regular Epic models, the travel on the FOX 34 Step-Cast has increased by 20 mm to 120 mm. The firm 100 mm travel at the rear is controlled by the proprietary RockShox Micro Brain shock, developed specifically for the Epic. The Brain 2.0 system on the rear axle opens and closes the compression unit of the shock via an inertia valve, locking out the shock when you pedal, but opening as soon as an obstacle hits the wheel. The sensitivity of the valve and thus the responsiveness of the bike can be adjusted from soft and relatively sensitive to hard and efficient for pedalling. Fork FOX 34 Performance Step-Cast 120 mm Shock Custom RockShox Micro Brain 100 mm Brakes SRAM Level-TL Drivetrain SRAM GX-Eagle Seatpost X-Fusion Manic 125 mm Stem Specialized XC 80 mm Handlebar Specialized Alloy Mini Rise 750 mm Wheels Roval Control Carbon Tires Specialized Ground Control/Fast Trak 29″ x 2,3″ Weight 12.06 kg Price € 5,599 A 125 mm X-Fusion Manic dropper seat post allows for more freedom of movement on the downhills. The 29 “x 2.3” tires are fitted to lightweight Roval Control carbon rims. For the rear tire of the Epic EVO, puncture protection comes first. The shallow profile of the Fast Trak features Specialized’s tough GRID Enduro casing. Given the higher weight of the build, we would happily have taken on a bit more weight over the SRAM Level TL brakes, for something more powerful. Very smartThe slim RockShox Micro Brain shock is available exclusively on the Epic. The steel braided hose connecting the shock to the Brain on the rear axle is integrated into the yoke. Not an option for heavy ridersOn long descents, the SRAM Level TL brakes and the small rotors (180/160 mm) quickly reach their limit. Larger rotors or a set of light four-piston brakes would suit the bike better. Up and downOn Trail bikes, they’ve long become the norm, and more and more Cross Country racers are also discovering the benefits of dropper posts. The dropper on the Epic EVO only has a 125 mm of travel though. Super fast yet toughSpecialized’s Fast Trak tire on the rear rolls damn fast and the puncture-proof GRID casing is borrowed from their Enduro tires. That’s how we like it! Not the smartest brain going downhillThe Brain is extremely effective in preventing pedal-bob. Unfortunately, there is a noticeable delay before the shock opens, which made us ride it primarily in the softest setting. Delicate, but ready to shred Due to the special arrangement of the carbon fibres in the rear triangle, the seat and chain stays flex enough to be able to dispense with the additional pivot point. This saves a lot of weight, looks sexy and works very well even on rough trails. The geometry of the Specialized Epic Expert EVO Size S M L XL Seat tube 400 mm 434 mm 470 mm 520 mm Top tube 571 mm 599 mm 626 mm 650 mm Head tube 95 mm 105 mm 120 mm 140 mm Head angle 68.5° 68.5° 68.5° 68.5° Seat angle 73.8° 73.8° 73.8° 73.8° Chainstays 438 mm 438 mm 438 mm 438 mm BB Drop 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm Wheelbase 1103 mm 1132 mm 1159 mm 1186 mm Reach 398 mm 423 mm 446 mm 465 mm Stack 595 mm 605 mm 619 mm 638 mm Helmet Specialized Ambush | Glasses 100% Speedcraft | Shirt POC Resistance Mid 3/4 Jersey | Shorts ROCDAY ROC Lite Shorts googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The Specialized Epic Expert EVO on the trail Taking a seat on the Specialized Epic EVO, you immediately feel ready to take on the next stage race. The riding position is somewhat aggressive, as you would expect for a “cross country” bike, but not too extreme. The longer fork and added rise of the 750 mm wide handlebar, means the cockpit sits a bit higher than on a thoroughbred race bike, taking a lot of pressure off your hands. The firmly tuned suspension sits high in its travel and the lack of sag means we never noticed the (on paper) slack seat tube angle in a negative way. Unless it’s in the softest setting, the Brain 2.0 prevents almost any pedal-bob. As a result, the Epic EVO is a damn fast climber and almost as efficient as a hardtail. However, with the Brain in the firmer setting trail chatter gets transferred to the rider almost completely unfiltered. It’s only with larger obstacles that the shock opens to provide traction and comfort at the rear. While climbing, the Brain is brilliant – there is no pedal-bob on the Epic EVO, turning every watt into propulsion. Although sprinting to the summit is the prime discipline of “normal” Epics, the heart of the Epic EVO beats for downhills and flowing trails. Along with the bottom bracket, the rider’s centre of gravity is positioned very low on the bike. The frame has enough standover clearance to offer plenty of freedom of movement, but a longer travel dropper post would provide even more space to manoeuvre on the bike. The low centre of gravity coupled with sufficient weight on the front wheel lets you carry a lot of speed through corners and berms. The Epic EVO is easy to air off obstacles on the trail, pump through rollers or manual out of a berm, not least because of its low weight and firm suspension. Here, the Brain even makes sense on the downhills, making for a fun, fast and engaging ride. However, on rougher trails the system reveals a different side. The shock responds to hits with a small delay and while this wasn’t particularly noticeable on big hits like landings or compressions, it did bother us for smaller successive hits, where we expected the suspension to react more sensitively. The delay in the Brain valve opening wasn’t only uncomfortable but also lead to a loss of grip on the rear wheel. In practice, that meant that on natural singletrack we only rode the bike with the Brain in the softest setting. Nevertheless, with its playful handling and well-balanced geometry, the Epic EVO is a lot of fun on technically demanding trails. Conclusion The Specialized Epic Expert EVO convinced our test team with the fun and direct handling of a firmly tuned Trail bike. However, with the Brain 2.0 shock system deliberately dispensing with unnecessary comfort, it also has the efficiency of a cross country race bike. Unless you’ve got a realistic chance at winning gold at the Olympics, or at least compete on a national level, the Specialized Epic Expert EVO is a much better choice than a purebred race bike. For more info head to: specialized.com This article is from ENDURO issue #037ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free! The post The Better Choice – The Specialized Epic Expert EVO in review appeared first on ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine.

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Enduro MTB - RSS
138 - 18/04/2019 21:51:18

Look debuted their new E-765 Optimum bike at the Sea Otter Classic, with a Fazua motor system. Possibly one of the lightest on the market, and the carbon is designed with two waves in the stays to offer a 15% increase in the flexibility of the carbon for better vibration damping. We saw a ton of bikes with the Fazua Evation motor and that’s one of the trends you’ll see in the next issue. It’s one of the smallest and lightest motors on the market. The post LOOK E-765 OPTIMUM E-BIKE SPOTTED AT SEA OTTER appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
139 - 18/04/2019 07:17:21

Normal conventions don’t apply to the Transition Smuggler Carbon, and that’s kind of the point. The post Tested: Transition Smuggler Carbon GX appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

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Bike Mag
141 - 17/04/2019 22:51:24

Born from picturesque Henley on Thames England, Early Rider designs and builds are thoughtfully procured with the littlest riders in mind. Light weights, innovative frame design and cool belt drive trains come in a full line of kids bikes from Balance bikes on through to 24 inch hardtail mountain bikes. Here, we look at the T24 Works edition 24 inch trail slaying 24 inch hardtail. Thanks to Early Rider for providing a demo bike for us to review.   Early Rider T24 Works Details: Intended Age- 8 plus Weight- 24.0 lbs Features- RST Snyper Air Fork with 100mm travel, Sram Level T hydraulic dis brakes, Maxxis Synper 2.0X24 tires, 11 spd 1X Shimano drivetrain with 10-42 Cassette and GX clutch derailleur, 155 mm Sram NX Cranks MSRP- $1400 USD, Trail build is $1099 Available- REI | Early Rider                         The Bike Dads' Take: "An absolute trail slaying hard tail for the hard charging 8-11 year old. The ER T24 works is a very balanced bike with great geometry and a top notch build spec. The fork is amazing and can really gobble up what the trail offers even with light weight riders. Combined with a slack Head angle (my iphone angle meter puts it at 66/67 degrees), this is a perfect upsize from a 20 inch hard tail for those kids who want to climb higher and descend faster" -Colin Recent Blog Posts Picking The First Pedal Bike Early Rider Trail 24 Review Extending Ride Time in the Winter The Raise Riders Family Bicycle Weekend Saracen Mantra 2.4 Review Burley D’lite Trailer Review Tout Terrain Streamliner Review Woom 1 Plus Balance Bike Review Rocky Mountain Reaper Review Opus Nix 20 inch Review UNCHAINED: A weekend guide for Whistler and the Bike Park The post Early Rider Trail 24 Review appeared first on The Bike Dads.

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133 - 17/04/2019 15:00:59

Push's latest suspension solution is designed increase the level of adjustability and improve the big hit performance of RockShox's Charger dampers.( Photos: 4 )

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Pinkbike
143 - 17/04/2019 10:34:20

In the “The Lab” we present the latest products and put them through their paces for you. Some undergo long-term tests, while we check others out only briefly. This time we reveal how the POC Ora Goggle fared. The large Carl Zeiss lenses of the POC Ora offer an uninterrupted field of vision.With no foam in the air vents, the Ora has excellent breathability. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); POC’s Ora goggle is designed to perfectly fit their range of helmets and comes in either DH, with pins for rip offs, or this model the trail/enduro version, which has no foam in the vents to aid airflow at slower speeds (A tear off compatible DH lens is available aftermarket for €29). POCs Carl Zeiss lenses are crisp and the Ora’s field of vision is excellent, with no frame sneaking into your peripheral vision. We rode the slightly tinted Zeiss lense in every light condition: from a six 6 hour enduro race on a hot summer’s day on open mountain – where it did a great job of cutting out glare – to the near total darkness of the deep woods in winter, where the grey tint is barely noticeable. Because the tint is subtle, It copes well with transitions from light into the shade and visa-versa, and would only be unsuitable for night riding. The subtle grey tinted lens worked well in a variety of light conditions. We used the goggle on both an open face lid for trail riding and on a full face helmet for racing and uplift days, the fit was comfortable in both applications with no pressure on the bridge of the nose. The Ora Goggles fill the gap in your helmet and give good face coverage; without the extra foam airflow was really good and we experienced much less fogging than other goggles we have used. €70 is premium pricing for a goggle, so we wanted them to last. Ultimately, the longevity of a set of goggles will require care and also some luck; with no tear-offs to protect the lens, we washed off dried mud before cleaning the lens with the bag and kept them, we experienced no issues with scratching over the test period, despite riding in some seriously muddy conditions. Whether you wear them with a trail or full-face helmet, the comfort, breathability and uninterrupted vision of the POC Ora make them a goggle that you’ll soon forget that you’re wearing: with their subtle but versatile lens tint they will become your go-to google no matter what the riding conditions. Strengths Excellent vision Weaknesses Slight tint hinders low light visibility Tester Tom Duration 5 months Price € 70 More info pocsports.com The post The Lab: POC Ora Goggle in review appeared first on ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine.

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Enduro MTB - RSS
133 - 17/04/2019 09:17:20

The 765 RS Gravel is Look‘s first dedicated gravel bike SRAM’s 1×11 Force groupset is used, but it’s a relatively tight cassette at the back Curvy, asymmetric chainstays offer tyre and chainring clearance Betting on the future — UCI approval for the gravel frame Look designs the entire front of its bike as a single system to ensure the feeling through the bars is what it desires Neat, rattle-free cable routing Decent clearance for the low-profile 37mm WTB riddler tyres Thin bar tape adds to the racy feel SRAM provides the braking via a Force caliper The e-765 RS Gravel takes inspiration from the 765 RS Gravel and the e-765 Optimum The narrow range 11-speed cassette There’s definitely clearance, just! Fazua’s bar controller is simple, if not svelte Look is speccing WTB tyres across the gravel range The 3D Wave chainstays are there to improve compliance and grip Look leaves the base of the Fazua motor naked to reduce the chance of water pooling and to keep the motor cool One side is enclosed, the other open for swift wheel changes The Fazua’s motor and bottom bracket key together with a simple mechanism This version of the 765 RS Gravel comes with a 2×11 Shimano 105 group The SRAM Force version of the 765 RS Gravel comes with a matt green paintjob Shimano Ultegra adorns this 765 RS Gravel The Drivepack contains both motor and battery SRAM Force appears on this top-level e-765 Gravel SRAM Rival provides the stop and go here Look has hit the dirt road running with a brace of gravel bikes: one man-powered, the other motor assisted. The two bikes share their DNA, with the 765 Gravel RS being a very race-focussed gravel bike, while the e-765 Gravel is a touch more relaxed but should still be quick up the hills thanks to its electric assistance. This gravel bike has a dropper and suspension Good news, now even bar tape is gravel specific Look 765 Gravel RS Neat, rattle-free cable routing Tom Marvin / Immediate Media The 765 Gravel RS plays on what Look refers to as ‘the new playground’ — gravel roads that are becoming increasingly popular to ride, especially in the US. The RS in the name stands for Racing Sport, hinting at the general demeanour of the bike. This means that there’s an increased proportion of high modulus carbon fibres in the frame’s layup, for a lighter, snappier ride. Betting on the future — UCI approval for the gravel frame Tom Marvin / Immediate Media There’s also a UCI Legal sticker just ahead of the seatpost, which could hint to the bike’s intentions. While there are no UCI sanctioned gravel races, Look believes that there could be soon in the future and therefore want a bike ready to go. Look also says the 765 Gravel RS is suitable for cyclocross. The frames weigh a reported 1.2kg with a 350g fork. Look 765 Gravel RS frame design Look has gone where a number of other gravel frames have gone before, with a dropped chainstay design. This gives Look the ability to put wider tyres in its frame and maintain the use of road cranks (and their narrower Q-factor) and up to a 50t chainring. SRAM’s 1×11 Force groupset is used, but it’s a relatively tight cassette at the back Tom Marvin / Immediate Media Tyre size is a hot topic in gravel, and Look says that the bike can run regular road-sized wheels and tyres for more road-orientated riders and easily up to 40c tyres on slightly wider 700c rims for those who want a fair mix of road and dirt. For those who want to purely hit the dirt, 650×2.1in tyres and wheels can also be fitted. These have a far larger volume for better traction and comfort but maintain a very similar outer diameter. The chainstays get the 3D Wave treatment, which we saw recently on the E765 Optimum E-Road bike that Look launched. This profile, which has two distinct curves in the tube profile, is said to offer 15 percent more compliance than a straight tube. This is handy on a gravel bike, not just for comfort over rougher terrain, but also to improve the tyre’s ability to track undulations in the road surface, thus improving traction. The 3D Wave chainstays are there to improve compliance and grip Tom Marvin / Immediate Media To make sure that the bikes are ready to get out into the wilderness there are four bottle cage mounts on the bike: three inside the main triangle and one below it. One of them is super low in the frame to improve weight distribution, which I suspect will be limited to 500ml bidons if you wish to use all four. There’s also a pair of bolts on top of the top tube for a bento box, ready for long stints in the saddle, and there are fender mounts to keep you dry too. The Look 765 RS Gravel range Three models make up the 765 RS Gravel range: The SRAM Force version of the 765 RS Gravel comes with a matt green paintjob Look Up top is the SRAM Force 1×11 bike, featuring a Force carbon crank with 42t ring and an 11-36t cassette. It comes with Force brakes, Mavic All Road Disc CL tubeless wheels with WTB Riddler 37mm tyres, Look’s finishing kit (including a 12-degree flare gravel specific bar) and Fizik Antares R7 saddle. Look will be selling this bike for €4,299. Shimano Ultegra adorns this 765 RS Gravel Look Next is a Shimano Ultegra build. This comes with a 50-34 double chainset and 11-34t cassette, and Shimano’s Ultegra hydraulic brakes. The bike rolls on Shimano RS 370 wheels and the same WTB Riddler tyres. Finishing kit is again Look and Fizik. This model comes in at €3,999. This version of the 765 RS Gravel comes with a 2×11 Shimano 105 group Look Finally, there’s a Shimano 105 group bike in very much the same format, though it’s Shimano RS 170 wheels this time, and has a price of €3,599. For our initial ride impressions of the Force level bike, scroll down! The Look e-765 Gravel The e-765 RS Gravel takes inspiration from the 765 RS Gravel and the e-765 Optimum Tom Marvin / Immediate Media Look has taken the 765 RS Gravel and the e-765 Optimum (check out the details of that here) and merged them together to create the e-765 Gravel — an electrically assisted gravel bike. Many of the features from the 765 RS Gravel can be found on the electric bike version: the 3D Wave seatstays, dropped chainstays and colour too. However, these are joined by the Fauza motor, which has impressed in the past. As with the e-765 Optimum, Look chose this motor because of its low weight and unobtrusive feel through the cranks. Look leaves the base of the Fazua motor naked to reduce the chance of water pooling and to keep the motor cool Tom Marvin / Immediate Media The motor, battery and bottom bracket system weigh around 4kg, so there’s not a massive weight penalty, and if the feeling on the bike is similar to its tarmac sibling, it shouldn’t make too much of a difference to how the bike rides. The motor has 250 watts continuous power, peaking at 400 watts, while there’s 60Nm of torque and a 250Wh battery. Four power modes are offered, though one of those is a non-assist mode. Look has had a play with the software to give a power profile that’s better suited to gravel riding, it says. There’s an associated app with the bike too. This gives you all the data you need on the battery and motor, including temperature, battery level and range. It also has mapping capabilities, including a rather smart map that will show you the range at which you’ll be able to get to and back from on one battery charge. How accurate that is in reality obviously depends on a number of factors, though. The battery and motor ‘Drivepack’ can be dropped easily out of the bike, leaving just the 1kg bottom bracket assembly behind, should you really want to go ‘au natural’! The Drivepack contains both motor and battery Tom Marvin / Immediate Media Look e-765 Gravel range There are two e-765 Gravel bikes on offer from Look. SRAM Force appears on this top-level e-765 Gravel Look There’s a SRAM Force 1×11 build, with a FSA crank featuring a 42t ring and SRAM 11-36t cassette. This bike comes with Force CX1 brakes and Mavic All Road Disc wheels with WTB Riddler 37mm tyres. Look provides the finishing kit and Fizik the Antares R7 saddle. This version costs €6,499. SRAM Rival provides the stop and go here Look There’s also a SRAM Rival 1×11 bike, following much the same pattern, though it comes with a Shimano RS 170 wheelset and a San Marco Monza saddle. This bike is priced at €5,799. Look 765 RS Gravel first ride impressions I took a quick 10km ride on the 765 RS Gravel through the vineyards of the Loire Valley to get a flavour of the bike. The first thing I noticed is that this is clearly a race-inspired design. The position on the bike feels fairly low and aggressive, and this is compounded as soon as you hit the dirt. The front of the bike — fork, head tube, stem and bars — are fairly stiff and uncompromising, which is further accentuated by the thin bar tape I had on my test bike. Thin bar tape adds to the racy feel Tom Marvin / Immediate Media This combined to give a fairly harsh initial ride. However, if I had further time to play around I’d ensure I ran the tyres tubeless, to drop pressure, and would investigate running slightly wider tyres than the 700x37c WTB Riddlers on there as stock. The tyres themselves are the Fast Rolling, Light version. Despite a relatively skinny profile and low-stack tread, I didn’t have any traction issues up loose climbs — perhaps those 3D Wave seatstays really are contributing. Decent clearance for the low-profile 37mm WTB Riddler tyres Tom Marvin / Immediate Media The drivetrain, yet again, clearly shows road inspiration, with a tight 11-36 range. With no ‘easy’ gear on there, it encourages you to attack climbs because it’s rather tricky to sit and spin. Dropping a 10-42 cassette on there shouldn’t be an issue if your chain is long enough. As I’ve often found, the faster you go over gravel the comfier it gets, and this was no different on the Look machine. It’s not the most sofa-like ride, and certainly has that aggressive edge, but it’s perfectly able to cross choppier ground and dodge potholes with its snappy, engaging handling.

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Bike Radar