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6pts - 28/02/2021 20:51:23

Posted by
The Bike Dads - RSS
12pts - 28/02/2021 20:00:48

For the last few months I’ve been spending time on Roval’s latest XC wheelset ...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
16pts - 25/02/2021 16:34:12

A full-suspension eMTB weighing 16.3 kg. Is that possible? With the new E-Caliber,...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
22pts - 25/02/2021 16:00:47

The E-Caliber is designed to give recreational XC riders the ability to feel like...

Posted by
Pinkbike
26pts - 23/02/2021 22:00:50

Don't leave home without them The post

Posted by
Mountain Bike Action
8pts - 23/02/2021 16:00:46

Love turning dials? This shock could be for you.( Photos: 7, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 23/02/2021 12:00:47

After many years on the market, the Shorty has received an update. The new, second...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
23pts - 22/02/2021 15:00:48

Four new downhill bikes put to the test in the demanding terrain surrounding Cham...

Posted by
Pinkbike
18pts - 22/02/2021 13:00:46

The Shorty's back and ready for the mud.( Photos: 6 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
4pts - 21/02/2021 04:34:14

The Specialized Butcher has been around for quite some time now, but it’s recently u...

Posted by
MTB-Mag

Latest Photos

6pts
04/02/2021
#Rant #TLDR 😅. For those that don’t know DPS stands for Double Page Spread, the holy grail for a professional mountain biker of the 2000s & something that I admired so much when flipping through magazines and growing up as an aspiring #MountainBiker in the 90s. That over time has developed into an appreciation/obsession with #photography whether that be actually shooting or just admiring it on a screen or paper. The MTB industry has some incredible photog’s and some rad up and comers, some of my faves listed at the end of this rant.. . Aannnnyway, I’ve been HELLA choked on this for a while and I want to preface with this- I have an appreciation for what @pinkbike has done to elevate the sport as a whole, it’s really impressive from a business perspective how they’ve been able to scale, anticipate and not only stay relevant but grow with the trends, so kudos there. BUUUUT when a non-paid #photostory goes “live” on their site there is just about nothing that crushes my soul 😖 more than to see a photo that someone has put the time & effort to capture & edit for it to be displayed at anything but full browser size.. BRO.. At that point we all may as well just look at the images on our phones 😔😢. I understand that that’s pretty much what most are doing anyways, but maaaan.. I get that it’s all about ad spend.. Aaand I have a few good friends at PB.. So no hate, just a point of view from someone who lives both sides of the spectrum. . Having said all that, the launching of @betamtb makes me smile, nice see mtb+photography+art as their focus and I would suggest anyone who appreciates those to take a look at what they’ve got cookin’ ✌️••• 📸 @jillkintner. . @svenmartinphoto @maddogboris @margusriga @iancollinsphotography @satchscratch @parisgore @viktorfotomaker @garyperkin @paul_bliss @davetrumporephoto @nathhughesphoto @timbardsleysmith @tobycowley @eye_b_long @aledilullophotography @mattiasfredrikssonphotography @eyeroam @jayfrench @meagherdude @peterjamisonmedia @isaacwallenn @laurence_ce @the4color @jbliautard
6 - 28/02/2021 20:51:23

The AIR addition came soon after the original OFF with a promise of quality front suspension air fork for a $200 price increase. Did Woom deliver? You bet, at this price more kids are going to access mountain biking on a quality bike that will hook these future little rippers into the sport. Woom Off AIR Details: Intended Age- 5 to 14 (available in 20, 24 and 26 inch sizes) Weight- 20, 22 & 24 lbs Features- alloy frame, RST air fork with compression and rebound adjustments 15mm thru axle, 2.25 inch tires, 68/69 degree head angle, top quality parts build MSRP- $869-899 USD Available- Woom The Bike Dads' Take: "The fork is of great quality and comes through for the lightest of riders to run decent air pressures and have premium external compression and rebound adjustments. Get some lock-on grips and add a quick release and little Jane or Johnny will be off to the single-track. The weight and build quality are top notch and make this bike tough to beat for a kids introductory xc mountain bike. " -Colin Recent Blog Posts $5 DIY Bike Storage Rack 24 inch full suspension mountain bike buyers guide microSHIFT Acolyte: World’s cheapest MTB clutch derailleur drivetrain! MTB child seat round up: Mac Ride, Shotgun and more! Sam Pilgrim shows how to ride a kids bike! The Lil Shredder Icon: the best 16″ of all time? Press Release: Kommit retractable tow rope is here The Porter Kids Shred Berm Peak! The Ultimate Tow Rope Round-up! Must Watch: Christmas light Trail! The post Woom off AIR 4, 5, and 6 Review appeared first on The Bike Dads.

Posted by
The Bike Dads - RSS
12 - 28/02/2021 20:00:48

For the last few months I’ve been spending time on Roval’s latest XC wheelset – an engineering marvel dubbed the Control SL. Tipping the scales at just 1,240 grams (actual) they are shockingly light – even for a high end race wheelset. Upon first hearing that figure, most might assume that the weight savings came from a stripped down rim that could buckle if you looked at it the wrong way. In reality, quite the contrary as the rim is surprisingly robust and boasts much beefier dimensions than your average XC rim. So how did Roval the weight down so damn low, and how did they hold up under real world riding? Read on to find out… Details Carbon fiber rims 29″ only 24 spoke front and rear 2-cross lacing all around 1,240 grams (verified) 29mm inner diameter 294mm spoke lengths all around SiNC ceramic sealed cartridge bearings 275 lb. weight limit Bladed DT Swiss Aerolite straight pull spokes DT Swiss Pro Lock alloy nipples Valves, plug holes and tape included XD, HG and MS drivers DT Swiss EXP Ratchet internals No-Fault crash replacement policy / Lifetime warranty Handbuilt $2,500 USD I’m not sure what the more impressive aspect is – the rims or the hubs – but we’ll start with the rims. Roval went with rather wide 29mm inner diameter and compared to the last iteration, they’ve reduced the height of the rim to make it more compliant, amongst other things. Perhaps one of the most intriguing (and brilliant) design highlights is that the bead wall is 4mm thick at the top. As you can see in the photo above, the rim dramatically widens where it meets the tire. By broadening this surface, the likelihood of pinch flatting is greatly reduced. This is simply due to the reality that a more blunt surface is less able to cut through the tire. In simple terms they put added material where it is most crucial, but not anywhere else. Another update to the rim profile is that it has been given a more dramatically asymmetrical profile to provide better bracing angles at the spokes. This helps balance the wheel’s strength from side to side and leads to a more robust, durable wheel overall. If you assumed most of the weight savings came from the rim’s redesign, you’d be mistaken. A substantial chunk of weight has been taken out of the hubs. The ultra low flanges use straight pull spokes – 24 of them front and rear, to be precise. Roval managed to design the hub dimensions so that only one spoke length is needed on all four sides. This is always a bonus for upkeep, builds and emergencies – but to pull it off while simultaneously shedding so much weight is more laudable still. No excess material is the mantra. Note the relief around the inside of the 6-bolt rotor mount. Also worth a call out, Centerlock fitment is also available. If that end cap looks funny, your eyes do not deceive you. The standard end caps don’t look so tiny next to the hub shell – the one pictured above is for the RockShox Torque Cap version, which is included with the wheelset. In short, Torque Caps help improve torsional rigidity at the fork/hub interface. On the topic of the front hub, the main way it lost a great deal of grams was by forgoing a separate internal axle. Rather, the bearings – which are ceramic – press right into the hub shell directly and mate directly to the fork’s 15mm axle. The hubs share many of DT Swiss’ ultra lightweight 180 hub parts. Inside the driver body is the new, improved and simplified Ratchet EXP 36T, an engagement mechanism that uses DT’s legendary star ratchet system for tool free access and rebuilds. On the trail I initially caught wind of the new wheelset last Spring, which was around the time of the Specialized Epic EVO’s launch. Upon chatting with some contacts at Specialized I expressed hesitation as to how tough these new hoops would be after hearing the weight. They informed me that as part of their testing, Curtis Keene had been riding them on his Enduro for months with no issues. **Let’s be clear – that is NOT what they’re intended for and doing such things will likely void your warranty.** The point is, this came from people I know firsthand and trust quite well, so it serves as a testimony to their strength. I’ll get to my findings later, but first let’s discuss ride characteristics. Starting with setup, I opted for the standard rim tape as opposed to the plugs, which do save some weight if you have the patience to install them. I began with more XC oriented tires on my Transition Spur, but as bad conditions came about with Winter I opted for Schwalbe Magic Mary tires in search of more traction. That might sound like overkill, but I was running them in lighter duty ~840 gram casings. Anyhow, I generally have kept the pressure in the 23 front / 25 rear PSI range and have had zero flats and no burps. All of the tires mounted up tubeless in a snap, with a floor pump. The first thing I noticed was the weight, or lack thereof. Rotational weight reduction, ie: in your wheels or tires, provides you with benefits that you’ll feel far more than weight saved on the frame or other parts. In any case, the best analogy would be like having extra power or better fitness – there’s simply no other way to describe it. Yes the Control SL’s are expensive but they deliver far more of an improved feel than something like a fancy set of lightweight cranks. Aside from the ease with which you can just spin your way through long days in the saddle, you really feel this aspect when you have to quickly get up to speed and accelerate through a steep, technical section or trail where gravity, stability and traction is working against you. Once I pointed the bike downhill I was taken aback by the rigidity and precision in handling that was on offer. Looking at the hubs’ short spoke flanges and factoring in the low spoke count I assumed that these wheels would be a bit on the flexy side, but I was completely proven wrong. While this nods toward a really well designed rim, put it this way – I’ve ridden mid duty (read: Trail/AM) rated carbon fiber wheels that were substantially more flexy than these, while being a solid pound heavier. Regarding vertical compliance, I’d rate the Control SL wheelset somewhere in the middle of the road. There’s nothing inherent in their design that makes them take the edge off quite like a crankbrothers Synthesis rim or a Zipp 3ZeroMoto, but they don’t beat you up by any means. From an engineering standpoint, I’m not sure very much “give” could be baked into a wheelset this stripped down anyway. All in all, I had no complaints in that arena whatsoever. For a premium wheelset, one thing seems to be conspicuously missing – a fast engagement. As these wheels use DT Swiss internals, they steer toward the brand’s latest direction. With the announcement of the new EXP system, DT has taken the stance that ultra fast engagements have drawbacks, mainly in the form of exacerbating how much pedal kickback you feel as you cycle through the suspension. On short travel bikes, this is less of a glaring issue and you can upgrade to a 54T star ratchet should you choose – although spending more money to “upgrade” a $2,500 wheelset could be annoying. Personally, I am used to pretty quick engagement and I enjoy instant power out of a corner as much as anyone. That said, once I was on trail the slight lag occupied precisely zero percent of my attention span – but that’s just me. As far as maintenance and durability is concerned, I was super impressed with the bearings. Seeing as they are high end (read: expensive) ceramic bearings, one should expect and settle for nothing less than perfection. Anyhow, after many months of hard use in inclement weather and heavy washings after most rides, they’re spinning as smoothly as they did on day one. Regarding the driver body, the new design of the EXP drive cannot be completely disassembled without the use of a special tool, but for the purpose of occasional tear downs you simply tug on the cassette and that exposes the system. You can clean and repack the drive mechanism with a shop towel and the appropriate grease in a couple of minutes. I did this a handful of times throughout and things are running great. Overall What’s most remarkable about the Control SL wheelset is not solely their staggeringly light weight – an engineering feat of its own – but the fact that they also manage to boast a seriously impressive ride quality on trail. As of the time of writing this, I’ve pointed them into many a rock garden with complete disregard and cased many a decent sized jump with zero consequence. I haven’t gotten a single flat and they haven’t come even a smidge out of round or true. I’ve also not managed to break a spoke – by the way, it’s worth noting they come with spares. With all of that in mind, if there’s one thing I know about carbon fiber wheels it’s that they can just “go” sometimes and it’s usually when you least expect it. Fortunately this wheelset is backed up by a very strong warranty program, so you can rest assured in your investment. Now, lastly we do have to contend with the price tag and the value aspect. As complete carbon fiber wheelsets creep down in price, $2,500 is a hell of a lot of money. This reminds me of the old adage: “Strong, Light, Cheap – pick two”. Well, the Control SL’s sure are light and they are damn strong…If you’re a rider who can afford these, they are, in a single word transformative. For me, I pulled a set of pretty damn good DT Swiss XC wheels off of my Spur and when I put the Control SL’s on the bike became a completely different animal – simply put, it’s faster and handles much better. The wheelset’s quality is not the question – really it’s all just a matter of if you can spend that kind of money on a set of hoops. If you can and do, you certainly won’t regret it because it doesn’t get much better than this. www.rovalcomponents.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
16 - 25/02/2021 16:34:12

A full-suspension eMTB weighing 16.3 kg. Is that possible? With the new E-Caliber, 9.9 XTR 2021 and its FAZUA motor, Trek say YES! But does it make sense? We have had the exclusive test of the € 12,000 Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 in Italy. We tell you what the ultralight race bike is capable of and whether XC-ebikes even make sense! XC is part and parcel of mountain biking. The discipline gained its seal of approval in the ’90s when it was accepted as a sport in the ’96 Summer Olympics. For XC (short for cross country), efficiency, acceleration and endurance are the main priorities. Analogue XC bikes are characterised by their efficient ride and competitively low weight. They’re less suited to comfortable off-road riding due to their aggressive riding position, stiff suspension and lightweight builds. If you’re not an XC pro, it’s usually ill-advised to take on overly challenging trails with all those lightweight components, which only provide a limited margin for error and safety. As such, XC bikes continue to carve out their own, separate niche. Trek think that XC riding is under-represented in the ebike segment and has set about giving it more attention. The American brand already has a thoroughbred analogue racehorse in its stable in the form of the Trek Supercaliber, but in Trek’s eyes, there’s a large gap between lightweight XC bikes and eMTBs with powerful assistance, that is yet to be filled. The idea isn’t a new one. FOCUS previously presented an XC ebike prototype equipped with a FAZUA motor in 2016, though this was a hardtail. The FOCUS Raven² went into production in 2017 but didn’t experience massive popularity. Nonetheless, we were quite enthusiastic about the concept of a, for the time, genuinely lightweight eMTB, though it’s limits quickly became apparent. Can Trek open up the market with the new E-Caliber? Made for the podium? The new Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR in detail Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR | FAZUA Evation/250 Wh | 120/60 mm (f/r)16.3 kg (size L) | € 11,999 | Manufacturer’s website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Trek’s analogue Supercaliber was the mentor for the development of the E-Caliber. Like its counterpart, the electric version pursues the same goal of combining the efficient propulsion and low weight of a hardtail with the increased reserves provided by a fully. To put the concept into reality Trek have relied on their IsoStrut technology featured on the Supercaliber, which see the frame become part of the kinematics. The thin seat stays provide enough flex in the rear end to make Trek’s well-known Active Braking Pivot (ABP) on the rear axle superfluous, allowing weight to be saved. The 60 mm travel is controlled by the IsoStrut shock, developed in collaboration with FOX, integrated into the underside of the top tube. The IsoStrut turns the ebike into a mix between a hardtail and fully. The frame has a sharp silhouette and the difference in proportions between the super thin seat stays and the wide down tube definitely draw attention. The paint job exudes race flair but, for individualists, can also be configured to your tastes in Trek’s ProjectOne configurator. Cable ports on both sides behind the head tube route cables internally. However, from the rider’s perspective, the cabling around the cockpit is hectic, despite the missing dropper post lever, with a tangle of cables remaining for the motor remote and lockout. For individualists, Trek offer the option to change the finish to suit your own tastes in their ProjectOne configurator. At the front of the head tube, more cables come together than at your local telephone exchange. The thin seat stays offer enough flex to generate the 60 mm travel that is controlled by the IsoStrut shock. Two bikes in one? The FAZUA Evation system in the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 For the motor, the American brand has gone with the FAZUA Evation drive which offers many advantages compared to the big players in the motor business. In our big motor group test, the FAZUA unit stood out with its low weight and can even, wait for it, be removed from the frame within seconds. The motor and battery form a 3.36 kg, removable unit, with only the lightweight gearbox between the cranks fixed in the frame. The motor-battery unit can be replaced with a hollow 600 g cover which also doubles as a generous storage compartment. That lets the ebike be ridden as a non-motorised one too, with its riding character coming even closer to that of an XC bike. A further unique feature of the FAZUA motor is the practically non-existent pedalling resistance of the gearbox. That’s noticeable, or much more imperceptible, when you ride with the motor turned off or hit speeds above the 25 km/h assistance limit. The transition at that 25 km/h limit is also very natural. On the other hand, the loud clack of the gearbox freewheel as it re-engages is less smooth. Without the battery and motor but with the cover in place, the E-Caliber is just under 2.7 kg lighter and can be ridden like an analogue bike. You get two bikes for the price of one, very, very expensive bike. Built-in beatbox: the battery and motor can be removed from the frame but the gearbox stays in place. It doesn’t have any perceptible pedalling resistance but clacks audibly when its freewheel engages. Without a battery and motor the frame offers masses of storage space. Alongside the FAZUA motor, the Trek is also equipped with the new FAZUA Remote bX and the updated 250X battery with a 252 Wh capacity. Like before, the battery can only be charged off the bike but no longer has to be removed to be turned on. Now, the system can now be comfortably activated via the remote. The new bX remote has a sleek touch interface that can be easily operated even while wearing gloves. However, we did miss the haptic feedback of physical buttons and often had to look down to check the coloured LEDs to see which assistance mode we were currently in. FAZUA deliver their system with Breeze, River and Rocket modes preconfigured. In Breeze mode, the motor delivers a constant 100 Watts. For heavy and very aggressive riders this is hardly detectable. In the progressive River mode, the motor output modulates based on how much effort you’re putting in, though is limited to 210 Watts. In Rocket mode, the motor gives everything it has and increases its output to the maximum 55 Nm torque quickly. With its comparatively low torque and lower maximum power, the motor sits behind Bosch, Brose and Shimano but is more than sufficient for this kind of bike in the majority of situations, fitting the character of an XC bike perfectly. Nonetheless, if you don’t get on with the motor’s handling, you won’t necessarily have to switch to the competition. In terms of connectivity and individualisation, some big manufacturers could learn a thing or two here. With FAZUA’s Toolbox Software 2.0 desktop software, individual assistance mode can be comprehensively tuned to fit your requirements. Alongside the maximum output, the relationship between rider input and motor output, as well as the ramp-up of the motor power for the individual modes can be adjusted. While the Trek E-Caliber eschews a display and only communicates the battery charge and assistance mode via coloured LEDs, if you want more detailed information, you can connect your smartphone, Garmin, Wahoo or other computers via Bluetooth to the remote, giving you an expanded interface on your external display. When light isn’t light enough – The spec of the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 The spec of the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR subjects itself unquestioningly to the overall concept and contributes to the low weight of the bike. However, to achieve that impressive number, the top-of-the-range model E-Caliber we tested has had to accept some significant compromises in off-road performance with partly questionable component choices. While the three cheapest entry-level models come equipped with a dropper post, the two high-end models come with conventional carbon seatposts. For one thing, that’s a pity because the 270 mm seatpost insertion depth available for size L would be well-suited to a dropper. It’s even more of a shame because Trek claim the E-Caliber is supposed to be ready for more demanding descents than the Supercaliber – but more on this when we talk about the geometry. Weight has been shaved in the wrong place here as lightweight fetishists would no doubt choose the analogue Supercaliber anyway. Even without a motor and battery, the E-Caliber still weighs 16.3 kg. The same applies to the FOX Factory 34 Step-Cast fork with its 120 mm travel. It works perfectly for lightweight riders or on flowing trails but starts struggling to hold its line underneath heavy riders or through rougher terrain. Four-piston Shimano XTR brakes with ICE TECH pads and rotors also find their place on the build. Up front, the rotor is 200 mm large, at the rear just 180 mm and we would have felt more secure on long descents with a larger disc. For the rest of the build, lots of components come from Trek’s in-house brand Bontrager which score across the board with their high quality. Solely the lightweight Bontrager Kovee XXX carbon wheels in combination with the fragile Bontrager XR3 Team Issue tires on our test bikes left us with mixed feelings. They contribute significantly to the light-footed acceleration of the E-Caliber XTR 9.9 but don’t fill us with confidence that they’ll survive rough sections unscathed in the long run, particularly if you want to ride sensibly low tire pressures. The top-end models eschew a dropper post in favour of maximum weight savings. What contributes to an impressive weight on paper leads to significant restriction of freedom of movement on the trail. The lightweight Bontrager XR3 Team Issue tires on the Kovee XXX carbon rims ensure low rolling resistance and good acceleration. Grip and protection are limited though. Up front, the FOX 34 Step-Cast fork delivers 120 mm travel. Unfortunately, for demanding trail use and heavy riders it’s under dimensioned. The four-piston Shimano XTR brakes are a good choice… … but the 180 mm rotor at the rear is overwhelmed when faced with heavy riders and long descents. Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR€ 11,999SpecificationsMotor FAZUA Evation 55 NmBattery FAZUA Evation 252X 250 WhDisplay -Fork FOX 34 Factory Step-Cast FIT4 mit Remote 120 mmRear Shock Trek IsoStrut, FOX Performance shock 60 mmSeatpost Bontrager XXX Brakes Shimano XTR M9120 200/180 mmDrivetrain Shimano XTR 1x12Stem Bontrager Kovee Pro 70 mmHandlebar Bontrager Line Pro 750 mmWheelset Bontrager Kovee XXX 29"Tires Bontrager XR3 Team Issue 2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 16.3 kg Other builds As is typical for Trek, high-end builds are offered with both Shimano and SRAM components. The entry-level model starts at € 6,799 while you’ll leave your Trek dealer with the luxury build, equipped with wireless SRAM Eagle AXS shifting, for € 12,999. Trek E-Caliber 9.6€ 6,799SpecificationsMotor FAZUA Evation 55 NmBattery FAZUA Evation 252X 250 WhDisplay -Fork RockShox 35 Gold RL 120 mmRear Shock Trek IsoStrut, FOX Factory shock 60 mmSeatpost TranzX JD 100–130 mmBrakes Shimano MT4100 Drivetrain Shimano DEORE/XT 1x12Stem Bontrager Rhythm Comp 60–70 mmHandlebar Bontrager Comp 720–750 mmWheelset Bontrager Kovee Comp 29"Tires Bontrager XR3 Team Issue2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 18.49 kg (Info by Trek in size M) Trek E-Caliber 9.8 GX€ 8,399SpecificationsMotor FAZUA Evation 55 NmBattery FAZUA Evation 252X 250 WhDisplay -Fork RockShox SID Select+ 120 mmRear Shock Trek IsoStrut, FOX Factory shock 60 mmSeatpost Bontrager Line Elite Dropper 100–150 mmBrakes SRAM G2 RSC Drivetrain SRAM GX-Eagle 1x12Stem Bontrager Kovee Pro 60–70 mmHandlebar Bontrager Line Pro 750 mmWheelset Bontrager Kovee Pro 29"Tires Bontrager XR3 Team Issue 2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 16.99 kg (Info by Trek in size M) Trek E-Caliber 9.8 XT€ 8,399SpecificationsMotor FAZUA Evation 55 NmBattery FAZUA Evation 252X 250 WhDisplay -Fork RockShox SID Select+ 120 mmRear Shock Trek IsoStrut, FOX Factory shock 60 mmSeatpost Bontrager Line Elite Dropper 100–150 mmBrakes Shimano XT Drivetrain Shimano XT 1x12Stem Bontrager Kovee Pro 60–70 mmHandlebar Bontrager Line Pro 750 mmWheelset Bontrager Kovee Pro 29"Tires Bontrager XR3 Team Issue 2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 16.94 kg (Info by Trek in size M) Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XX1 AXS€ 12,999SpecificationsMotor FAZUA Evation 55 NmBattery FAZUA Evation 252X 250 WhDisplay -Fork RockShox SID Ultimate 120 mmRear Shock Trek IsoStrut, FOX Factory shock 60 mmSeatpost Bontrager XXX Brakes Shimano XTR M9120 Drivetrain SRAM XX1 Eagle AXS 1x12Stem Bontrager Kovee Pro 60–70 mmHandlebar Bontrager Line Pro 750 mmWheelset Bontrager Kovee XXX 29"Tires Bontrager XR3 Team Issue 2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 15.77 kg (Info by Trek in size M) Supercaliber PLUS – The geometry of the E-Caliber 9.9 XTR in detail The Trek E-Caliber’s measurements are guided by the proven Supercaliber platform. Nonetheless, the engineers have made a few modifications to allow fast XC riders to feel more comfortable at high speeds. At 67.5°, the head tube angle of the E-Caliber is 1.5° slacker than the Supercaliber. The reach across all sizes is between 0.5 and 1.5 cm longer than the Supercaliber and the stack increases by between 1.5 and 2.8 cm compared to the analogue counterpart. The E-Caliber is available in four sizes between S and XL. A Mino Link, as found on many Trek bikes to adjust geometry, isn’t present here. Size S M L XL Seat tube 394 mm 419 mm 470 mm 508 mm Top tube 580 mm 617 mm 648 mm 670 mm Head tube 90 mm 100 mm 105 mm 110 mm Head angle 67.5° 67.5° 67.5° 67.5° Seat angle 72.3° 72.6° 72.8° 72.8° Chainstay 447 mm 447 mm 447 mm 447 mm BB Drop 50 mm 50 mm 50 mm 50 mm Wheelbase 1,126 mm 1,165 mm 1,197 mm 1,219 mm Reach 405 mm 440 mm 470 mm 490 mm Stack 609 mm 618 mm 622 mm 627 mm googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Fast uphill, exactly 25 km/h on the flats and slow downhill – First ride review of the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 We shot along the best XC tracks in Tuscany aboard the Trek E-Caliber, where many pros and several World Champions regularly train. We went on tours and, of course, tested the bike on our favourite local trails around Stuttgart to gather our first impressions of this new breed of ebike. Getting on it, it’s immediately clear that the riding position of the E-Caliber differs from the usual aggressive racing position of the analogue XC bikes we know. The wide bars and higher front puts less stress on the arms and back, theoretically making the E-Caliber suited to tours as well. However, in practice, the build and the very specific concept limits the bike’s suitability here – more on this later. With the first push on the pedals and with maximum motor support, you feel like an XC pro, fuelled with carbs after a pasta fest. The E-Caliber surges forward lightly and in the lower assistance modes, the motor contributes to the job at hand, staying unobtrusively in the background. In the dynamic and easily modulated River mode, it’s easy to accelerate out of corners. Here the E-Caliber can show off its racing flair and is a lot of fun. The 25 km/h assistance limit is reached after just a few pedal strokes and the motor fades its assistance away very naturally. The riding position of the E-Caliber is more relaxed than the first glance might suggest. No, we aren’t lost. Some nice places in Tuscany are only to be found if you know the hidden paths well. If you’re riding with a quicker group of riders and are on the E-Caliber then, if you’re in Europe, you’ve drawn the short straw – above 25 km/h the weight penalty over analogue XC bikes has to be compensated for by your own power. In places like the USA, where the motor is allowed to assist up to 32 km/h, you’ll be much better placed to keep up with the pack. The stiff suspension of the E-Caliber is fairly neutral. Even with uneven pedalling that would usually elicit bobbing from the suspension, the consistent support of the FAZUA motor ensures that this is compensated with constant tension on the chain, reducing suspension bob. Here the E-Caliber even outshines its analogue sibling, the Supercaliber. However, the grip to activate the lockout could have been spared and the efficient rear end and 60 mm travel IsoStrut damper are only there to take the spikes out of impact, even when fully open. They generate neither much comfort nor do they help the rear wheel gain significant amounts of traction on uneven terrain. That becomes clear as soon as you take the E-Caliber up a climb, where it feels more like a hardtail. Uphill with the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 Flowing trails uphill are the E-Caliber’s speciality, where it’s exceptionally fast. As long as there’s enough grip, the FAZUA system can make full use of its power and the light-footed E-Caliber responds to every steering input along winding trails. As the climbs get steeper, the E-Caliber leaves its comfort zone. The front wheel lifts quite early and the front has to be weighted actively so that you stay in contact with the ground, don’t lose traction and continue to hold the line you envisaged. As the FAZUA motor doesn’t deliver the same power as motors in the Bosch league, the rider has to be more active and get out of the saddle on numerous occasions. Nonetheless, over steps, you have to be careful to modulate your power sensitively to avoid the rear wheel spinning out. The lightweight and low-profile Bontrager XR3 Team Issue tires just aren’t designed for maximum grip, instead focussing on efficiency and low rolling resistance. You also can’t rely on extra traction from the suspension, which is generally too stiff to keep the rear wheel stuck to the ground. Uphill flowing sections is where the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 is completely in its element. Helmet Giro Synthe MIPS | Glasses Uvex Sportstyle 228 | Jacket Specialized Deflect Swat | Jersey 100% R Core | Shorts 100% Celium | Shoes Five Ten Kestrel Lace | Socks Stance The Trek E-Caliber downhill Having arrived at the top of the trail, rather than settling into the bars, you’ll first reach for the multi-tool in your jersey. Our top-end model doesn’t have a dropper post, meaning the carbon seatpost has to be lowered manually. Only practised XC racers can deal with a high saddle and the lacking freedom of movement that entails. On flowing and not all too technical or steep descents, the Trek E-Caliber rides similarly to a manoeuvrable hardtail and does well at moderate speeds. The stiff rear provides lots of support to generate speed through rollers and other features when riding actively. The additional mass of the motor and battery have little impact and the E-Caliber can be easily manoeuvred by beginners with no surprises in the handling. As the trails get more demanding, the weight-conscious components quickly put a damper on the fun. Without a dropped saddle, the freedom of movement aboard the Trek E-Caliber is severely restricted. The lightweight FOX 34 Step-Cast fork tends to flex when ridden by heavier riders or ridden aggressively, resulting in imprecise handling when changing direction quickly, braking hard or on technical terrain. The lightweight tires again entail a compromise, this time between having enough air pressure to prevent punctures and finding traction on the trail. The small disc rotor on the rear is pushed to its limit on sustained descents by heavy riders. In contrast to conventional fullys, the stiff rear end doesn’t give up its travel willingly and only starts moving under big impacts, like steps, only preventing you from being bucked off the pedals. On steep terrain, the missing dropper post limits freedom of movement significantly. The lightweight components also convey a limited sense of security. For jumps, you can rely on the support of the rear end. However, it doesn’t deliver a comfortable ride. The IsoStrut shock only absorbs the peak forces from big impacts while riding. Don’t expect sensitive or plush comfort. Tuning tip: fit a dropper post! Who and who isn’t the new Trek E-Caliber XTR 9.9 for? The development of an E-XC bike is a bold and, without a doubt, costly step for Trek. The brand wouldn’t have gone down this path if they couldn’t count on a suitable customer base. As such, who is the Trek E-Caliber for? In all honesty, answering this question is quite hard. One thing is clear: it’s a fairly niche target audience. Here are our insights: The XC-ebike concept is a bold step for Trek. The Trek E-Caliber we tested is suited to XC-pros who want to achieve a training load during easy training or rest phases that wouldn’t be possible in the same way on an analogue XC bike. For example, an E-XC bike would make training at a constant effort possible, with the motor assistance modulating its support based on the heart rate. Unfortunately, the E-Caliber and FAZUA system are missing this functionality, which does already exist for the Specialized Levo SL. Truth be told, the size of this audience is likely thinner than the Lycra worn at sunny XC races. The second target group could be ambitious XC riders who can’t yet match the speed of experienced and stronger riders without support. Here, Trek could position the E-Caliber as the big equaliser that allows riders of different abilities to ride together, with the motor compensating for differences in power output. However, here the XC-ebike will face the same fate as E-road bikes, which have to struggle with the 25 km/h assistance limit in Europe and have only disadvantages compared to analogue bikes at higher speeds. Riders on the search for a lightweight ebike with a marathon feeling for long riders could find their money’s worth with the Trek E-Caliber. That means the Trek could also present a viable alternative to the E-gravel bike. While with its limited and natural support the Caliber has qualities well-suited to discovering new terrain, the aggressive geometry and position engender disadvantages for long-distance comfort. On top of that, the weight-conscious components mean that any riders that aren’t featherweights will face challenges on difficult terrain. Besides, the competition in the Light eMTB category is already at an extremely high level, for example in the form of the Specialized Levo SL and the Orbea Rise. Even if they’re not the most obvious competition from the specs, the weight increase for these is less than a kilogram, though their range of applications is significantly expanded! If you’re looking for an ebike with a marathon feeling for quick post-work rides on gravel track and easy trails, you might have found a suitable platform, as long as the price doesn’t represent a barrier. We just can’t predict whether the E-Caliber will be a bestseller or will languish on the shop floor Looking for something hot, new and sexy? The Trek E-Caliber is somehow special and not every ebike concept has to be based on rational choices. It’s ok for it to be just sexy or inspiring. What do you think? Maybe you have an idea of what you need an E-XC-bike for. If you do, we’d be happy to hear your feedback about the new Trek E-Caliber. Our impressions of the Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 With the E-Caliber 9.9 XTR, Trek have entered the uncertain market of XC-ebikes, whose potential has not yet been proven. The top-end model we tested here is uncompromisingly specced for weight savings but this significantly limits where it can be used. On easy, flowing trails or the quick post-work lap on gravel it will wow marathon enthusiasts into a smile with its motor support. On demanding terrain or for heavier riders, the bike quickly reaches its limits. Apart from its niche application, we think the spirit and purpose of an XC-ebike are very limited. Other Light eMTBs might seem completely different based on their specs but offer a much wider range of uses for the money, especially for those who are looking for a lightweight and touring-capable eMTB. Topslight-footed handlingappealing and customisable motor conceptlook with guaranteed race flair Flopslimited range of applicationweak trail performancemissing dropper posthigh price For more information visit trekbikes.com Der Beitrag Trek E-Caliber 9.9 XTR 2021 first ride review – An ultralight eMTB for XC use? erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
22 - 25/02/2021 16:00:47

The E-Caliber is designed to give recreational XC riders the ability to feel like a World Cup level pro.( Photos: 8, Comments: 1 )

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26 - 23/02/2021 22:00:50

Don't leave home without them The post First Look: Lezyne Tubeless and Tool Insert Kit appeared first on Mountain Bike Action Magazine.

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Mountain Bike Action
8 - 23/02/2021 16:00:46

Love turning dials? This shock could be for you.( Photos: 7, Comments: 1 )

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2 - 23/02/2021 12:00:47

After many years on the market, the Shorty has received an update. The new, second-generation MAXXIS Shorty has been developed together with successful MTB riders and has received several interesting innovations. We show you all the information about the available sizes, rubber compounds and our first ride impressions. The MAXXIS Shorty is well-known as a mid-spike tire for winter slop and dusty conditions, bridging the gap between the mud-specific Wetscream race tire and the MAXXIS ASSEGAI. The first version of the Shorty was released in 2014 and after more than six years of service, it is to be replaced by a second generation. The MAXXIS Shorty Gen 2 receives a new tread pattern, slimmer casing and added sipes in the tread for better braking and cornering traction, lower weight and improved mud-shedding abilities. You can find out about all the changes directly from our sister magazine ENDURO, as well as how the new MAXXIS Shorty handles on the trail. Der Beitrag The new MAXXIS Shorty Gen 2 first ride review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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23 - 22/02/2021 15:00:48

Four new downhill bikes put to the test in the demanding terrain surrounding Champéry, Switzerland.( Photos: 43 )

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