Channels/E-Bike

This channel is dedicated to everything E-Bike. Here you will find all the latest stories related to E-Bikes, from bike and gear reviews. To How-To videos, ride reports and action from races.

Latest Articles

6pts - 02/07/2021 17:17:10

Justin Barcia's recovery rides are plenty fast.( Photos: 3, Comments: 7 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
4pts - 30/06/2021 13:17:13

New here? Pleased to make your acquaintance! This issue is our way of welcoming ev...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts - 30/06/2021 08:17:15

Nukeproof has launched the Megawatt, an electr...

Posted by
Bike Radar
6pts - 30/06/2021 08:17:14

After sitting it out for a long time, Nukeproof now join the ebike game. They put ...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts - 28/06/2021 20:17:14

It looks like a motorized Mega is on the way.( Photos: 2, Comments: 13 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 27/06/2021 10:00:37

Thomas Escudier rips his Orbea eMTB on flat out trails in France.( Photos: ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 25/06/2021 13:00:38

Pole has just released details of its first

Posted by
Bike Radar
4pts - 25/06/2021 13:00:35

Pole releases its first eMTB and unveils its new Sensei suspension linkage....

Posted by
Pinkbike
10pts - 25/06/2021 12:51:15

Finnish bike manufacturer Pole opens a new chapter in the company’s history ...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts - 25/06/2021 12:51:13

Pole has just released details of its first

Posted by
Bike Radar

Latest Photos

6 - 02/07/2021 17:17:10

Justin Barcia's recovery rides are plenty fast.( Photos: 3, Comments: 7 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
4 - 30/06/2021 13:17:13

New here? Pleased to make your acquaintance! This issue is our way of welcoming everyone who’s new to the scene! Great that you’re here! Simultaneously, it’s a wake-up call to the industry to satisfy real requirements with its solutions and for us to listen to you to identify what’s really needed for the future. Every day, we receive numerous messages from readers who want to know what kind of ebike they should buy for themselves. Often, they are beginners or converts who feel overwhelmed by the myriad genres, choices and models for trekking, touring and trails. We’re convinced that we all benefit from all the new riders on our trails. Every single article in issue #025 of E-MOUNTAINBIKE delivers in its own unique way and generates a lot of potential for discussion. And that’s a good thing, because we’re not here to convince you about what’s right or wrong. Between performance eMTBs and ebikes for leisure, bulky suspension forks and luggage racks, minimalism and modern features, we want to progress the bike scene together with you. And make sure that the right bikes are developed for the right type of rider and the right application. The highlights of this issue The best eMTB of 2021 for € 5,500 – 7 models tested Personal buyer’s guide – This is how you’ll find the right bike for you The end of an era – Are eMTBs the better E-trekking bikes? Already have an eMTB? – Here’s what’s next: eMTB guide for beginners and experts 10 years of Haibike ePerformance – About visions, pioneering spirit and responsibility You can download the new issue now in our magazine app, as usual, completely free! If you don’t have our app yet, you can download it for free in the App Store (iPhone/iPad) or Play Store (Android smartphones and tablets). All the bikes in this issue BiXS LANE EX | Canyon Spectral:ON CF 7 | FEDDZ PFC1 | FOCUS JAM² 6.9 NINE | GASGAS Enduro Cross 11.0 | Haibike AllMtn 4 | Haibike AllMtn SE | HoheAcht Sento Lumo | INFRONT IF-2.1 Fully | MERIDA eONE-FORTY EQ | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 700 | Propain Ekano AL 29 | Riese & Müller Homage | SCOTT Ransom eRIDE 920 | Trek Powerfly FS 9 Equipped Are you ready to shape the bike scene together and make E-MOUNTAINBIKE(ing) even better! We want to shape a future with you, our readers, where we can ride even better, more freely and simply more. Find out how you can help us here. Below we’ve put together a small selection of articles that you’ll find in this issue: After finding the best eMTB of 2021 in our mega group test of 25 top-end models, we tested 7 of the hottest bikes for € 5,500, to find the best budget eMTB. How much performance do you get in this price bracket? And what compromises do you have to accept? What are the best ebikes for touring, travelling and everyday use? Your local bike shop will often recommend a trekking bike, but does that make sense? We took a closer look at the concept of E-trekking bikes and contemporary alternatives, and tell you which is the best choice for commuters, touring and leisure riders. Have an eMTB already? Great! Welcome to our easygoing and occasionally wild bike party! We’ll open the door, hand you a drink and show you what’s what. Then the party can really get started – and a whole life long of fun. Let’s kick it off! Mind over matter – Is software taking over hardware on ebikes? In 1964, Pablo Picasso said, “Computers are completely useless. They can only give us answers.” We know now that he was wrong, but what does the future of software and digitalisation for eMTBs look like? We wanted to find out from two pioneers in the business: Mate Rimac, CEO of Greyp Bikes, and Krešimir „Krešo“ Hlede, COO of Greyp. Haibike are one of the early pioneers of the eMTB world and have transformed from just another bike brand to one of the most recognisable names in the ebike sector. To celebrate their anniversary, we visited Haibike and spoke about the past, present and future. Work-ride balance – Tips for the home office and a better bike life Jacket on top, joggers on the bottom: welcome to the home office! What was a relative exception just a few years ago, is now becoming the rule for more and more people. But are you making the most of the opportunities in your home office? We tell you how you can get all your work done and still find the right work-ride balance. If you have already installed our free app, simply open it and download the latest issue right now. If not, first download the free app from the App Store (iPhone / iPad) or the Play Store (Android smartphones & tablets) and then download the latest issue in the app. All you’ve got to do then is sit back and enjoy (ideally with a cold beer or a delicious cup of coffee)! #qualitytime Der Beitrag OUT NOW! E-MOUNTAINBIKE issue #025 – Welcome… to the new world of eMTBing! erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
2 - 30/06/2021 08:17:15

Nukeproof has launched the Megawatt, an electrified version of its EWS winning Nukeproof Mega enduro bike. The Megawatt has a mixed wheelsize Mullet setup, sports 170mm of travel at the front and back, is powered by Shimano’s EP8 motor and has an aluminium construction. Three models will be offered in five sizes, with prices starting at a penny under £5,000, full details of the build specs are listed below. The Megawatt borrows its DNA directly from the Mega. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Nukeproof says the bike is good for all-mountain, enduro and DH type riding. A mega lineage The original Mega was launched in 2009 and named after the famous Megavalanche race in France – which sees thousands of riders piling down a glacier high in the Alps before tackling some brutally technical singletrack as the race emerges in Alp d’Huez’s village in the valley below after often 40 minutes of intense racing. Over the years, the Mega has amassed plenty of race successes, most notably under Sam Hill, who’s won three EWS seasons onboard various iterations of the bike. Our technical editor-in-chief, Rob Weaver, has a Megawatt and is currently giving it a proper thrashing. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media With electric mountain bikes growing in popularity over the past five years, Nukeproof was one of the notably few brands not offering an e-MTB, until now. True to form, Nukeproof wanted to keep its e-powered Megawatt (see what they did there?) in line with its heritage, and so the form of the bike had to be as close as possible to that of the aluminium, non-assisted Mega – and the non-powered version and Megawatt were designed together. Nukeproof Megawatt’s frame design In terms of aesthetics, this meant that the frame had to be “clean, simple and functional” with fairly square profile tubes and parallel seatstays and top tubes. Likewise, the head tube and down tube junction had to be recognisably Nukeproof, as did the shock’s swinglink that wraps around the seat tube. The shock’s linkage envelops the seat tube, as it does on the regular Mega. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Elements of the V2 Mega can be seen in the rear triangle, though shapes have been modernised via softening some lines and accentuating others, according to Nukeproof. Other tubes run straight, with minimal curves and bumps, while the ratios of tube lengths and diameters have been considered to make sure the bike works aesthetically and functionally. Motor and battery integration Shimano’s EP8 is bolted into the belly of the Megawatt, with the battery concealed in the down tube – either the 504Wh or 630Wh will be fitted, depending on the build spec of the bike. It is accessed via a door in the base of the tube. The Shimano EP8 motor has a custom power tune for the Megawatt. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Battery level, power mode and speed are shown on the Shimano display. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media On or off – select here. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media The Shimano charge port is neatly located above the bottom bracket. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media The battery is held in a one-piece cast motor housing, while the down tube’s shape is designed to give the strength and stiffness needed, whilst also allowing for that battery accessibility. Nukeproof has tuned the power curves of the motor, giving riders two power profiles to chose from: Power and Range. In the Power profile, the Assist Character, Max Torque and Assist Start settings are all one or two stages higher than those in the Range profile. This should give it a more aggressive feel under the pedals in all three power modes (Eco, Trail, Boost). As you’d expect, in Range, the bike should feel a little more muted, but battery range is extended. Nukeproof Megawatt geometry Five sizes of the Megawatt will be offered, from Small to XXL, so virtually all riders should be able to squeeze onto a bike, especially with its smaller 27.5in rear wheel meaning less squeaky bum time on the steeps for shorter-legged riders. Nukeproof says there should be a bike to suit riders from 5ft 2in/159cm all the way to 6ft 7in/201cm. A stubby stem hides the cables, which enter into the top of the headset for a sleek looking front end. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Nukeproof is one of a number of brands that seriously consider the height of the saddle for each bike size, and adjust the geometry to make sure that taller riders don’t have their weight too far back. This can be a problem for taller riders because when you raise the saddle, the effective seat angle decreases. Nukeproof calls this the saddle offset, and it impacts on the real seat tube angle. Vitus’s Escarpe and Sommet, as well as e-Sommet, use this approach too. The Megawatt’s geometry is, as you’d expect, very up to date, with a long, low and slack front end. The rear triangle doesn’t alter in its sizing between frame sizes, and wheelbases are designed to be very similar to that of the 29er Mega. The key geometry figures for a Large are: Reach: 475mm Head angle: 64 degrees Seat angle: 78 degrees Saddle offset (XS/L/XXL): 139.98mm / 163.32mm / 194.35mm Chainstay length: 442mm Wheelbase: 1,288mm Bottom bracket height: 345mm Nukeproof Megawatt suspension details The 170mm of rear wheel travel is provided by a four-bar Horst linkage, with a swinglink driving the shock into the top tube. The initial axle path is rearward, up until around the sag point, which should help smooth the ride and reduce the amount the wheel hooks up on square edges. 38mm stanchion forks feature throughout the range. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Nukeproof has aimed for a suspension that’s supple at the start, to boost grip and comfort, before offering mid-stroke support. At the end of the travel the kinematic’s progressiveness backs off, allowing greater rider adjustment with the air shock’s volume spacers. The projected sag range is 30 to 35 per centre, so riders have a reasonably wide range of tuneability to suit their preferences. The leverage rate on the shock is said to be very similar to that of the Mega, with a 22 per cent progression through the stroke and an average ratio of 2.6. In terms of anti-squat, in the lower gears it’s higher but still sits lower than a non-powered Mega because the motor should make up for that loss of pedal efficiency. This is done to increase suppleness and grip when climbing. In higher gears, the anti-squat is fairly low, to reduce the impact of bumps on the cranks – basically reducing pedal kickback – for a smoother ride. Likewise, when it comes to anti-rise, there’s some squat under normal braking loads when the suspension is around the mid-travel point, to help the rear tyre dig in, but this tails off on the biggest hits, allowing the rear end to work as it should in all conditions. Nukeproof Megawatt frame details The Megawatt has a number of nice finishing touches. These include SRAM’s Universal Derailleur Hanger, room for a 500ml bottle (or 620ml with an adaptor), rubber frame protection boosted by a hard plastic fairing for the motor, a gear accessory mount and a collet style main pivot axle, which Nukeproof says improves frame stiffness. Rubberised protection keeps things quiet. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Cable routing is mostly internal, while the seat tube has been designed to allow for the maximum seatpost insertion. There’s tyre clearance for up to 2.6in tyres. Nukeproof Megawatt specifications and prices Four-pot brakes come on all three models. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media DT Swiss provides the hoops on the top two models. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Shimano also supplies the drivetrains. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media The Megawatt’s cockpit comes from Nukeproof’s own component line. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media DoubleDown carcasses and sticky compounds are a nice finishing touch from Nukeproof. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media The Nukeproof Megawatt is available in three spec options, with the Comp and Elite heading to stores on the 2 July, and the Factory bikes landing later in the month. Nukeproof Megawatt Comp Alloy Battery: Shimano EP8 with 504Wh Fork: RockShox Zeb Select 170mm Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select Drivetrain: Shimano Deore Brakes: Shimano Deore Wheels: Sun-Ringle Duroc Tyres: Maxxis Assegai 2.5in WT 3C MaxxGrip DD (f) Maxxis High Roller II 2.5in WT 3C MaxxTerra DD (r) Finishing kit: Nukeproof Price: £5,000 / $5,500 / €6,000 Nukeproof Megawatt Elite Alloy spec Battery: Shimano EP8 with 630Wh Fork: Fox 38 Performance Elite 170mm Shock: Fox X2 Performance Drivetrain: Shimano SLX Brakes: Shimano SLX Wheels: DT Swiss H1900 Spline Tyres: Maxxis Assegai 2.5in WT 3C MaxxGrip DD (f) Maxxis High Roller II 2.5in WT 3C MaxxTerra DD (r) Finishing kit: Nukeproof Price: £6,000 / $6,600 / €7,200 Nukeproof Megawatt Factory Alloy spec Battery: Shimano EP8 with 630Wh Fork: Fox 38 Factory 170mm Shock: Fox X2 Factory Drivetrain: Shimano XT Brakes: Shimano XT Wheels: DT Swiss H1700 Spline Tyres: Maxxis Assegai 2.5in WT 3C MaxxGrip DD (f) Maxxis High Roller II 2.5in WT 3C MaxxTerra DD (r) Finishing kit: Nukeproof Price: £7,000 / $7,500 / €8,200

Posted by
Bike Radar
6 - 30/06/2021 08:17:14

After sitting it out for a long time, Nukeproof now join the ebike game. They put a motor on the Mega and came up with the Megawatt 297 202ONE. We’ve taken the new Nukeproof eMTB for a test ride, featuring a Shimano EP8 motor, 630 Wh battery and 170 mm travel, and tell you how it performs on the trail. You can find almost everything a mountain biker’s heart desires at Nukeproof. Their portfolio has something for every discipline, from hardtail to full-suspension to full-on downhill bikes, the brand even offer kids and gravel bikes. Now Nukeproof have stepped into the electronic age, presenting the Megawatt 297 202ONE. Actually, development of the new eMTB began over two years ago, at the same time as the new Nukeproof Mega 2021, when Shimano approached Nukeproof with the then unreleased EP8 motor. It’s hardly surprising that the design of the Megawatt 297 202ONE has a lot in common with the analogue Mega. Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite Alloy | Shimano EP8/630 Wh | 170/170 mm (f /r) 24.32 kg in size M | € 7,199 | Manufacturer’s website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The new Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite Alloy 202ONE in detail Like the current Mega, the seat stays of the Megawatt run parallel to the top tube, the rocker link is neatly integrated, wrapping partially around the seat tube, and it uses similar Horst link suspension kinematics, all of which works so well on the Mega. On the Megawatt 297 202ONE, the suspension provides 170 mm travel front and rear. Regarding wheel size, Nukeproof rely on a mullet setup with a 29er up front and 27.5″ wheel on the rear. The 2.5″ wide tire on the rear fits with ease and Nukeproof promise clearance for up to 2.6″ wide tires, measured according to a strict British mud ride standards. The Mega and the Megawatt were developed in tandem. As such, their rear ends share similar Horst link kinematics. The forged rocker link neatly hugs the seat tube. The oversized bearings should offer a long service life. The tire clearance is wider than the English Channel. Nukeproof promise clearance for up to 2.6″ tires, even for muddy conditions such as those on the British Isles. Regarding the motor, don’t be fooled into taking the Megawatt by its name. The Shimano EP8 achieves an average output of just 0.00025 megawatts. The top half of the motor is neatly integrated into the aluminium frame while the bottom is protected by a hard plastic cover. The speed sensor has been integrated into the dropout and the corresponding magnet sits securely in the brake rotor. Nukeproof got creative with the battery concept: riders have the option of installing either a 630 Wh or a 504 Wh battery in all models. Swapping it is easy if you’ve got a little bit of experience with an Allen key. The top of the battery mount has two positions. To change the position, you simply have to loosen two bolts on the top of the down tube. So, if you want a lighter bike and don’t necessarily need the capacity of the 630 Wh battery, you can save yourself 800 g. With the large 630 Wh battery, the Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite Alloy weighs 24.32 kg (in size M) and costs € 7,199.99. The battery gets charged via the charging port in the seat tube. Alternatively, you can also remove the battery, but this takes a little time as you first have to loosen two screws at the bottom of the battery cover and completely remove one at the top before you can remove the cover and get to the battery. The battery doesn’t have a lock and can be removed with the same 4 mm Allen key required to remove the battery cover. The plastic battery cover is only connected to the frame at the top and bottom, sagging slightly in the middle. That creates a gap between the cover and the frame, allowing moisture to creep inside. Nukeproof have already announced that they will be using a revised, stiffer cover on the production models that will sit flush with the frame. Nukeproof are relying on a Shimano EP8 motor for their first ebike. The battery concept is innovative as it can be adjusted to be compatible with both 630 Wh and 504 Wh batteries. To remove the battery, you first have to unscrew the cover. Where there’s light, there’s darkness. The gap on the battery cover is a gateway for moisture. Nukeproof claim to have addressed this issue with a flush sitting battery cover on the production models. No, these are not bottle cage bosses, they secure the battery mount inside the down tube. If you want to instal a different Shimano battery in the Megawatt, you can adjust the position of the battery mount using these screws. To achieve longer ranges – regardless of battery size – the developers at Nukeproof have tuned the profile settings of the Shimano motor. The Megawatt 297 202ONE comes preconfigured with a Power and a Range profile. In the Power profile, the eMTB uses the full 85 Nm of the Shimano motor and unleashes its power a little earlier across all support modes. In the Range profile, the tuning of the motor is somewhat dampened, reducing the torque by 7 Nm overall, giving you 27 Nm in Eco mode, 63 Nm in Trail mode and 78 Nm in Boost mode. You can find all the details about the customisation options of the Shimano EP8 motor here. There is enough room in the front triangle to accommodate a 500 ml water bottle. If you use the special Nukeproof adapter, you can even squeeze in a 620 ml bottle. You’ll find additional bosses for a gear strap on the underside of the top tube There is enough room for a 500 ml water bottle under the shock, which occupies much of the front triangle. Nukeproof include a bottle cage adapter to make even better use of the limited space in the frame, allowing you to fit up to a 620 ml water bottle. There are more bosses located on the underside of the top tube. However, there is no space for a second water bottle, reserving these bosses for tools or a spare tube. Thanks to the oversized bearings and the universal SRAM UDH derailleur hanger, the Megawatt promises to be low on maintenance and spares are readily available. To eliminate chain slap, the drive side chainstay and seat stay are covered in generously sized protectors. Nukeproof were equally generous with the chain guide, which completely encloses the chain and can be adjusted. The Megawatt is only available in aluminium and Nukeproof won’t be offering a carbon version in the near future. You will have to learn to live with the fat weld seams, such as those on the head and seat tube. The massive down tube with its almost square cross-section also looks outdated and doesn’t match the remaining proportions of the Megawatt. The chainstay protector is generously dimensioned, extending far forward and intended to protect the frame from chain slap and keep the bike quiet. The seat stay also has a rubber protector. There’s an additional rubber patch stuck to the down tube between the motor and battery cover to protect the otherwise bare area from flying stones and the elements. Aluminium instead of carbon – the new Nukeproof Megawatt 297 202ONE will initially only be available in metal. The weld seams are part of the package. All internally routed cables enter the frame via an Acros headset. The cables in front of the cockpit are held in place by plastic clips and cable ties, though they could have been routed even more neatly along the handlebar to refine the look. Unfortunately, the cable routing at the rear end isn’t without its issues either. The brake and gear cables protrude noticeably as they exit the bottom bracket area instead of running close to the frame or through the chainstays. In addition, they’re connected by another cable clamp, spanning from one side to the other which is defenceless against mud and dirt from the rear wheel. All cables from the cockpit enter the frame via the Acros headset. This helps neaten the cockpit up to some extent. At the rear end, the brake and gear cables form a wide arc as they exit the frame and are joined together by a clamp, which is completely exposed to dirt from the rear wheel. The components of the Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite Alloy 202ONE Nukeproof are known for developing bikes with a heavy focus on downhill performance. According to Nukeproof, the intended use of the Megawatt is the same as their super capable Mega and Giga enduro bikes, which is noticeable in the components they chose. The eMTB is available in three builds, all of which come equipped with robust and performance-oriented components. Our test bike, the Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite 202ONE, is the mid-range build and available for € 7,199.99. It comes with FOX suspension consisting of a FOX 38 Performance Elite fork featuring the excellent GRIP2 damper up front and an X2 Performance shock at the rear. The drivetrain and brakes are taken care of by a Shimano SLX groupset, paired with 200 mm rotors front and rear. The Brand-X Ascend dropper post offers 150 mm travel in size M. It’s a shame since the short seat tube offers enough insertion depth to accommodate a 170 mm dropper post. A longer dropper post would give you more freedom of movement on the descents. Nukeproof rely on the first-class and easily adjustable suspension performance of the FOX 38 GRIP2 fork on the Megawatt 297 Elite. The FOX X2 shock sits vertically in the frame and controls 170 mm travel. The Brand-X Ascend dropper post offers 150 mm travel on the M frame. There’s room for improvement here. Despite the short seat tube, the frame can accommodate a longer dropper post. You’ll be able to upgrade if you want more freedom of movement on the descents. You can look forward to well-damped Nukeproof Sam Hill Signature Edition grips on all builds. For the tires, Nukeproof’s product managers opted for the heavier, though significantly more puncture-proof Doubledown casing from MAXXIS, both for the front and the rear. Up front, the soft MaxxGrip compound of the MAXXIS ASSEGAI ensures plenty of grip, deciding to go for the faster-rolling HighRoller II in the durable MaxxTerra compound on the rear. Excellent choice! Instead of saving weight, Nukeproof rely on the robust Doubledown casing from MAXXIS, allowing you to keep your tire pressure low. The MAXXIS ASSEGAI up front uses the grippy MaxxGrip compound… … and you’ve got the faster rolling HighRoller II in the durable MaxxTerra compound on the rear. They’re an excellent choice and Nukeproof have them fitted tubeless out of the box. Nukeproof’s first ebike comes fitted with their well-damped Sam Hill Signature Edition grips. Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite Alloy€ 7,200SpecificationsMotor Shimano EP8 85 NmBattery Shimano BT-E8036 630 WhDisplay Shimano SC-EM800Fork FOX 38 Performance Elite GRIP2 170 mmRear Shock FOX Float X2 Performance 170 mmSeatpost Brand X Ascend 125 – 170 mmBrakes Shimano SLX M7120 200/200 mmDrivetrain Shimano SLX 1x12Stem Nukeproof Horizon 50 mmHandlebar Nukeproof Horizon V2 780 – 800 mmWheelset DT Swiss H1900 29"/27.5"Tires MAXXIS ASSEGA/High Roller II DD 2.5"Technical DataSize S M L XL XXLWeight 24.32 kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) 120 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount no The Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Comp Alloy marks the entry to the line-up, going for € 5,999.99. It comes with RockShox suspension and a Shimano DEORE groupset. You have to cut back on the battery capacity since the entry-level version comes with the smaller 504 Wh battery. The € 8,199.99 Megawatt 297 Factory Alloy is the flagship model of the range. Nukeproof’s signature olive green paintwork harmonises perfectly with the golden accents of the FOX Factory suspension. The drivetrain and brakes are also taken care of by Shimano, though here you get to enjoy the performance of the XT groupset. Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Comp Alloy€ 6,000SpecificationsMotor Shimano EP8 85 NmBattery Shimano BT-E8035 504 WhDisplay Shimano SC-EM800Fork RockShox ZEB Select 170 mmRear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Select R 170 mmSeatpost Brand X Ascend 125 – 170 mmBrakes Shimano Deore M6120 200/200 mmDrivetrain Shimano Deore 1x12Stem Nukeproof Neutron Am 45 mmHandlebar Nukeproof Neutron V2 780 – 800 mmWheelset Sun-Ringle Duroc SD37 29"/27.5"Tires MAXXIS ASSEGA/High Roller II DD 2.5"Technical DataSize S M L XL XXLWeight 23.4 kg (manufacturer`s info)Max. payload (rider/equipment) 120 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount no Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Factory Alloy€ 8,200SpecificationsMotor Shimano EP8 85 NmBattery Shimano BT-E8036 630 WhDisplay Shimano SC-EM800Fork FOX 38 Factory GRIP2 170 mmRear Shock FOX FLoat X2 Factory 170 mmSeatpost BikeYoke DIVINE 125 – 185 mmBrakes Shimano XT M8120 200/200 mmDrivetrain Shimano XT 1x12Stem Nukeproof Horizon 50 mmHandlebar Nukeproof Horizon V2 780 – 800 mmWheelset DT Swiss H1700 29"/27.5"Tires MAXXIS ASSEGA/High Roller II DD 2.5"Technical DataSize S M L XL XXLWeight 23.9 kg (manufacturer`s info)Max. payload (rider/equipment) 120 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount no The geometry of the new Megawatt 297 202ONE The eMTB is available in five sizes from S to XXL. It grows evenly across the sizes, not making any large jumps from one size to the next and should be suitable for riders from 1.59 m to 2.10 m. The head angle is slack at 64° and the seat tube is short. On our size M test bike, it measures just 410 mm. This should allow you to decide between two frame sizes based on your preferred handling and not on the length of your legs. However, the 150 mm dropper post on the size M limits the choice in size for many riders. As such, it isn’t always possible to simply reach for the next larger or smaller frame size. The 442 mm chainstays are on the shorter side of things and the reach is compact at 455 mm. Size S M L XL XXL Top tube 577 mm 597 mm 612 mm 634 mm 656 mm Seat tube 380 mm 410 mm 440 mm 470 mm 500 mm Head tube 115 mm 115 mm 120 mm 130 mm 140 mm Head angle 64° 64° 64° 64° 64° Seat tube angle 77.5° 77.5° 78° 78° 78° Bottom bracket height 345 mm 345 mm 345 mm 345mm 345 mm Chainstay 442 mm 442 mm 442 mm 442 mm 442 mm Wheelbase 1,222 mm 1,242 mm 1,264 mm 1,288 mm 1,312 mm Reach 435 mm 455 mm 475 mm 495 mm 515 mm Stack 641 mm 641 mm 645 mm 654 mm 663 mm First ride review – Test riding the new Nukeproof Megawatt 297 202ONE Charge the battery and hit the trail. You will immediately notice the compact riding position on the Nukeproof in size M. With the seat post fully extended, the kink in the seat tube positions you far over the rear wheel. On flat terrain, the riding position on the Megawatt is relaxed, distributing your weight evenly between the grips and saddle. If you’ve only got fire road climbs to reach the trailhead, there’s hardly any reason to complain either. The riding position is good and the suspension offers lots of comfort. However, on demanding trails and steep climbs, the suspension bogs down, further slackening the seat tube angle and pushing your weight back. As a result, you must actively weigh down the front of the Megawatt on steep climbs to keep the front wheel planted. The short chainstays also add to this. Unfortunately, the Megawatt isn’t a great climber! As soon you head downhill, you will realise what this eMTB is made for. The suspension responds sensitively and offers lots of reserves to absorb big hits and misjudged landings. The only noise you’ll hear is the infamous rattling of the Shimano EP8 motor since the generously sized chainstay protector effectively dampens the chain. The traction offered by the excellent choice in tires, which are perfect for rough terrain with their Doubledown casing, and the active and plush suspension is top notch. That said, the Megawatt lacks the composure necessary to plough through rough terrain at full speed. Here it becomes clear that the Megawatt’s suspension doesn’t quite match the character of the bike, sabotaging rather than supporting it. You benefit from the agile and playful character through tight corners, not least thanks to the short chainstays. However, the lack of mid-stroke support offered by the rear suspension results in sluggish handling, not just dampening the hits but also the fun. When pumping through rollers and berms, the suspension absorbs your input rather than allowing you to generate speed. The potential freedom of movement offered by the short seat tube of the Megawatt is also lost to the short travel seat post fitted on the size M frame. Conclusion The Megawatt isn’t just very late to the eMTB party, it doesn’t add any more life to it either! Apart from the seat post, the bike is well specced, the pricing is competitive and the compatibility with two different batteries is a nice party trick. However, the frame lacks the level of finesse that other brands have now reached over several generations of ebikes. The Megawatt is yet to find its character, the concept needs refining – possibly with the next generation. We know Nukeproof can build brilliant bikes, as they have proven many times before! For more info, visit nukeproof.com Der Beitrag First ride review: the new Nukeproof Megawatt 297 Elite Alloy 202ONE 2022 erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
4 - 28/06/2021 20:17:14

It looks like a motorized Mega is on the way.( Photos: 2, Comments: 13 )

Posted by
Pinkbike