Channels/E-Bike

This channel is dedicated to everything E-Bike. Here you will find all the latest stories related to E-Bikes, from bike and gear reviews. To How-To videos, ride reports and action from races.

Latest Articles

10pts - 6 hours ago

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
16pts - 25/10/2020 09:00:45

No lift, no problem.( Photos: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
16pts - 24/10/2020 07:17:15

Way better than shopping in Paris.( Photos: 23, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
22pts - 23/10/2020 19:34:13

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
18pts - 23/10/2020 13:17:13

The facility will apparently produce 300,000 units in its first year with plans t...

Posted by
Pinkbike
22pts - 23/10/2020 09:17:13

NEW RISE: RISE BEYOND ...

Posted by
Sickline
24pts - 23/10/2020 09:17:13

Orbea recently invited a few brave souls out for a socially distanced preview of their new...

Posted by
Sickline
24pts - 23/10/2020 07:34:13

27.5”, 29”, or MX: which is best? The discussion rages on in forums, post-ride bar...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
18pts - 22/10/2020 19:51:13

Forget being able to buy a dirt bike, Alutech's latest project costs almost as mu...

Posted by
Pinkbike
28pts - 22/10/2020 18:00:43

Posted by
MTB-Mag

Latest Photos

10 - 6 hours ago

Sidi Dimaro Shoes   When you think Sidi, the image that most likely comes to mind is a pair of stiff carbon-soled shoes made from fancy Italian leather worn by an elite cross-country or road racer. While for many years that image may have been accurate, Sidi decided to flip the script with its newest model by going full enduro. The all-new Dimaro shoes are specifically tailored to suit the needs of gravity riders while retaining the top-quality design and construction that Sidi is known for. Our test riders decided to push these new Sidis to the limit on trail rides, shuttle runs and even some bike park laps. Here’s how the Dimaro shoes fared during our abusive gravity testing.   Tech features: Although Sidi is an expert when it comes to making stiff-soled shoes that maximize pedaling efficiency, the Dimaro shoes required a different approach. These gravity shoes needed to be able to work well with both clip or flat pedals and needed to have traction walking. They also needed to increase vibration damping for hard impacts. To accomplish these goals, Sidi teamed up with Vibram, a leader in manufacturing rubberized outsoles for footwear. Sidi designed the Dimaro shoes with an elastic heel cover to prevent dirt or debris from creeping into the shoes. A protective toe cap with microfiber materials for increased ventilation was added, and a lace-up closure system combined with a Velcro strap was used to keep the laces safely tucked away. The Dimaro shoes are offered in a range of sizes from 37–48, with our size-44 test shoes weighing 960 grams per pair (with cleats). Sidi sells its new gravity shoes for $149.99 per pair. Field test results: As soon as we put the new Dimaro shoes to the test, we quickly realized that the only thing these shoes have in common with other Sidi models is their top-notch construction and attention to detail. The Dimaro shoes feel nothing like other Sidi models we’ve tried, but our test riders were more than okay with that. These Sidi shoes are made to grace the feet of gravity riders instead of cross-country racers. We first removed the Dimaro’s flatpedal sole inserts and installed a pair of SPD cleats without using spacers. After a few rides, we confirmed spacers weren’t needed. Clipping in or out could easily be done without interference from the shoes. The Dimaros provided a comfortable fit with plenty of toe room and a reasonably wide footbed. We would have liked to see a Boa dial, considering the price point; however, a good hard pull on the laces held the shoes tight to our feet. The ankle cover was a welcome feature that kept dirt and rocks from getting into our shoes. Additionally, our test riders liked the simple Velcro strap that tamed our laces and seemed to help secure the fit. After a few hours of pedaling and hiking, the Dimaro shoes continued to feel great. Not once did our test riders experience hot spots or discomfort with these new shoes. As far as gravity shoes go, the Dimaro’s price point is near the top. That said, Sidi tends to deliver a premium product that is worth a higher price tag. If an elite gravity shoe is something you’ve been searching for, then add the Sidi Dimaro to the top of your wish list. Hits Lightweight gravity shoes Comfortable fit with a roomy toe box Misses Top-tier pricing Star Rating ★★★★★   www.actionathletesupply.com Subscribe Or Renew Here ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION MAGAZINE For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 The post Electric Bike Action Product Test: Sidi Dimaro Shoes appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
16 - 25/10/2020 09:00:45

No lift, no problem.( Photos: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
16 - 24/10/2020 07:17:15

Way better than shopping in Paris.( Photos: 23, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
22 - 23/10/2020 19:34:13

E-BOOM ELECTRIC BIKE SHOP Lee Ann McKay and business partner Robin Coffman are avid cyclists, and four years ago after falling in love with e-bikes, they decided to open an e-bike shop. To get up and going, they started by going to Interbike to research all the available brands before finally opening a shop in Whitestown, Indiana, a northern suburb of Indianapolis. Co-owner Lee Ann McKay.   With the nearest bike shop was nine miles away, they couldn’t have picked a better location, and a community need was instantly filled. As Lee Ann says, “We couldn’t turn them away!” Not to alienate any cyclist in need, the shop did repairs and maintenance on any bike that was rolled through the front door. Not only has this kept the wrenches spinning, but it’s also increased sales in parts and accessories. Originally, BH was the e-bike brand they started with, but have since expanded to include Bulls, Magnum, E-Lux and Gazelle. With the constant evolution of new e-bike technology, they make sure to keep up with all the latest technology and bike brands making their way to the market. Co-owner Robin Coffman.   QUARANTINE SALES & SERVICE While the shop’s sales through the pandemic aren’t as high as they were a year ago, they’re still going strong. The service department is booming, and sales are strong on the lower-priced e-bikes. There is still an overall uptick in the people getting back on bikes. It makes Lee Ann happy to see more and more families riding together. When a bike comes in for maintenance, it gets cleaned and disinfected before it’s brought into the shop. Lee Ann quips that she thinks some of the bikes that come in covered in spiderwebs are probably safe anyway. Something else the shop does is pick up and drop off bikes for maintenance or sale. This has proven to be an invaluable service for people quarantined at home and can’t come to the shop. In addition to the recreational riders, three of the local police departments in Boone County, where the shop is located, have bought bikes from eBoom. When they sell an e-bike, they offer a short lesson on safety, about 15 minutes long, especially for older riders and first-time e-bike riders. They’re looking at expanding that and making a longer class. Bikes lined up for service during COVID-19.   SOCIAL MEDIA HELP They’re members of a local Facebook group called Zionsville Moms. Zionsville is a suburb near the shop, and the group started talking about the bike shop. This social proof caused an instant surge in business. Couple that with the massive rise of gravel bikes in the area and they had to start carrying gravel bikes. Now, they carry Salsa gravel bikes, the first non-electric bikes they carry. They’re looking to get in some electric gravel bikes and wanted to start with BH, but there’s no inventory yet, so they’re considering Bulls and a few other brands. Since there is no legal place to ride e-mountain bikes in the area, the shop puts its main focus on commuters and hybrids. Currently, they are working with lawmakers to change this, and they have a mountain bike resort going in north of them, so the e-MTB situation may change soon. ORGANIZED RIDES The shop organizes two weekly gravel rides with the ride broken down into two groups: a 25-mile ride with a 16-mph pace and a 20-mile loop with a 10–12-mph pace. These rides have been a great source of community outreach for the shop, and it’s helped increase the number of people riding bikes in the area. They are planning on adding a weekly 5–10-mile family ride, which Lee Ann calls a “slow roll”, so all family members of all ages can enjoy the ride on traditional and e-bikes. e-Boom Electric Bike Shop is located at 6 South Main Street, Whitestown, IN 46075. Their number is (317) 340-4156, and website is www.eboomelectricbikes.com. Subscribe Or Renew Here ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION MAGAZINE For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 The post Bike Stop: E-Boom Electric Bike Shop appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
18 - 23/10/2020 13:17:13

The facility will apparently produce 300,000 units in its first year with plans to increase that to 900,000 in the future.( Photos: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
22 - 23/10/2020 09:17:13

NEW RISE: RISE BEYOND -The new Rise trail eMTB brings you closer to the feeling that less “e” means more “bike”. -The Rider Synergy (RS) concept enhances the passion for MTB with the Rise’s subtle assistance that feels as natural and alive as your own movements. Riding on trails with the electric momentum of an ebike is exciting, but as ebikes get more powerful, something important is lost. The smooth, natural experience of riding a mechanical MTB goes away. If the goal is to climb more, descend more and have more fun, then there’s no need to sacrifice simplicity, responsiveness, excellent handling or weight. The Rise was born with a new eMTB philosophy: to bring fluid autonomy to an ebike, where power, distance, interface and weight are addressed as a single, cohesive system. This is the Rider Synergy (RS) concept. RIDER SYNERGY Rise is a machine designed to expand your trail experience and bring you closer to the moment Minimal, advanced and simple. With our commitment to the Rise’s four pillars of design – power, range of autonomy, interface and weight– you won’t find any distractions that prevent you from connecting deeper with the trails you ride. RS POWER The idea of creating our own power plant for Rise was daunting, but we believed that this would be the only way to realize our goal of a complete RS system for trail bikes. We had been looking for the best way to achieve this for a long time, so when Shimano shared the plans for their new EP8 motor, we quickly realized that this awesome engine offered us the perfect platform on which to build the RS Power concept. The maximum torque of the EP8 RS motor is 60Nm, with a power map designed to match your pedaling and cadence in a subtle, natural yet energetic way. The motor delivers maximum power when you are pedaling the strongest: the harder you pedal, the more power it will deliver. The instant power transmission is quiet and unnoticeable, yet it’s sensitive and ultra responsive to your output, encouraging you to keep pedaling. To accommodate riders’ different needs, Rise is configured with two RS Stem profiles, Profile 1 and Profile 2, which can be adjusted in a few seconds with the Shimano E-tube app. RS RANGE Rise is intended for big rides. It features a modular battery solution that provides up to 612wh, combining a very light and compact 360wh main battery integrated in the down tube with a patent-pending 252Wh range extender. The RS concept provides a great day on the trails because the lighter bike, lower power consumption and of course, the pedal-friendly weight and assistance extends battery life by a factor of over 1.5x. This means the 360Wh RS Battery of Rise delivers ride times and ranges similar to a 540Wh battery in a typical eBike. The 2.2Kg main battery might be one of the lightest and slimmest examples out there. Housed in a strong and reliable alloy case, this energy bank is based on the newest 21700 cell that provides a higher rate of charge/discharge and ultimately much better battery life and heat management. Our RS Range Extender gives you an additional 252Wh (70%) of exploration. Adding the RS Range Extender gives ride times comparable to a 900Wh battery on a regular ebike. That’s 8 hours and over 4,000m of climbing in Eco mode. RS INTERFACE The elegance of simplicity is undeniable. Many riders spend hours removing excess weight, noise and visual distractions from their bikes. We have embraced data collection with cycling computers and smartphones but often stop short of attaching large displays on our handlebars or top tubes. With a traditional ebike, displays, sensors, extra wires and large glowing buttons are standard and unavoidable. For us, the option of a traditional, uncluttered machine is a critical aspect of the RS philosophy. The RS Interface is sleek, but doesn’t lack expandability. The simplest configuration consists of a discreet rocker switch near the left brake lever to control assistance level and a small, inline junction box with two tiny LEDs that provides support mode info and smartly broadcasts wireless data. The bike’s power button is located at the bottom of the seat tube, with all wiring guided internally. The charge point is located on the side of the seat tube. A sealed cap protects it from mud and water and includes a secure closure that also locks the Range Extender cable once it’s connected. Additionally, we integrated the Garmin world into the RS ecosystem, giving you all the info you need on your Garmin, watch or cycling computer. RS WEIGHT The RS system, motor, battery and electronics are significantly lighter than other ebikes – a result of the RS system’s unique power delivery. The new bike tops in at 16.2 kg on the M LTD and 17.5 kg on the M Team. Manuals, quick direction changes and playful handling characteristics are not normally associated with eBikes, but the sporty Rise takes a big chunk out of that “conventional wisdom” and the result feels quite a bit like your favorite trail rig. Rise was given the same ultralight frame construction as Occam and Rallon, making it one of the lightest eMTB frames in the market with 2.3 kg of OMR carbon. PERSONALIZATION And Orbea’s exclusive MyO program?, which is available with Rise, opens up millions of color and component combinations so you can create the ultimate, one-of-a-kind bike of your dreams. The post Orbea launches the Rise eMTB appeared first on Sick Lines - mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource.

Posted by
Sickline
24 - 23/10/2020 09:17:13

Orbea recently invited a few brave souls out for a socially distanced preview of their new Rise eMTB in the hills outside of Boise, ID. The mix of long climbs, and motorized trail access made Boise a great spot to checkout Orbea’s latest eMTB. The Rise is the output of Orbea’s multi-year journey to create an eMTB that rides a lot like a normal mountain bike. Orbea worked closely with Shimano to create torque and power limited profiles for the EP8 motor which create a much more natural pedaling experience. They also made great strides in reducing the overall weight. I’d estimate the test bike that I rode was a hair under 40 lbs. The impact of the combined power and weight reductions creates a ride experience that is vastly different from the 50 lb eMTBs we’ve become used to. We started our day by knocking out a 7 mile climb, ascending roughly 3000 vertical feet. The first thing I noticed about the Rise is there’s no display making for a surprisingly uncluttered cockpit. Sitting on the bike, there’s an updated but familiar thumb control to toggle between the 4 assist modes (no-assist, eco, trail, boost). Instead of a display there are just couple small LEDs to indicate that power is on and which climb mode you’re in. It’s worth noting that with Shimano’s E-Tube app or a Garmin you view all of the data in the Shimano display and more. Visually, the Rise seems clean, simple, a bit closer to a traditional MTB and something meant to just ride rather than fiddle with. Pedaling in ECO mode, the assist is light and just enough to compensate for the extra weight of the battery and motor. In ECO the Rise feels like a 25 lb bike instead of shy of 40. Moving to Trail mode, the assist bumps up considerably but in a stealthy smooth way. The work Orbea and Shimano put into tune the assist shines in this mode. Jumping up to Boost, it finally feels like quite a bit of assist, closer to what Trail feels like on a normal eMTB. For certain, these are just initial impressions. I need some long days to sort this out. After making quick work of what would have been a painfully boring climb without a motor, we finally got to point the Rise downhill. Three things were immediately apparent, the Rise changes direction easier, allows for later braking, and is far more playful than I thought possible with an eMTB. With geometry and travel similar to Orbea’s Occam trail bike, my first impression is that the Rise is confident descender but tends strongly to play over plow. It’s a properly responsive trail bike with sharp steering but never felt nervous. I need to spend some time on some harder trails to see what it’s capable of. We kept it legal and rode moto trails. Ripping down what the motos climb, we found a couple really fun deep sand turns to roost. The flickablity of the Rise makes foot out drifting a blast. Light weight makes it effortless to snap it back and nail the exit. The Rise is e-hooliganism. Even coasting at low speeds it’s possible to pop off small trail features. Jibbing on an eMTB? Yes. New paragraph but I’m just going to continue talking about how playful the Rise is. I’ve been riding eMTBs for a couple years now and one thing that I dislike is the weight makes them really hard to get off the ground except at higher speeds. Between the weight, geo, and pop of the Fox DPX2 shock, the Rise just loves to bounce and play. Like nose manuals? No problem. J-hop a rock? On it! Boosting little roller gaps? Easy peasy. Yeah, I kinda like this thing. The uncluttered cockpit, smooth shifting, the fact that it rides like a mountain bike. Very cool. I’ve got a long term test bike in-bound, deeper insight to follow. I keep wondering what the real-world range will be like with the 360 wh battery with the torque limited EP8 motor. Will I miss the brute force of a full power motor or love the smoother feel? How much vert can I squeeze out of it? Has Orbea melded the best of MTB and eMTB into a package that could make me a full time eMTB convert? Will I loose all my friends if I do? Keep an eye on the site in the coming months for a the full write up. The post Orbea Rise eMTB – First Impressions appeared first on Sick Lines - mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource.

Posted by
Sickline
24 - 23/10/2020 07:34:13

27.5”, 29”, or MX: which is best? The discussion rages on in forums, post-ride bar stops, and late-night discussions between friends. We open up Pandora’s box of wheel sizes and call on hard science to help you find the best size for your eMTB. Since the dawn of mankind, there have been arguments. Should the woolly mammoth be cooked medium or well-done? Evolution vs creation? Nature vs nurture? Even the classic question of which came first, the chicken or the egg? The cycling industry has its own never-ending argument too: which is the best wheel size? googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Five years ago, wheel size choice was simple. 26” wheels were on their knees and 27.5” was the new wonder child. 29” wheels existed but still sat on the fringes, quirky, cultish and reserved for bearded Californian types. Fast forward a few years and everything has changed. In the analogue bike world, 27.5” has been backed into a corner and 29” is taking control. Even those who were proud wearers of “26 Till I Die” t-shirts now sheepishly ride round on 29ers, secretly enjoying the smoother and more confident ride. It’s time to set the record straight. What are the pros and cons of 29” vs 27.5” wheels or is a mixed setup the best option for an eMTB? What wheel size options are there? There are now three wheel configurations on the market relevant to eMTB users. The classic 26” wheel is long gone, superseded by 27.5”. Initially most eMTBs were offered with 27.5” wheels as (if correctly built with the same spokes and rim) they are stronger than the equivalent 29er wheel. That said, nowadays many eMTBs have sized up, playing to the advantage of the bigger wheels’ smoother rolling characteristics. Some brands, including Canyon, Fantic, Merida and many more, use mixed wheel sizes, similar to motocross bikes, with a larger 29” wheel up front for stable steering and improved rollover and a smaller 27.5” wheel at the back, allowing for quicker acceleration and shorter chainstays for improved agility and playful handling. How do these different configurations impact the feel and handling of the eMTB? Your wheel diameter is not what’s written on the tire’s sidewall We are about to open your eyes to the Matrix. If you measure your 27.5” or 29” rims, you will find that they do not measure 27.5” or 29”. Not even close. This confusion dates back to 26” wheels, where the 26” dimension actually relates to the approximate measurement of the wheel with a 2” tire fitted, not just the size of the rim itself. With the more recent release of 29ers, nobody rode 2” tires anymore, so a bigger 2.25” tire was included as part of the size designation. If you measure the rim bead seat diameter of your wheels, it should conform to the official ETRTO (European Tyre and Rim Technical Organisation) guidelines that define the internal measurement of tire bead diameter. You will find that 27.5” rims and 29” rims measure 584 mm (23”) and 622 mm (24.5”) respectively. The actual outside diameter of your wheel will depend on the tire fitted, so taller, high volume tires will result in a ‘bigger’ wheel. For example, a 27.5” wheel fitted with a high volume 2.8” tire, is almost the same outer diameter as a 29” wheel fitted with a 2.4” tire. So which wheel size is best? With so many variables at play including rider height, rider weight, riding style, terrain and bike geometry, this question is impossible to answer simply. However, we can inform you about the benefits of each wheel size and in turn, knowing all the facts, you will be able to make your own informed decision about which wheel size will work best for you. Is a smaller wheel a stronger wheel? The wheels of your eMTB are subject to a lot of abuse, carrying you over rough ground and taking the impact of each and every obstruction on the trail. Compared to a non-motorised bike, the increased weight and torque of an eMTB increases the physical demands on your wheels. Comparing wheel sizes, the increased leverage from the longer spokes of a 29” wheel during cornering, braking and impacts puts increasing demands on the structural integrity of the larger wheel. If you compare identical wheel builds (rim, spokes, spoke tension and hubs), simple physics tells us that the increased spoke triangulation and reduced leverage of the smaller wheels will always be inherently stronger than larger wheels. To compensate for the decreased strength to weight ratio, 29” wheels need to be either heavier or made from more expensive material like carbon fibre. Answer: While riders at the higher end of the permissible system weight may still prefer the added security of a smaller and stronger 27.5” wheel, with 29” wheels now being used by downhill racers, both wheel sizes can be considered strong enough for eMTB riding. Does a wider tire offer more grip? Where your tire contacts the ground, the footprint it leaves on the ground is called the contact patch. The size and shape of the contact patch are governed by many factors such as tire pressure, tire construction and tire and rim dimensions. The lower the pressure, the more your tire will deform and be free to ‘wrap’ around the terrain you are riding over, increasing the contact patch size. Grip and friction go hand in hand and therefore the larger the contact patch of the tire, the more grip but also more friction which can impact the rolling speed of the tire. Accepting some generalisations, changing the wheel size has less impact on the contact patch shape and size than you may think. The main contributing factors to contact patch size are air pressure inside the tire and tire load (weight pushing down on the tire). Crunching the numbers, the difference between contact patch size of a 29” and 27.5” wheel is almost identical assuming the same tire width and unlikely to be something you can feel on the trail. What happens if you fit a wider tire? One benefit of running a smaller 27.5” diameter wheel at the back of an eMTB is that it leaves more physical space to fit a wider tire, often up to 2.8″ – in contrast, most 29” eMTBs will be limited to 2.5” tires. As previously mentioned, the main contributing factors to contact patch size are air pressure inside the tire and tire load, not width. If you double the width of the tire but retain the same air pressure and load, the length of the contact patch will halve, but it will double in width and the overall contact patch area will be almost the same. However, if the pressure in the wider tire is lowered, then the contact patch will increase in size. The increased volume of the wider tire allows you to run a lower air pressure, significantly increasing the size of the contact patch and therefore the grip available from the rear tire. As with many theoretical models, contact patch size calculations have limited impact in the real world as they assume no tread on a tire that’s rolling on a flat surface. The tread pattern of the tire, casing used and durometer (softness) of the rubber compound it’s made from will have a much bigger impact on the actual contact patch, increasing or reducing grip, rolling speed and traction. Therefore, rather than thinking about grip and rolling speed in terms of wheel size, it’s better to focus on picking the most suitable tire tread pattern and pressure for the riding conditions. We have a tire group test that guides you through the process of finding the tire that’s right for you. Answer: A larger diameter wheel will have an almost identical contact patch size to a smaller diameter wheel at the same width and pressure. Tire pressure and tread pattern play a larger role in determining grip. A wider tire at a lower pressure will result in more grip given the same profile and compound. Does a smaller wheel accelerate faster? Anyone who has stood on a skateboard, before quickly ending up flat on their face will understand that small wheels accelerate quickly. At this point, you have to prepare yourself for some high-school physics. When a mass is free to rotate around an axis (in this case the tire, rim and spokes rotating around the axle), torque must be applied to change its angular momentum (the rotational equivalent of linear momentum). The input required is described by the moment of inertia, which determines the torque required to accelerate a wheel. The higher the moment of inertia, the higher the resistance of a wheel to changes in rotational speed i.e. acceleration and deceleration. The moment of inertia of a mass point is defined as mass x radius2. We can quickly see that given the same mass, a smaller wheel radius will lower the moment of inertia and thus less torque is needed to accelerate and decelerate the wheel. In our scenario from above, for identical wheel builds (spokes, rims, hubs, tires) the shorter spokes and smaller diameter rim of a 27.5” wheel will result in less mass and of course, smaller radius, lowering the moment of inertia. A larger wheel will have a higher moment of inertia and thus be slower to accelerate given the same torque. Importantly, it will also be slower to decelerate, so will maintain its momentum more effectively if all other factors are equal. That’s the science, but by how much do 27.5” and 29” wheels differ? If we take two theoretical wheels based on real weights from a leading manufacturer, a 27.5” wheel with a combined rim and tire weight of 1430 g, and a 29” wheel with a rim and tire weight of 1530 g (for the sake of simplicity we will exclude the weight of the spokes, valve and hub). The 29” wheel is around 7% heavier than the 27.5” wheel and taking into consideration it’s larger radius, the moment of inertia of the 29” wheel will be approximately 20% higher than the 27.5” wheel (making some simplifying assumptions). This makes the 29” wheel harder to accelerate, requiring more torque to get up to the same speed. On the flip-side, the higher moment of inertia indicates that the 29” maintains its momentum better, leading to a smoother and more stable ride. However, the moment of inertia is only a part of the complex equation when it comes to which wheel size maintains its speed the best. To answer this question, not only rotational but also translational energy plays a factor in the equation. The rotation of the wheel is accompanied by translational movement parallel to the ground. The energy embodied in that translational motion is determined by the mass and velocity (with the size of the wheel itself playing no role here). Therefore, the total energy of the spinning wheel is the sum of the translational (determined by mass and velocity) and rotational (determined by the moment of inertia and rotational speed) energy. So for our case, where the 29” wheel is both heavier and has a higher moment of inertia than the 27.5” wheel, the former will maintain its momentum more effectively. Answer: A 27.5” wheel may be the better option if you ride trails that need frequent changes in velocity or for riders who like to pump to generate speed, requiring less energy to accelerate and brake. If you ride flowing trails that focus on maintaining your momentum, then it’s at speed, a larger 29” wheel will hold onto it more effectively. Is a 29” wheel smoother down the trail? One of the most common arguments in favour of 29” wheels is that they roll better. Is this true? Yes. A larger diameter wheel is less likely to drop into a hole and stays in contact with obstructions for longer, contributing to a smoother ride feel. Ignoring suspension and the deformation of the tire for a second and focussing purely on wheel size, when a wheel contacts an obstacle it forms a virtual ramp – think of it as a line connecting the top of the obstacle with the contact patch of the tire. This ramp is the direction the wheel has to move in to travel up and over the obstacle or the angle of attack. The steeper this angle, the harder it is for the wheel to get up and over the obstacle. If we consider this in the simplest way, assuming no other effects such as the deformation of the tire, a bigger wheel moves the contact patch away from the obstacle, reducing the angle of attack and the force required to overcome it, thus making it easier for the wheel to roll up and over the obstacle. As an extreme example, think of a shopping trolley – even the smallest kerb will stop the tiny wheels dead. A 29” wheel will roll more easily than a 27.5” wheel, with a smaller angle of attack when it rolls over obstacles. The larger the obstacle, the larger the positive effect of a bigger wheel will be. Compared to a 27.5” wheel, a 29” wheel can reduce this ramp angle by up to 5% (the reduction is greatest on larger obstructions). While this may not sound like much, over thousands of impacts during a ride this soon adds up to lower rolling resistance and less fatigue on the trail. The inherent stability of a 29” bike is also increased by the position of the bottom bracket with respect to the wheel axles, sitting further below them (relative to a 27.5” wheel) and lowering the centre of gravity in relation to the wheels’ centre of rotation. However, the physical size of the bigger 29” wheel can be problematic at the rear of a bike, reducing the space between the rider and the wheel on steep terrain – if you’ve been hit up the ass by your tire on steep terrain, you know what we’re talking about. Answer: Assuming identical tire widths and pressures, a 29” wheel will roll more smoothly and more efficiently down a rough trail than a 27.5” wheel. So do we have a winner? Now we understand how the physical properties of a wheel influence the way it rolls, accelerates and responds to impacts, we can better understand which wheel size may best suit our riding styles. Why choose 27.5” wheels? 27.5” wheels offer properties that will appeal to riders who enjoy trails that require agility and frequent changes of speed. Given the same rims, spokes and hubs, a 27.5” wheel is stronger than a 29” wheel and may be more suitable for very heavy riders. At the rear, 27.5” wheels permit increased frame clearance (without negative impacts on the chainline) so those looking for maximum grip for technical climbs will be able to fit a wider tire to allow for the use of lower pressures. Smaller riders will find 27.5” wheels easier to manoeuvre and more agile. 27.5” wheel positives Accelerates easier Brakes easier More room for wider tires = equal lower pressure = bigger contact patch = more grip Why choose 29” wheels? 29” wheels are best suited to riders looking for the smoothest ride on rough trails and who enjoy carrying speed along a trail. 29” wheels roll over obstacles more efficiently than 27.5” wheels and maintain more momentum. Taller riders will find more balance on the larger wheel size, but they offer many advantages for average height riders too. 29” pros Carries momentum more efficiently Increased rollover ability Smoother ride Why choose an MX mixed wheel size? Mixed wheel size eMTBs with a 29” front wheel and 27.5” claim to offer the best of both worlds and in many ways are a good compromise for riders of average height looking for versatile up- and downhill performance. The 29” front wheel smooths out obstructions on the trail, while a wider 27.5” rear tire provides maximum grip for technical climbs. For those looking for increased agility and downhill performance on the steepest trails, running a standard width 27.5” rear tire with a heavy-duty casing gives lots of clearance for throwing gymnastic shapes through the switchbacks. Mixed wheel size pros 29” front wheel increases rollover ability Wider rear tire for maximum traction More room for the rider to move around on steep trails Should you buy a bike on wheel size alone? We have learned from experience that you should never assess the suitability of a bike based on a single parameter, wheel size included. There’s no ideal size for everyone and instead, wheel size is simply another parameter to consider when choosing the eMTB that best suits your riding style and expectations. When it comes to the overall handling and enjoyment of an eMTB you also need to consider rider height, local terrain, suspension design and the geometry of the bike. A great place to find a bike that will work for you is in our group tests, where we assess each eMTB as a whole. When it comes to which wheel size is best, well, just like the chicken and the egg, that argument will rage on. Der Beitrag 27.5” vs 29” – Which wheel size is best for your E-Mountainbike? erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
18 - 22/10/2020 19:51:13

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Pinkbike