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Latest Articles

2pts - 3 hours ago

We review Crankbrothers' Candy pedal, a mid-sized, kinda-has-a-platform-but-mostl...

Posted by
Pinkbike
16pts - 25/06/2019 10:17:30

In the “The Lab” we present the latest products and put them through their...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
7pts - 25/06/2019 00:17:33

Smith sent us home from Sea Otter with a fairly n...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
8pts - 24/06/2019 18:51:31

Tioga took its outlandish Spyder Stratum saddle and made it a little less outlandish by pu...

Posted by
Bike Mag
17pts - 24/06/2019 16:17:26

The COMMENCAL META POWER 29 has always been a great choice for those who want to u...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
18pts - 24/06/2019 09:34:29

The R.X750 is ROTWILD’s answer to the growing competition in the eMTB segment. Wit...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
6pts - 23/06/2019 19:02:02

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
12pts - 23/06/2019 19:02:00

Anthony Fantano reviews Kaz Yamamura's custom album art vinyl-wrapped 27.5" Trek ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
13pts - 23/06/2019 19:02:00

Der Beitrag

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
11pts - 23/06/2019 19:01:58

We originally posted a story on this ludicrous...

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Bike Radar

Latest Photos

2 - 3 hours ago

We review Crankbrothers' Candy pedal, a mid-sized, kinda-has-a-platform-but-mostly-doesn't offering that's popular with trail riders.( Photos: 15, Comments: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
16 - 25/06/2019 10:17:30

In the “The Lab” we present the latest products and put them through their paces for you. Some undergo long-term tests, while we check others out only briefly. This time we reveal how the Trickstuff MAXIMA brake fared. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); What should brakes do? The clue’s in the name. They should brake! Ideally, they should be powerful and offer consistent performance while providing great modulation. And if they look great, even better! But Trickstuff’s DIRETTISSIMA brakes already ticked all these boxes! So, in which way are the new MAXIMA better? Following the motto “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, the people at Trickstuff only gave the DIRETTISIMA a few updates. The most important upgrade is in the new lever, which is now longer and designed to allow for a more progressive fluid displacement inside the hose. Talking of hoses, the brake line of the DIRETTISSIMA has been replaced with a Goodridge braided stainless-steel hose, which comes as standard on all MAXIMA brakes — and also looks incredibly good! For all those who refuse to read the instructions: The bleeding port sits on the side, right at the end of the reservoir! Finally a tool-free reach adjustment. And it’s smooth as silk. Dreams are made of aluminium. The Trickstuff MAXIMA is machined from one solid block of aircraft grade 7075 aluminium. Well supported. The small support on the lever allows for optimal power transmission. On the first pulls, we were quite disappointed with the performance of the Trickstuff MAXIMA. Aren’t these meant to be the most powerful brakes on the market? But wait… oh… now, boom! Oh shit! That’s exactly what happened. Compared to other brakes from the competition, the Trickstuff MAXIMA need a lot more time to bed in – only after a long, steep descent did they unleash their full power. However, once the Trickstuff MAXIMA are bedded in properly, they provide an insane amount of power. No matter how fast you’re blazing down the trail, if you jam on the lever, the front wheel locks up without hesitation. As the famous Pirelli advert once said: “power is nothing without control” – and the Trickstuff MAXIMA strike a superb balance in this respect. The Goodridge braided stainless-steel hose looks incredibly good. Speiseteller: Dinner plate. You could use the new aluminium pistons to serve up soup for an entire family. Not just for the MAXIMA. Trickstuff’s Power pads are awesome with other brakes too! With every touch of the lever, you can feel the calliper reacting: you can sense the point when the pad touches the disc, then the menacing scraping sound of the brake biting the disc lets you know the raw force of their mind-boggling braking-power is coming. But is this power consistent? In one word, yes! Where other brakes start burning-up, the MAXIMA just start biting harder. And after four months of constant use we didn’t notice any contact-point fluctuations. Only in wet conditions does the Trickstuff MAXIMA tend to squeak a little, but the noise disappears after a few hard brakes. Are you looking for the perfect brake? Your search is over, here it is! The Trickstuff MAXIMA offers everything you’re looking for in a brake and sets a new, undisputed benchmark in power. Unfortunately, this much performance comes at a price. At € 1,000, they’re no bargain. But then, who doesn’t dream of a brake beautifully machined, with braided stainless-steel hoses that deliver a frightening braking performance? We say, shut up and take my money! TopsWorkmanshipBrake-performanceConsistencyModulationFlopsThe portholes on some frames might be too small for the chunky braided stainless-steel hosesFor most of us, they are just too expensive Tester Valentin Duration 4 Months Price 1.150 € (with rotors and pads) Weight 1.050 g (Set incl. rotors) More Info trickstuff.de This article is from E-MOUNTAINBIKE issue #017E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free! Der Beitrag The Lab: Trickstuff MAXIMA in review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
7 - 25/06/2019 00:17:33

Smith sent us home from Sea Otter with a fairly new set of glasses, dubbed the “Ruckus”, for testing. Based around a fairly large coverage lens, they take advantage of Smith’s genius PivLock system and each pair come with an additional Rose lens, which is fairly light in tint and good at dealing with shadows. As things go from cool, foggy and loamy to hot dry and dusty here in the Santa Cruz area, we’ve had enough time to summarize our thoughts on them. Read on for the full review… Details ChromaPop lenses Hydroleophobic lens coating Extra ChromaPop Contrast Rose lens Hydrophilic megol nose pads for a secure fit Medium fit/large coverage Two-position adjustable nose pads Hydrophilic megol temple & nose pads for a secure fit Auto-lock hinges 7×4 toric lens curvature TR90 frame material PivLock removable arms Padded soft case and bag included Lifetime warranty $189 USD Perhaps the coolest feature on a set of performance glasses to date, FidLock means fast, tool free lens swaps in a matter of seconds. You simply hold your thumb down behind the hinge, then pull the arms off. Putting them back onto the lens is even easier…Slide them on until they click into place. Clockwise from left: The Ruckus come in a nice padded case with a cleaning bag and laser cut foam padding. The arms are straight and low in profile with soft, grippy material on the inside and the underside. The nose piece is adjustable between two different positions vertically, to fit a variety of faces, which is key as the lens is rather large. Lastly, despite being removable with no tools, you can still tighten their actual hinge with a standard eyewear screwdriver. This is the whole kit with the arms removed. The nose fitting pops off with a simple tug and snaps into place rather easily with an audible click. The rose colored option is included with each set of Ruckus glasses. It’s great for riding in the woods, provided there isn’t too much canopy and a lack of light. The “platinum” dark lens is ideal for bright, mid day riding out in the open. It cuts a great deal of glare. It’s worth noting that Smith also offers a photochromic (read: transition) lens option that changes depending on light, although it retails for an extra $20. On the trail Since most of the testing occurred in the Santa Cruz area, we mainly used the rose colored lenses as the woods here are in fact quite dark. In terms of tint, they were just right for the majority of our riding, outside of very early mornings and late evenings where a clear lens would be ideal. With that in mind, we’ll be reaching out to Smith to test out the photochromic transition lens out of curiosity. Optically, the lenses are both razor sharp, offering incredibly good clarity with zero distortion. Since the trails here are either quite loamy, dusty or some combination of both, the expansive coverage of the Ruckus proved to be an excellent alternative to goggles. They offered better protection than the average glasses, but weren’t as cumbersome or annoying as a set of goggles. On our testers rather average sized head there were no quirks in terms of fit – the lenses didn’t butt up against cheek bones, and the top didn’t butt up against his forehead or helmet. It’s always interesting to see how well a set of glasses (particularly their arms) play(s) with a helmet, and while there’s no doubt that the Ruckus would work quite nicely with a Smith helmet, they also worked admirably with the Bell Sixer and Troy Lee Designs A2 that they were mainly paired with. The actually arms seemed best tucked under the retention system, not below it. Their soft material and low profile nature made them an afterthought on the trail. The Ruckus managed fog fairly well – at least on par with anything else, which is impressive given how much more they cover your face, leaving less room for air flow (and less room for dirt to squeak through and spackle your eyes). Although in stock form the glasses worked well, a bit of Cat Crap is the best thing you can do to prevent fogging. As you’ll see at the link, it’s not actual cat crap, but rather a genius anti-fog that skiers have using for ages. Overall At the end of the day, the Ruckus are truly excellent glasses – it’s hard to find a single flaw in them. Like anything, you may want to try them on first to ensure they work with your facial profile. That said, if you’re looking for set of glasses that give you near goggle level protection without the hassle and complication that comes along with combining goggles and half lids, you’d be foolish to not give these a look. They are a touch on the pricey side, but the fact that they come with a second lens to help cover a broader range of light conditions helps. That it’s stunningly easy to switch out lenses is the cherry on top. www.smithoptics.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
8 - 24/06/2019 18:51:31

Tioga took its outlandish Spyder Stratum saddle and made it a little less outlandish by putting a cover on it. It still doesn't feel normal, but it feels really, really good. The post Tested: Tioga Undercover Stratum Saddle appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
17 - 24/06/2019 16:17:26

The COMMENCAL META POWER 29 has always been a great choice for those who want to use their eMTB to tackle steep climbs and demanding descents. So when we heard about their new bike, we asked ourselves: “Can COMMENCAL build on a winning formula with their new META POWER 29?” We flew to Andorra to find out… Since its introduction in 2018, the COMMENCAL META POWER 29 has been highly praised for its climbing prowess and monster-trucking descending ability alike, and its smaller wheeled sibling, the META POWER 27, won the “Best Value” prize in our affordable eMTB group test earlier this year. It’s safe to say we had high expectations for this new bike. COMMENCAL META POWER 29 | Shimano E8000/504 Wh | 160/150 mm (f/r) | 29” | Price € 5,799 googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); What’s new with the META POWER 29? In short, there is not much that isn’t new with the COMMENCAL META POWER 29. While the most visually obvious change is the sleek integration of the new, streamlined 504 Wh Shimano BT-E8035 battery, the new META POWER 29 also features an entirely new frame and re-designed geometry. The shape of Shimano’s new battery has allowed COMMENCAL to locate it low in the downtube, which should improve the META POWER 29’s balance, handling and dynamic ride feel. The battery is easily removable with just a quarter turn of a 4 mm Allen key, and COMMENCAL have chosen to forego a battery lock for the sake of simplicity and ease of use. The battery is neatly integrated and easily removable – there is a lot to like here The new Shimano on/off button is easy to operate, even with thick gloves and cold fingers The new COMMENCAL META POWER 29 is driven by Shimano’s reliable E8000 motor While the downtube of the new COMMENCAL META POWER 29 frame has been redesigned around the integrated Shimano battery, the changes don’t end there. COMMENCAL told us that the entire alloy chassis has been reworked to increase stiffness and durability. A new rear triangle was created to boost stiffness and strength, and the beefed-up linkage now runs on Enduro Bearings, which should increase service intervals. The new frame also enjoys a bump up in travel to 150 mm – a 10 mm increase over previous models – which is paired with a 160 mm travel fork up front. The whole rear triangle has been redesigned with the aim of increasing stiffness The new linkage is beefed-up and runs on high-quality Enduro Bearings for increased durability The motor bash plate is made of tough nylon which proved its strength when taking bad lines over rocky ledges Other improvements include the relocation of the charging port onto the left side of the seat tube and the on/off button onto the left side of the downtube for better access. COMMENCAL have specifically designed rubber seals for the charging port and power switch to prevent water ingress. The frame’s cable routing has also been re-worked, as has the speed sensor, which is now integrated into the dropout and paired with a brake-rotor mounted magnet. Frame protection has also been taken into consideration, with a large yet effective chainstay protector and a moto-trials inspired bash plate to protect the motor. The COMMENCAL R&D department enjoy riding trials motorbikes and took inspiration from their petrol powered toys whilst designing the bash plate for the new META POWER 29 It is clear to see that a lot of thought went into improving the new META POWER 29 frame The build kit of the new META POWER 29 One big benefit of buying from a direct-to-consumer brand like COMMENCAL is the value for money they can offer. The new META POWER 29 makes the most of this with a well thought out build kit and some drool-worthy parts. The suspension is taken care of by RockShox and their Super Deluxe Ultimate shock and Lyrik Ultimate fork. Brakes and transmission are covered by SRAM, in the form of their powerful CODE RSC brakes with 200 mm rotors front and back and an X01 Eagle derailleur matched with a GX Eagle shifter and ebike friendly NX Eagle 12-speed cassette. The new META POWER 29 rolls on grippy Schwalbe Magic Mary tires in their Addix Soft compound and Super Gravity casing which are fitted to DT Swiss H 1700 SPLINE wheels – an excellent combination, especially at this price point. The small Shimano E7000 remote and underbar mounted dropper lever keeps the cockpit nice and tidy Fork RockShox Lyrik Ultimate 160 mm Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate 150 mm Motor/battery Shimano E8000 504 Wh Drivetrain SRAM XO1/GX/NX Eagle 12-speed Brakes SRAM CODE RSC 200/200 mm Seatpost KS LEV INTEGRA Stem RIDE ALPHA 50 mm Handlebars RIDE ALPHA 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss H 1700 SPLINE Tires Schwalbe Magic Mary 2.35” Price € 5,799 Grippy tires and big rotors… …the spec of the new META POWER 29 leaves little to be desired The META POWER 29 will be available from the end of August in the “Race” build we tested. However, you can expect two more model options (a flagship build and a more affordable version) to drop later in the year. The geometry of the new META POWER 29 COMMENCAL have completely reworked the META POWER 29’s geometry for 2020. The bike has been given the “longer, lower and slacker” treatment, to good effect as we found out whilst riding. The head angle is now a degree slacker than previously, sitting at 65°. The seat tube angle has been steepened by two degrees to an upright 77°, and the reach has been stretched out to 475 mm in size Large. The wheelbase has grown and the BB has dropped slightly to -20 mm. Size S M L XL Seat tube 415 mm 440 mm 465 mm 495 mm Top tube 573 mm 595 mm 622 mm 648 mm Head tube 120 mm 125 mm 130 mm 135 mm Head angle 65° 65° 65° 65° Seat angle 77° 77° 77° 77° Chainstay 453 mm 453 mm 453 mm 453 mm BB Drop 20 mm 20 mm 20 mm 20 mm Wheelbase 1,223 mm 1,245 mm 1,273 mm 1,300 mm Reach 430 mm 450 mm 475 mm 500 mm First Ride Review of the new COMMENCAL META POWER 29 After just the first few meters of trail, we felt right at home on the new COMMENCAL META POWER 29. The geometry puts you in a very comfortable and balanced position right from the get-go, and the bike stays confident and controllable no matter how demanding the trails become. On the way up, the steep 77° seat angle keeps the rider central and upright on the bike and makes climbing a very comfortable affair. Neither long fire road slogs nor steep and technical sections can defeat the new META POWER 29 – it just keeps rolling. Its relatively long chainstays keep the front end under control on the steeps and its 29” wheels and grippy tires mean you can fly up the hills and focus on what the COMMENCAL enjoys the most: descending. The META POWER 29 is a comfortable climber and easily takes steep ascents in its stride However, where the new COMMENCAL really comes alive is on demanding descents Point the META POWER 29 downhill, and it really comes into its own. Its generous reach measurement and relaxed 65° head angle paired with a balanced ride feel mean you stay in control no matter how steep the trail becomes, and the redesigned rear end gives loads of traction. The bike feels stiff and direct and holds its line well, however, it is still agile and lively enough to pop off roots and rocks and it flicks around corners despite its lengthy chainstays. We never felt like we got to the limits of the bike – no matter how hard we pushed, the META POWER 29 still had reserves to give. One thing that is especially noticeable out on the trail is the lack of noise. The only sounds we heard were the noise of the suspension doing its job and the tires hooking up with the ground. Occasionally there was some cable rattling from the cockpit, but that can easily be taken care of with some zip ties or heat-shrink. The battery stayed very quiet in its casing, and the frame was free of rattling during the two big days of riding. Of course, this may change over time but first impressions were very good. We never felt like we got to the limits of the bike – no matter how hard we pushed, the META POWER 29 still had reserves to give Even in rough terrain the META POWER 29 stays composed and confident Steeper than it looks – we tested the new COMMENCAL on some of the steepest trails around googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Helmet Bell Sixer MIPS Fasthouse | Jersey Fasthouse Fastline Slash SS | Shorts Fasthouse Crossline | Kneepads Fox Enduro Pro | Gloves Fasthouse Speed Style | Socks Stance OG The build kit fitted to the new COMMENCAL META POWER 29 performs convincingly. The excellent RockShox suspension works well and eats up any bumps it comes across, while the powerful SRAM Code RSC brakes provide plenty stopping power and modulation on the steeps. Our only gripe is the shift cable routing on the drive side of the bike, where the cable passes over the lower link. Here the cable sits directly on the paint job, and we would recommend using some heat-shrink or rubber mastic tape to cover this small (15 mm) contact point in order to avoid any damage through rubbing. On the non-drive side, however, COMMENCAL employ a neat cable guide to overcome this issue. Our only gripe after two days of riding was this small section of cable routing. We would recommend using some rubber tape or heat-shrink to protect the paintwork here. Conclusion With the new META POWER 29, COMMENCAL prove that it is possible to improve a winning formula. The new frame, geometry and integrated battery are the ingredients needed to create a worthy successor to the original model. The spec is on point, and the majority of the frame details are very well thought out too. In short, the new COMMENCAL META POWER 29 is a great choice for anyone looking for a hard-charging eMTB that will not hold them back. We can’t wait to test it against its toughest competitors soon! For more information head to commencal-store.co.uk TopsNeatly integrated and removable battery Confidence inspiring geometry and ride character Great spec and well-designed bash guard FlopsThe gear cable routing could be improved at the lower link Der Beitrag First Ride Review: COMMENCAL META POWER 29 – Improving a winning formula erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
18 - 24/06/2019 09:34:29

The R.X750 is ROTWILD’s answer to the growing competition in the eMTB segment. With a massive 750 Wh battery and superb handling qualities, it’s designed to tackle the remotest backcountry and conquer the highest peaks – and we’ve already tested one for you on our Alpine home trails. With 150 mm of travel front and rear, the new ROTWILD R.X750 will be available in three versions from September 2019. Prices range from € 6,499 to € 9,999. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The concept behind the ROTWILD R.X750 If you want to truly understand the ROTWILD R.X750, you’ll have to meet its creator first. Lutz Scheffer isn’t just a bike designer, he’s also an enthusiastic eMTBer. During a radical self-experiment he exposed himself in his adopted home of Garmisch-Partenkirchen three years ago, Scheffer piled up over a quarter of a million vertical meters (in just one year!), riding an electric mountain bike almost exclusively on Alpine terrain. Together with his team, he developed the ROTWILD R.X750 especially for this kind of very demanding terrain. High on the list of priorities were a large rechargeable battery, a suitable motor, a harmonious geometry and, above all, an adequate suspension system. But the engineering team also put a lot of thought into small details and the overall design of the bike. The ROTWILD R.X750 was developed specifically for Alpine terrain. Integration as a priority At the heart of the ROTWILD R.X750 is a full carbon frame, which was designed with an eye toward integration. As a result, the frame can accommodate both a fully-integrated, yet removable 750 Wh battery, and an Eightpins dropper post. The latter utilizes the actual seat tube as the lower-post, a clever solution that allows for neat integration and a huge adjustment range of up to 228 mm (size xl). A true highlight: the Eightpins dropper-post offers up to 228 mm of travel (size XL). The futuristic-looking stem comes with an integrated smartphone-holder ex-works. When you’re not using this, however, you can cover it with a small rubber plug. The cover of the charging socket can be attached to the motor-housing with a magnet. In addition, ROTWILD developed its own stem, which perfectly matches the boisterous look of the frame. Small details such as the magnet used to hold the cover of the charging socket in place during charging, reveal loving attention to detail. To round off the harmonious picture, ROTWILD runs the display cable through the handlebars and attaches the spoke magnet directly on the brake rotor. Thanks to the MonkeyLink-mount you can attach a light quickly and easily. And of course, all cables are internally routed. The display cable runs inside the handlebars. With such a high level of integration, however, we’d expect a more modern display-solution than the outdated BLOKS model. The ROTWILD R.X750 – designed to perform A flashback to 2014. At the Bike-Festival in Riva del Garda, ROTWILD introduces the first eMTB prototype with a Brose motor. To this day ROTWILD sticks with the German motor-manufacturer and equips its new R.X750 with Brose’s latest drive, the Drive S Mag. This delivers tons of power, is incredibly easy to modulate and also provides the most natural ride-feeling. A 750-Wh- battery equipped with the latest type 21700 cells provides the power. The powerful 750 Wh battery hides inside the slim downtube and can be removed downwards. The battery of the ROTWILD comes with quick release-system a standard, which can be replaced with a conventional aftermarket lock if needed. The battery relies on the newest 21700- cell type-technology which allows for compact battery dimensions. But power is useless without traction, especially when riding on demanding terrain and steep climbs. And that’s why ROTWILD deliberately changed the rear-end kinematics of the R.X750 to reduce pedal kickback, which is usually engineered into the suspension of non-motorized bikes to improve pedalling efficiency and prevent the rear-end from bobbing. Whilst the constant supply of power from the motor helps reduce bobbing in the rear-end, spinning and specifically slipping wheels are a major concern in terms of energy management – says Lutz Scheffer. The hidden pivot of the ROTWILD R.X750 is concealed into the frame. Visible in this drawing: The teeth of the pivot-axle mesh together and create a very stiff connection. With the purpose of increasing traction, ROTWILD uses a 27.5″ wheel at the back and combines it with a 2.6″ tire. To make room for the tire and keep the rear-end as short as possible, the engineers developed a clever pivot-axle which doesn’t require any additional bracing. By meshing from both sides, the teeth in the axle allow for a self-centering, torsion-free pivot. At the front, a 29″ wheel is meant to provide better roll-over characteristics and a more precise handling. The ROTWILD R.X750 combines the good rollover characteristics of 29″ wheels (front) with the superb traction of a 27.5″ wheels (rear). The geometry of the ROTWILD R.X750 The ROTWILD R.X750 is available in four frame sizes, S to XL. One striking feature common to all bikes is the huge adjustment range of the dropper post, which provides great freedom of movement. At first glance, the reach, head angle and chainstay-length harmonise well together – something you would expect with a bike in this class. Suspension travel is 150 mm front and rear. Below, all relevant data at a glance. Size S M L XL Seat tube 413 mm 444 mm 473 mm 509 mm Top tube 588 mm 617 mm 654 mm 688 mm Head tube 110 mm 110 mm 130 mm 140 mm Head angle 66° 66° 66° 66° Seat angle 74° 74° 74° 74° Chainstays 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm BB Hight 350 mm 350 mm 350 mm 350 mm Wheelbase 1,172 mm 1,198 mm 1,236 mm 1,270 mm Reach 405 mm 437 mm 468 mm 500 mm Stack 610 mm 617 mm 637 mm 648 mm Specs and availability The ROTWILD R.X750 will be available in three versions from September 2019. With prices starting at € 6,499, all models share the same carbon frame, Brose Drive S Mag motor and 750 Wh battery. Only with the cheaper Core model, ROTWILD replaces the fancy Eightpins dropper with a more humble Crankbrothers Highline model. Whilst all bikes rely on a FOX suspension system, only the high-end spec features Fox’s Factory top-of-the-range model. All versions boast a Shimano groupset… …and four-pot Shimano brakes, from Deore (Core) all the way up to XTR (Ultra). All spec-options include an E13 crankset with 34 t direct mount chainring. Depending on frame size, the crank length is either 160 mm (S), 165 mm (M/L) or 170 mm (XL). The different models in overview R.X750 Ultra Fork FOX 36 FIT4 LSC Factory E-Bike+150 mm Shock FOX FLOAT DPX EVOL Factory150 mm Motor/Battery Brose Drive S MAG 750 Wh Drivetrain Shimano XTR Brakes Shimano XTR Sattelstütze 8Pins Pin Lock 228 mm Vorbau S35 Al6061 Handlebar B35 AL7075 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss HXC 1200 Spline Carbon Tires Continental Baron Projekt Protection 2.4″ / 2.60″ Price € 9,999 R.X750 Pro Fork FOX 36 GRIP Performance E-Bike+150 mm Shock FOX FLOAT DPX EVOL Performance 150 mm Motor/Battery Brose Drive S MAG 750 Wh Drivetrain Shimano XT Brakes Shimano XT Sattelstütze 8Pins 228 mm Vorbau S35 Al6061 Handlebar B35 AL7075 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss HX 1501 Spline One Tires Continental Baron Projekt Protection 2.4″ / 2.60″ Price € 7,999 R.X750 Core Fork FOX 36 GRIP Performance Rhythm E-Bike150 mm Shock FOX FLOAT DPX EVOL Performance 150 mm Motor/Battery Brose Drive S MAG 750 Wh Drivetrain Shimano XT Brakes Shimano 520 Sattelstütze Crankbrothers Highline 150 mm Vorbau S35 Al6061 Handlebar B35 AL7075 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss HX 1900 Spline Tires Continental Baron Projekt Protection 2.4″ / 2.60″ Price € 6,499 The ROTWILD R.X750 on the trail We had the opportunity to test the ROTWILD R.X750 on our Alpine home-trails around the Kampenwand in Aschau but, unfortunately, just for a few runs. With a body height of 1.80 and a medium-sized bike, the riding position is rather compact but still very comfortable. Despite the long dropper extension, you never feel like you’re sitting far back over the rear wheel, not even on steep climbs. This narrow singletrail climb is a lot steeper in reality than in this picture – and yet, with the ROTWILD R.X750 it was a piece of cake! googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); One striking feature of the R.X750 is the fully active rear-suspension which, on technical climbs especially, filters out even smaller bumps sensitively, without digging too deep into the travel and always generating tons of traction. If you ride seated, you won’t have to deal with annoying bobbing and only when sprinting out of the saddle will you notice the rear-end bouncing a little. That being said, no one really sprints out of the saddle on an eMTB. The Brose Drive S Mag inspires with its natural ride-feeling and pushes powerfully when riding in the highest support level – we recommend keeping your finger on the brakes though! At the same time, in the highest mode, the motor delivers lots of power even at low cadence – which is extremely practical on techy climbs. And yet, we would have preferred a more progressive, Bosh-like eMTB mode. The active suspension system provides tons of traction on climbs – one of the greatest strengths of the ROTWILD R.X750. Once you drop the seat, you’ll feel nicely centred and firmly integrated between the wheels. Despite the deep front-end, the R.X750 doesn’t feel as front-heavy heavy as previous ROTWILD models. Instead, the riding position is pleasantly balanced and, in combination with the low slung top tube, the ROTWILD provides plenty of freedom of movement and inspires tons of confidence. On narrow, technical trails the bike is enjoyably nimble and implements each direction change directly and willingly. Despite its lively character, the R.X750 always feels composed, even on fast-paced trial sections – a very positive first impression! Once you turn its nose downhill, the R.X750 feels nicely centred and rolls over obstacles effortlessly. UOur first impressions about the new ROTWILD R.X750 Unfortunately, it’s too soon for us to give a final verdict on the new ROTWILD R.X750 as we didn’t have enough time to test it properly. And yet, we can tell you that ROTWILD did a very good job. Good integration, top frame quality and well thought-out details. The suspension system is impressive both up- and downhill and the huge battery capacity should guarantee for long days of trail fun. Although the bike was mainly designed for Alpine terrain, its agile handling makes it a fun option for even more conservative trails. If you’re looking for a high-end eMTB bike, the ROTWILD R.X750 might be what you’re looking for. For more info head to: rotwild.de Even though this was just a brief test, the new ROTWILD R.X750 passed with distinction. Der Beitrag First Test Rotwild R.X750 – brand-new mountain goat from Germany erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
6 - 23/06/2019 19:02:02

Abbey Bike Tools There are two kinds of people who are interested in Abbey Bike Tools. The first is the guy who makes a living working on bicycles and holds a high-enough standard in his craft to only want the highest-quality and most prestigious tools on the market. The second is the passionate bicycle enthusiast who only wants the best for everything he does. We aren’t talking about the one-upper guy here. We are talking about the guy who says, “If I am going to do it, I am going to do it right!” There is a comfort of going into a garage and seeing a huge Snap-On toolbox owned by the greasyhand (and hair) mechanic who is going to work on your car. Abbey Bike Tools could be the bicycle tool equivalent of Snap-On. But the fact is, Snap-On isn’t making hand-made, CNC-machined and individually welded pieces of art. That is what puts Abbey in a class by themselves. Abbey Bike Tools was unintentionally created when Jason Quade, a USA ProTour mechanic was asked by Jeff Crombie to create a custom cassette tool for him. And as simple as that, the Crombie tool became the unnamed brand’s anchor. Although created in the road bike market, nearly every component since the inception of mountain biking has crossed directly over from the road world. That being said, mountain bikes require 10 times more maintenance and repairs than road bikes, making Abbey Bike Tools even more desirable for the dirty discipline of cycling. Abbey Bike Tools are 100 percent American-made in Bend, Oregon. The staff is small, comprised of three people, including Jason and a dog who actually dictates the schedule. Parts are machined and anodized off-site, but the crew at Abbey pride themselves on their American-made branding. The Wash Buddy: The Wash Buddy clamps on your rear dropout and allows you to spin the crank and shift gears while it holds the chain accurately in place. With the rear wheel of the bike, you can do proper drivetrain maintenance and wash your bike pro status. The quick release is aluminum, the spindle is stainless steel and the pulley is made from Delrin. Every part is extremely solvent resistant. The pulleys are also available individually for thru-axle bikes and simply slide over the factory rear axle. MSRP is $55 for the Wash Buddy and $15 for the stand-alone thru-axle pulley. Four-way multi-tool: The ergonomics and precision of the Abbey Bike Tools fourway precision multi-tool is unmatched, and the Emerald Green is unmistakable. Even though it is a simple utility tool, Abbey prides themselves on the tight tolerances they manufacture all their tools with. The multi-tool has an aluminum handle with four stainless steel bits that come in five different stock configurations using hex, slotted, Phillips or Torx bits. They are also available to order in your own custom configuration. With proper use, the bits will not round out or strip out your fasteners and they’ll never rust. There is a good chance you’ll want more than one of these multitools in your possession. The original Crombie tool. BBQ pedal wrench: Besides a multitool, the next most common tool would be a pedal wrench. Abbey takes this simple utility tool to the next level. Machined from tool steel, the 15mm open end is surrounded by a white oak handle. On the opposite side you’ll find 6mm and 8mm hex bits on a swivel that are made from hardened stainless steel, the same material as the original Crombie tool that put Abbey on the proverbial map. It is handy with all of today’s pedal options to reach for one tool that will install or remove any pedal thrown your way. Hits High-quality materials Precise tolerances Longevity Misses Handmade tools are expensive Star Rating www.abbeybiketools.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Product Review: Abbey Bike Tools appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
12 - 23/06/2019 19:02:00

Anthony Fantano reviews Kaz Yamamura's custom album art vinyl-wrapped 27.5" Trek Session 9.9.( Comments: 22 )

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Pinkbike