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19pts
29/05/2020

Latest Articles

2pts - 13 hours ago

POC spins to win with its moderately priced Axion helmet.

Posted by
Bike Mag
12pts - 29/05/2020 19:17:15

We offer our first impressions on the beautiful and...

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
10pts - 29/05/2020 07:34:14

A short-of-all-rides, the C5 is a comfort-oriented piece of equipment sure to make its way in...

Posted by
Bike Mag
10pts - 29/05/2020 06:34:14

Norco’s Sight lands squarely between the Optic and Range, putting it technically in ...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
9pts - 28/05/2020 17:17:15

Getting the best mountain bike tyres for the ...

Posted by
Bike Radar
4pts - 28/05/2020 13:51:14

Der Beitrag

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
14pts - 28/05/2020 07:51:13

I’m not really a hydration pack person. If I have the opportunity to don a bottle and a hip p...

Posted by
Bike Mag
14pts - 26/05/2020 16:00:46

The latest Roval wheels are said to be stronger and less likely to cut your tire,...

Posted by
Pinkbike
10pts - 26/05/2020 05:00:48

A few months...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
2pts - 25/05/2020 15:34:15

Without a doubt, the Lapierre eZesty is one of the initiators of the light eMTB ca...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine

Latest Photos

2 - 13 hours ago

POC spins to win with its moderately priced Axion helmet.

Posted by
Bike Mag
12 - 29/05/2020 19:17:15

We offer our first impressions on the beautiful and impressive Zero Motorcycles SR/S electric motorcycle in advance of our full review in the August 2020 issue of Electric Bike Action.   www.zeromotocycles.com The post 2020 ZERO MOTORCYCLES SR/S FIRST LOOK VIDEO appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
19pts
29/05/2020
10 - 29/05/2020 07:34:14

A short-of-all-rides, the C5 is a comfort-oriented piece of equipment sure to make its way into your regular riding apparel rotation.

Posted by
Bike Mag
10 - 29/05/2020 06:34:14

Norco’s Sight lands squarely between the Optic and Range, putting it technically in the “All Mountain” category and making it the most bread and butter mountain bike in the Canadian brand’s lineup – you could say it’s the closest thing they have to a one and done bike. The Sight is available in either wheel size, with aluminum or carbon fiber frames in a broad range of spec levels for both men’s and women’s models. Norco even offers a “build your ride” custom option as well as a frameset. This Spring I spent some time on the C1 version with 29″ wheels at home in the Santa Cruz area… Details 29″ (tested) or 27.5″ wheels 160mm front travel / 150mm rear travel Metric 185mm x 52.5mm trunnion shock Boost hub spacing 42mm fork offset 5 year warranty 32.1lbs. (our scale) $6,697 USD Starting with suspension, on this particular build things are entrusted to RockShox with a 160mm Lyrik Ultimate RC2 up front. High and low speed compression and a single rebound adjustment are externally tunable with a short 42mm offset to match the slack 64º head angle. Out back is the Super Deluxe Select Plus with a 3-way lockout and a single rebound adjuster. The rear shock has just 52.5mm of stroke supporting 150mm of wheel travel, which is a rather high leverage ratio. More on that later… More RockShox kit is featured in the form of the latest iteration of the Reverb dropper seatpost along with a 1X style lever and 175mm of travel and a beefy 34.9mm diameter. The latest version features “vent valve” so you can easily purge any air that has mixed with the oil in the system and thus ridding it of any soggy feeling and starting fresh. In short, it’s a much improved Reverb. Perched above it is the Ergon SM10 Sport saddle, which wasn’t the best, nor the worst saddle I’ve used. Up front, the bike comes with a sturdy Deity Racepoint aluminum handlebar. It has a 35mm bulge, 25mm of rise and comes in at a full 800mm width. No pictured are a couple of parts that I swapped out. The Sight arrived with a 40mm Norco house brand stem, which I had no complaints with, but simply preferred a longer 50mm stem. It arrived with Ergon grips which I flat out didn’t get along with and just put on some tried and true ODI Longnecks. SRAM’s excellent Code RSC brakes handle the stopping with a 200mm front and 180mm rear Centerline rotors, which are just the right size for a bike of this stature. Adjustable reach and bite point are nice for dialing the perfect feel, and the 4 piston calipers delivered plenty of power with a nice modulation on tap. A dedicated DT Swiss M1700 wheelset features straight pull spokes and 30mm internal width rims for a predictable, no frills demeanor. A utilitarian choice, they’re sturdy and reasonably light, but won’t blow you away with ultra snappy handling by any means. The wheels are wrapped in a Maxxis Minion DHF/DHRII combo in 2.5″ and 2.4″ widths with EXO+ casings in the “wide trail” option. Personally, I’ve come to prefer the Assegai up front to the Minion DHF, but alas both are quite popular, so it’s not worth splitting hairs over. At this spec level, SRAM’s truly excellent Eagle X01 12-speed drivetrain turns the wheels. Aside from the sturdy DUB Descendant cranks, everything else is X01 level (read: high end). Eagle delivers a massive 500% range and super snappy, predictable shifting for all day romps. We were surprised to see a full coverage e*thirteen chain guide, but remembered that as a Canadian bike brand, it makes a bit more sense. It also helps explain away a couple hundred of the extra grams. Some notable features for keeping things tidy, clockwise from upper left: The Sight features mounts for Wolftooth’s genius B-Rad system under the top tube. On both sides of the frame, rubber grommets are fitted to the cable/hose entrance ports on the frame. The derailleur cable and brake hose follow a nice clean line out of the bottom of the downtube. Lastly, nifty guide tabs are fitted to the shock hardware to prevent cable rub on the frame. Clockwise from top left: although it may be a little difficult to see, a clear vinyl wrap is strategically placed throughout to protect the paint’s lovely finish. On the downtube, a port to secure the cables via zip tie is flanked by both a shuttle guard above and rubber fitting to protect from rock strikes below. Ample tire clearance for up to a 2.6″ tire, no problem. Finally – a molded rubber chainstay protector with the derailleur cable running through the chainstay, out of harm’s way. Geometry First and foremost, I want to commend Norco for being one of the only brands that scales their geometry according to size. While most brands bikes just get longer or shorter in the front end depending on sizes, Norco does the same thing with their back ends. Looking at the rear center figures below, you can see that the chainstays go from 430mm for S to 435mm for M, to 440mm for L to 445mm for XL. Doing this prevents disrupting the balance between the front end and back end, providing a consistent feel throughout the size range. As a rider, this helps you feel “in it” on the bike, regardless of your size. Looking at this through an economic lens, one will quickly realize that it brings about substantially increased tooling costs. In my opinion it’s worth it and I wish more brands would follow their lead. Since that’s out of the way, now we can have a quick look around at the geometry figures. If you’re familiar with what works and where things are headed, it doesn’t take long to realize that the numbers on the Sight are dead on. With my size Large boasting a 77.7º effective seat tube angle, it had me sitting very upright, for a highly efficient climbing position. Speaking of seat angles, Norco even goes so far in keeping a balanced fit through their size range that they steepen that number as the sizes increase. On the other end of the spectrum, a 64º head angle – a number once common on downhill bikes, has the bike braced for the steepest of terrain. A 485mm reach and 440mm chainstays keep the bike nicely balanced and stable without being so long as to impinge on the liveliness. All in all, the numbers are exactly what I’m looking for. Setup Norco has a very well designed setup guide on their website called Ride Aligned. It breaks down suggested settings for each the individual model – in our case the Sight C1. There is even a slider which allows you to toggle your skill level up and down. Doing so affects the suggested suspension and tire settings accordingly and from my experience, accurately, as I found myself quite happy almost exactly where they recommended. On the trail To start, for the bulk of this section of the review, I’ll be focusing on the attributes of the frame itself. As mentioned prior, Norco offers this bike (and others) in carbon or aluminum, 27.5″ or 29″ and with plenty of options for builds. Touching quickly on specs for this bike though, it does consist of a trusty mix of parts, although at just south of $6,700 the value is not bad, not amazing, but – pretty good. SRAM’s Eagle X01 drivetrain was incredible per usual with snappy shifting and huge range. The Code RSC brakes provided excellent stopping power with a consistent feel. The latest Reverb is superior to its predecessors, and having a full 175mm of travel was nice for a long legged rider like myself. The remaining cockpit parts were ho-hum, minus the Deity bar, which was nice, albeit quite stiff. While the DT-Swiss wheels are “name brand” and less generic than some choices, I did find that they felt pretty average on trail. Personally, I’d take an Eagle GX drivetrain and carbon wheels at the same price if that was possible. Anyhow – onto the frame itself… Starting with the climbing, the Sight gave me very little to complain about, albeit being just a hair portly. From a body position standpoint, the super steep seat angle made it easy to effortlessly spin without wasting energy fighting to get up over the front. I can’t overstate it enough, the geometry is spot on. As far as pedaling efficiency is concerned, no major issues there either – on long grinds I used the lockout, but for most intents and purposes, never felt the need. On the ascents, the Sight is a bike you can rally all day for sure. On mellower, mid-grade terrain where you’re using the bike to try and generate speed, the Sight was capable, nimble enough and sure footed, although it wasn’t what I’d consider to be super lively or poppy by any means. As mentioned prior, perhaps some carbon wheels might liven it up a touch, but overall it was a great handling bike. Personally, I think Norco aced it with the geometry, so perhaps the materials and layup leaned more toward taking the edge off, as opposed to lighting a fire underneath you. As far as cornering goes, whether fast or slow, the suspension responded nicely by sitting up in the travel and the frame didn’t give or flex much under load. All in all, it checked the boxes under both cornering and braking nicely. One thing I should touch on are the smart features on the frame – it has excellent protective features from rubber fitment to clear vinyl wrapping in high abrasion areas. The cable and hose routing is brilliantly laid out, although on trail it was a touch on the noisy side – a quick job with some foam pipe insulator could fix that right up though. One thing that didn’t quite hit the mark was the rear suspension. At roughly 2.85:1, the leverage ratio is pretty high. For what it’s worth, 2.5:1 is a nice, ideal ratio. Anyhow, this made it a bit difficult to tune for that “just right” sweet spot in the rear suspension and the shock tended to get a bit overwhelmed during successive mid size hits. While Norco recommends 2 volume reducers, I was bottoming pretty easily on big hits even when I was running less sag than I typically would. When I bumped up to 3 volume reducers, the mid stroke harshness got worse, thus resulting in a greater loss of traction when things got hectic. I eventually settled in the middle on a RockShox 2.5 gnar dog token, where I found a happy medium between compliance and bottom out support. This all makes me think that perhaps this bike would be an excellent candidate for a MegNeg, and I couldn’t help but notice that Norco athletes are running them. With all of that said, most riders will be quite content with the suspension on offer here, but hard chargers might find that it holds them back some, or at the very least is a bit difficult to set up. Overall All in all, the Sight C1 has been a great ride and would likely leave most riders quite happy. With some of the consumer direct brands offering better value and shop brands like Trek or Specialized generally offering a bit less bang for the buck, it lands right in the middle in that department. Again, I absolutely loved the geometry, which is about as good as it gets. Though the Sight lost some points for its finicky rear suspension – although I think it could likely be worked around. At the end of the day, there is a pretty short list of competent long legged 29″ All Mountain bikes – and as it is on that list, the Sight is certainly worth a look. www.norco.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
9 - 28/05/2020 17:17:15

Getting the best mountain bike tyres for the type of riding you do and the conditions you typically encounter can be a real headache. Get it right, however, and tyres can make a big difference to how your bike rides. Mountain bike wheel sizes: 26in, 650b and 29in explained Best mountain bike wheels | Mountain bike wheelsets rated and reviewed Why is it so tough to find the right tyres? First, there’s a lot of assumed knowledge with mountain bike tyres. You’re expected to know what a mud tyre should look like and where it will perform best. You need to know what type of tread pattern works well on smooth or bumpy terrain, and you need a decent knowledge about carcass thickness and rubber compound. But, fear not, we’ve done the leg work for you. For each tyre we’ve added what that model is good at, what it’s designed for, whether it’s available with different rubber compounds or carcass thicknesses, and which discipline it’s most suited to. We’ve also added an in-depth buyer’s guide and glossary at the end of the article, to help you find exactly what you need. Many of the tyres we’ve tested recently, and have been impressed by, have been orientated towards trail and enduro riding, and this is reflected in our current list. We have more tyre reviews in the pipeline, and will only recommend tyres we’ve tested and that are current models. Best mountain bike tyres, as rated by our expert testers Maxxis Minion DHF Wide Trail 3C TR EXO Maxxis Shorty 3C Max Terra EXO Michelin Wild Enduro Front Gum-X / Magi-X Schwalbe Hans Dampf SuperGravity ADDIX Soft Schwalbe Magic Mary SuperGravity ADDIX Soft Vee Tire Co SNAP WCE Top 40 Michelin Wild Enduro Rear Gum-X Specialized Eliminator BLCK DMND Specialized Hillbilly BLCK DMND WTB Verdict 2.5 TCS Tough High Grip Maxxis Minion DHF Wide Trail 3C TR EXO 5.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Maxxis Shorty 3C EXO TR – becoming a classic winter tyre in the UK. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Best for… Downhill, enduro and trail riding depending on width, casing type and compound Hardpack, dust, rocks and roots Front tyre Arguably the benchmark of performance, especially in dry or hardpack conditions, the Minion DHF is a favourite with gravity-fed DH and enduro riders and all-day trail-blazers alike. Its time-proven tread pattern offers predictable grip on a wide range of trail surfaces and the large centre blocks means it rolls well to boot. The Minion DHF’s lack of grip in sloppy and boggy conditions is its only pitfall. Read the full Maxxis Minion DHF Wide Trail 3C TR EXO tyre review Latest deals Maxxis Shorty 3C Max Terra EXO 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Maxxis Shorty 3C EXO TR – becoming a classic winter tyre in the UK. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Best for… Downhill, enduro and trail riding depending on tyre casing, width and compound Soft terrain such as deep, gloopy and wet mud, or dust and loam Front or rear tyre The Shorty is a mud-specific tyre that offers exceptional levels of grip thanks to its tall, aggressive blocks that bite through soft ground. Despite its large blocky tread, the Shorty still grips fairly well once it dries out and we’ve seen downhill and enduro racers use the Shorty in completely dry conditions with deep dust. Read the full Maxxis Shorty 3C Max Terra EXO tyre review Latest deals Michelin Wild Enduro Front Gum-X / Magi-X 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Michelin Wild Enduro tyre offers plenty of traction, especially in sloppy conditions. Dan Milner/MBUK Best for… Downhill and enduro Soft terrain such as deep, gloopy and wet mud, or dust and loam Exceptional grip on rocks, roots and hard surfaces, too Front tyre The Wild Enduro impressed us with its consistent grip thanks to its large blocks that dig into soft ground with ease. Its shoulders – despite looking square – provide predictable traction near their limits thanks to the rubber flexing and not rebounding quickly. All of this grip comes at a cost, though. They roll very slowly and if run at lower pressures the flexy sidewall can squirm when ridden on hardpack sections. Read the full Michelin Wild Enduro Front Gum-X / Magi-X 2.4in tyre review Latest deals Schwalbe Hans Dampf SuperGravity ADDIX Soft 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); It’s brilliant through rocky descents, especially under braking. William Poole Best for… Downhill, enduro and trail riding depending on carcass weight and rubber compound Hardpack, rocks and roots Rear tyre Best-suited to rocky, hardpack terrain, the Hans Dampf has great straight-line grip with impressive rolling speed. It’s also predictable when leaned over for cornering thanks to its bulky side knobs and the ADDIX Soft rubber is well damped It’s not quite as good on soft, boggy terrain, though. Read the full Schwalbe Hans Dampf SuperGravity ADDIX Soft tyre review Latest deals Schwalbe Magic Mary SuperGravity ADDIX Soft 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); There’s plenty of sidewall support from the SuperGravity casing. Andy Lloyd Best for… Downhill, enduro and trail riding All terrain types from mud through to hardpack, rocks and roots Lighter casing and different compounds are available depending on your preferred discipline Front or rear tyre Thankfully, this tyre from Schwalbe really lives up to the ‘magic’ part of its name because it offers exceptional grip in soft conditions while providing plenty of bite in turns and off-cambers. Because it’s such a generalist, it’s as grippy on hardpack, rocky terrain as it is on softer ground thanks to its large blocky tread and soft rubber compound. Impressively, it also rolls well considering its weight and tread compound. Read the full Schwalbe Magic Mary SuperGravity ADDIX Soft tyre review Latest deals Vee Tire Co SNAP WCE Top 40 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Vee Tire Co is becoming more known on the MTB scene. Bike Connection / Roo Fowler Best for… Downhill, enduro and heavy trail riding Hardpack, rocks and roots Front or rear tyre Thanks to sticky rubber and a tread pattern that resembles Maxxis’ Minion DHF, it’s no surprise the SNAP WCE Top 40 tyre is a cracking performer. The sticky rubber means it grips to wet rocks, roots and trails impressively – as long as they aren’t too boggy. While the predictable squish of the side knobs means that when leaned over in turns they’re really predictable. The payoff for this grip is a high level of rolling resistance and the tread pattern isn’t best-suited to gloopy conditions. Read the full Vee Tire Co SNAP WCE Top 40 tyre review Latest deals Michelin Wild Enduro Rear Gum-X 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); It’s on slippery, muddy and loose tracks where this tyre really excels. William Poole Best for… Downhill and enduro All terrain types from mud through to hardpack, rocks and roots Rear tyre With good turning grip, especially when the conditions are loose – thanks to its bulky side knobs – the Wild Enduro also grips well on wet roots and rocks. Because it’s a rear-specific tyre, the sidewall is fairly thick, so it offers resistance against punctures and tears. It’s also got tightly-spaced centre tread blocks to help improve rolling resistance, making it less suited to trail riding. Read the full Michelin Wild Enduro Rear Gum-X tyre review Latest deals Specialized Eliminator BLCK DMND 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Braking grip is good on rocky ground where it stays settled over bumps. Andy Lloyd Best for… Downhill, enduro, and trail in lighter GRID casing Hardpack, rocks and roots Rear tyre The rear-specific Eliminator with BLCK DMND casing is well-suited to aggressive riders and hard surfaces. It has a rounded shape which means it carves turns well and stands up to being pushed hard through corners even at low pressures. It rolls well, even specced with this thick casing, but isn’t great in the mud or when the ground is really loose. Read the full Specialized Eliminator BLCK DMND tyre review Latest deals Specialized Hillbilly BLCK DMND 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The large casing of this 2.6in version seems to offer meaningful floatation over really soft loamy sections. Andy Lloyd Best for… Downhill and enduro Soft terrain such as deep, gloopy and wet mud, or dust and loam Front or rear tyre The Hillbilly’s aggressive tread pattern helps to make it one of the best tyres we’ve ridden in soft conditions, whether that’s wet, gloopy mud or hero dirt such as soft loam. The BLCK DMND casing has thicker sidewalls with less material under the tyre’s tread. This gives it a damped feel on rough ground. It’s doesn’t always offer the best grip on wet rocks, but the grip available is predictable most of the time. The square profile means that low cornering angles can make it give way quickly. Read the full Specialized Hillbilly BLCK DMND 2.6in tyre review Latest deals WTB Verdict 2.5 TCS Tough High Grip 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); On the trail it has a comfortable, well-damped feel over rocky terrain. Immediate Media Best for… Downhill and enduro Soft terrain like deep, gloopy and wet mud or dust and loam Front tyre but can be used on the rear in very wet or soft conditions The Verdict offers fantastic wet-weather grip especially if the trails are sloppy and soft. WTB even makes a Wet version of the Verdict with even bigger knobs, but we never felt like the standard one needed more. Its compound makes it stick to wet rocks and roots, too. It doesn’t roll very fast and isn’t very grippy or predictable on hardpack trails, or when you’re leaning the bike over in turns. Read the full WTB Verdict 2.5 TCS Tough High Grip tyre review Latest deals Mountain bike tyres buyer’s guide Your tyres make a massive difference to the character and ride of your bike. We bring you the lowdown on what to look for when buying new mountain bike tyres. Should I use tubeless tyres? Most bikes come specced with tubeless-ready rims and tyres. Alex Evans Traditional tyres use an inner tube to keep them inflated, but how do ‘tubeless’ tyres work? Tubeless tyres ditch the inner tube in favour of a tyre that’s specifically designed to be airtight, either through the use of an additional layer of rubber or the use of a latex-based sealant. Inner tube buying guide: common sizes, materials, valve types and more Mavic’s UST (Universal System Tubeless) system uses a thick side-walled tyre that locks into a specific sealed-bed UST rim. The advantage is an airtight seal with or without a sealant liquid inside, and very stable, pinch puncture-resistant, low pressure performance. The downsides are that these tyres are more expensive and also heavier. Most mountain bike tyres on the market today use some sort of ‘tubeless compatible’ system. These tyres use a tubeless bead but require sealant in order to make them airtight. They also require rim tape to seal the spoke holes off. The benefit of this system is that it is lighter than a full UST system and offers the user a wide variety of tyre choices. The downside is that there is not an established standard between the various tyre and rim manufacturers, so some rim and tyre combinations work better than others. Even so, this is the most common tubeless option you’ll encounter. What is better, light or heavy mountain bike tyres? The DHF has great turning performance and is suited to most conditions until it gets really muddy and boggy. Andy Lloyd Weight has a big effect on the agility and acceleration of your bike. Light tyres are much easier to spin up to speed, change direction with and even stop, so make sense for cross-country use. Heavier tyres are generally thicker, which means they resist punctures and pinch flats better and are less likely to flop and roll off at low pressures. Heavier tyres also increase the gyroscopic effect of the wheel, making the bike more stable on the ground or in the air. At the really heavy end, reinforced-carcass downhill tyres are designed to be run at low pressures without popping or tearing off the rim, and rely on the help of gravity to get their 1kg-plus weight moving. What width mountain bike tyre should I use? Maxxis Assegai tyres were designed with input from Greg Minnaar. Steve Behr There’s a massive range of tyre widths available from 1.5in to 5in fat bike tyres. The majority of mountain bikers run tyres in the 2.2in to 2.5in range, and more recently up to 2.6in has become commonplace. Tyres in this range offer good protection and grip for more aggressive riding. Narrower tyres offer less cushioning and have less ‘footprint’ to grip with. Pinch flat resistance is lower, too, unless narrower tyres are running higher pressures. They are lighter and roll faster though, and often cut through sticky mud and gloop better. Square-profile tyres have more edging grip but are harder to lurch into corners. Rounder tyres roll more easily into corners and slide more predictably. Edge grip isn’t as aggressive, though. There’s a massive range of tyre widths available, from 1.5in to 5in fat bike tyres. The majority of mountain bikers run tyres in the 2.2in to 2.5in range, and more recently up to 2.6in has become commonplace. Cross-country tyres are likely to be at the narrower end of the scale, while trail/enduro tyres tend to be a little wider. Tyres in this range offer good protection and grip for more aggressive riding. Narrower tyres, on the other hand, offer less cushioning and have less ‘footprint’ to grip with. Pinch flat resistance is lower on narrower tyres, too, unless they are being ran at higher pressures, which in turn could negatively affect grip. Narrower tyres often cut through sticky mud and gloop better, though. Ultimately, the ideal tyre width depends on what you’re riding, where you’re riding and how you’re riding. Weighing up all three aspects will help you find the right tyre. For a more in-depth explainer on the subject, head to our ultimate test on mountain bike tyre size to determine the fastest width for trail and enduro riding. How grippy are mountain bike tyres? Addix Ultra Soft is the enduro and downhill compound found in the Magic Mary and Dirty Dan. Russell Eich / Immediate Media This depends on the profile of the tyre, its durometer rating (how soft the rubber the tyre is made from is) and the overall build of the tyre. A tyre with a square-profile will have more edging grip but is harder to lurch into corners. Rounder tyres roll more easily into corners and slide in loose terrain more predictably. Edge grip isn’t as aggressive, though. It’s a slightly simplistic summary, but a tyre that grips well because of a sticky/softer rubber compound and tall square-edged knobs will have more drag than those that don’t. But within this generalisation there are some notable tyres that reduce drag with a slight sloping of tread patterns, multiple tread compounds or the use of a ‘fast’ carcass. Conversely, some tyres that have barely any tread actually bite as well as some mid-knob rubber. All of this depends on your local terrain as well – a super chunky aggressive tyre won’t be as useful on the slick rock of Moab as a lower profile tyre. Glossary Shoulder: The edge tread that provides off-camber and cornering grip Sidewall: The bare side of the tyre. Double or ‘two ply’ on DH tyres for extra stability and pinch flat resistance; airtight on UST tyres for tubeless running Bead: The steel wire or Kevlar cord at the base of the sidewall that locks into the rim lip to keep the tyre in place. Kevlar or Aramid fibre beads are lighter and let the tyre fold, but are more expensive and the tyre is more likely to fall off if flatted Carcass: The fabric body of the tyre made from overlapping weaves. A more supple carcass enables the tyre to deform around lumps for extra grip but is less stable at low pressures. A reinforced carcass is more protective and less wobbly at low pressures but heavier and less comfortable. Lighter carcasses are more likely to get point punctures too TPI: The number of threads per inch in the carcass. Tyres with more threads are generally higher quality with a more subtle feel, but companies such as Tioga use a smaller quantity of fatter threads Multi-compound: Tyres that use different rubber compounds; dual compounds are normally harder in the centre or underneath for fast rolling and long life, but soft on the shoulders for cornering grip. Schwalbe and Maxxis now do triple-compound tyres too Durometer: The softness rating of the rubber; 70 and above is hard, 60 medium and anything below 50 is soft. The softer the tyre, the stickier it is on rocks and so on, but the faster it will wear out

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Bike Radar
4 - 28/05/2020 13:51:14

Der Beitrag Cannondale Topstone Carbon Neo Lefty 1 2021 first ride review – the E-gravel (mountain) bike erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
14 - 28/05/2020 07:51:13

I’m not really a hydration pack person. If I have the opportunity to don a bottle and a hip pack, or just use my bike’s trendy in-frame storage box, I’ll take it. I generally find packs to be stiflingly hot and bulky. It’s a pain to sync all the adjustments, they cause back pain, and Read More

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Bike Mag
14 - 26/05/2020 16:00:46

The latest Roval wheels are said to be stronger and less likely to cut your tire, all while weighing just 1,240-grams for the set.( Photos: 8 )

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Pinkbike