Channels/E-Bike

This channel is dedicated to everything E-Bike. Here you will find all the latest stories related to E-Bikes, from bike and gear reviews. To How-To videos, ride reports and action from races.

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0pts - 4 hours ago

Harley-Dav...

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Electric Bike Action
3pts - 12/12/2019 21:34:16

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Electric Bike Action
4pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

The guiding principle of the Whyte E-180 RS V1 is “performance over everythi...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
8pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

For the new top-end XYRON 927, Conway rely on the 2020 Bosch motor, a carbon frame...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

Have eMTBs got better in 2020? Is the new Bosch motor really as good as everyone s...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
6pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

The most important question for most e-mountainbikers is the maximum range. Howeve...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

How do a bottle cage and a dual crown fork fit together? Specialized have complete...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

With the new Simplon Rapcon Pmax, the Austrian brand seems to be shaking off its d...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
0pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

Oversized tubes, sexy details and the most powerful motor on the market: the Haibi...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

It looks like 2020 will be the best year in eMTB riding yet! We put 25 of next sea...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine

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0 - 4 hours ago

Harley-Davidson E-Bikes-Coming Soon These are prototype models that are shown above but as soon as we get the inside scoop on Harley’s new e-bikes, Electric Bike Action will let you know. Harley-Davidson promises their first electric pedal-assist bicycles will be light, fast, and easy for anyone to ride. They’ll be designed to stand-out in urban environments and this all-new line of eBicycles is just one more example of how Harley-Davidson is actively working to inspire a new generation of two-wheeled riders around the world. Not yet available for sale. All future models shown may not be available in all markets. www.harley-davidson.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Harley-Davidson E-Bikes-Coming Soon appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
3 - 12/12/2019 21:34:16

Mountain Bike Suspension SAG Setup 101 WARNING: Although this video is intended to be entertaining, the technical information it contains is accurate. www.ridefox.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Video: Fox Shox Mountain Bike Suspension SAG Setup 101 appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
4 - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

The guiding principle of the Whyte E-180 RS V1 is “performance over everything”. We’re the first magazine in the world to be able to review this bike, so we can tell you if Whyte’s eMTB debut is a success. Click here for an overview of the best eMTB 2020 group test. Whyte E-180 RS V1 | Bosch Performance Line CX/625 Wh | 180/180 mm (f/r) | 24.88 kg (size L) | € 6,999 | manfacturer website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Whyte have wanted to bring an eMTB onto the market for a long time. However, the British bike brand didn’t want to compromise on the handling of the bike and decided to wait for the new, more compact Bosch Performance Line CX motor. Once the motor became available, Whyte mounted it to the € 6,999 Whyte E-180 RS V1 at an angle. Doing so allowed them to place the internal 625 Wh battery as low as possible, positioned in front of the motor rather than on top of it. Components, weight and technical details of the Whyte E-180 RS V1 This goes to show how much more Whyte were concerned with weight distribution on their 180 mm travel eMTB than the total weight of 24.9 kg. The primary focus was clearly on balanced handling, good suspension and functional componentry. The rear end of the Whyte E-180 RS V1 is designed in such a way that dirt and mud have nowhere to collect. Keeping the rest of the design just as clean, Whyte use their integrated seat clamp system, have integrated the speed sensor into the dropout and have designed their own cover for the charging socket. Nevertheless, the E-180 RS V1 still has room for improvement in terms of cable routing and finish. We also have to mention that during the course of the test, the seat stay on our bike broke at a weld seam near the rear brake. This was quickly replaced and we didn’t have any further problems, so this can be attributed to a one-off. material defect or error. Unfortunately, the aluminium frame will only be available in two sizes. How low can you go?Whyte wants to keep their bikes’ centre of gravity as low as possible. Although the integration of the tilted motor could be refined a little more, we’re big fans of the concept. BulkyThe Bosch Purion Display offers all the relevant data at a glance and is easy to operate, but it’s quite bulky. Black is the new goldThe FOX 36 Performance Elite fork with the top-end GRIP2 damper is in no way inferior to the Factory model with the eye-catching Kashima coating. Whyte E-180 RS V1€ 6,999SpecificationsMotor Bosch Performance Line CX 75NmBattery Bosch PowerTube 625WhDisplay Bosch PurionFork FOX 36 GRIP2 Elite 180 mmRear Shock FOX DHX2 Factory 180 mmSeatpost Crankbrothers Highline 150 mmBrakes SRAM CODE RSC 200/200 mmDrivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle 1x12Stem Race Face Atlas 35 35 mmHandlebar Race Face Turbine R 780 mmWheelset WTB KOM Trail i30 27.5"Technical DataSize M LWeight 24.88 kgPerm. total weight 139 kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) 114 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount noSpecific Features Pre-production failOur test bike was one of the first models Whyte produced. One of the welds on the non-drive side seat stay cracked. Whyte assured us that the weld area has been refined for the production models. Better than the originalThe cover Whyte designed for the charging socket works much better than Bosch’s original version. They’ve also positioned it so that it’s protected from dirt and easy to reach. Geometry and size of the Whyte The geometry of the Whyte E-180 RS V1 is equally trimmed towards maximum downhill performance. The super long front triangle (480 mm reach) instils you with confidence and gives you plenty of freedom of movement. Unfortunately, Whyte have initially confined themselves to frame sizes M and L, so shorter riders will have to look elsewhere for now. Size M L Seat tube 432 mm 457 mm Top tube 605 mm 633 mm Head tube 120 mm 130 mm Head angle 64.0° 64.0° Seat angle 75.5° 75.3° Chainstays 444 mm 444 mm BB Height 336 mm 336 mm Wheelbase 1,241 mm 1,271 mm Reach 455 mm 480 mm Stack 626 mm 635 mm Helmet Fox Flux MIPS | Backpack Fox Utility Hydration Pack | Shirt Fox Flexair Gothik Jersey | Shorts Fox Ranger Camo Cargo | Shoes ION Rascal Select googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The Whyte E-180 RS V1 on the trail The Whyte E-180 RS V1 is a comfortable climber. Despite the long front triangle, the pedalling position feels only slightly stretched thanks to the tall front end and the relatively steep seat tube angle. The low bottom bracket requires you to carefully time your pedalling to avoid clipping your pedals on obstacles but results in a planted ride. That means the front wheel stays firmly on the ground while the rear end generates plenty of traction, which, together with the powerful motor, makes easy work of difficult climbs. It’s not the total weight but its distribution that’s crucial: thanks to the super low placement of the battery, the Whyte’s handling is phenomenal. All the efforts to keep the centre of gravity as low as possible on the Whyte E-180 RS V1 pay off on the descents. Except for the FOCUS, no other bike in the test field was as easy to get onto the rear wheel or pop off obstacles. Thanks to the robust and grippy MAXXIS Assegai tires and the excellent tune of the suspension, the Whyte generates tons of grip and securely holds its line: whether in corners or on off-camber sections. The long front triangle and the slender top tube offer plenty of freedom of movement and the relatively high front end of the E-180 RS V1 inspires you with confidence when things get steep. The faster and rougher the trail gets, the more the Whyte is in its element. It takes big jumps and high drops in its stride and shrugs off the nastiest rock gardens. Despite the plush suspension, it provides a lot of feedback from the trail and playfully weaves around obstacles, no matter how fast you’re going. On flowy and easy trails, the E-180 RS V1 quickly gets bored, though it remains composed and agile. Only the loud chain slapping and the relatively annoying clacking of the Bosch motor cloud an otherwise excellent impression. Bitter after taste: one of the weld seams on the seat stay of our pre-production test bike cracked. According to Whyte, that shouldn’t happen on the production models. Tuning tip: chainstay protector to prevent chain slap Riding Characteristics 7AgilitysluggishplayfulStabilitynervousstableHandlingdemandingbalancedRiding funboringlivelyMotor feelingdigitalnaturalMotor powerweakstrongValue for moneypoortopApplicationForest road 1Flow trail uphill 2Flow trail downhill 3Technical single trail uphill 4Technical single trail downhill 5Downhill tracks 6 Conclusion The Whyte E-180 RS V1 is made for the toughest enduro and downhill trails. There, the handling is balanced and comes very close to that of a non-motorised mountain bike. However, the fact that handling was Whyte’s primary focus also shows in the finish and somewhat rudimentary details, which in places are lacking. Topsmountain bike-like handlingsensible and robust componentryit won't hold you backFlopsrudimentary finishonly two frame sizesloud on the descents You can find out more about the Whyte E-180 RS V1 at whyte.bike. The test field You can find everything you need to know about our test for the best eMTB of 2020 right here! All bikes in test: BULLS SONIC EVO AM 6 | Cannondale Moterra 1 | Canyon Spectral:ON 9.0 | COMMENCAL META POWER 29 TEAM 2020 | CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon | CUBE Stereo Hybrid 160 HPC | FANTIC XF1 180 Race | FOCUS JAM² 9.9 DRIFTER | Giant Reign E+ 0 Pro | Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 | Liteville 301 CE MK1 | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 10K | Moustache Samedi 27 Trail | Norco Range VLT C1 | NOX Hybrid Enduro 7.1 | Orbea WILD FS M-LTD | Pivot Shuttle 29 | Rocky Mountain Altitude Powerplay Carbon 90 Rally Edition | ROTWILD R.X750 ULTRA | SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax | Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert | Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo | Trek Rail 9.9 | Whyte E-180 RS V1 | YT DECOY CF Pro Race Relaxed and comfortable riding on surfaced roads, both uphill and downhill.↩Easy climbs up trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate incline.↩Active and playful descents on easy trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate slope.↩Single-track climbs on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and occasionally extreme inclines.↩Singletrack descents on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and small jumps as well as some very steep descents.↩High speed descents on sometimes very rough trails with large jumps and obstacles that you can’t roll over.↩The rating used for riding characteristics refers to the bikes in the group test and the current state of development of eMTBs. The best bikes managed to blend supposedly opposite riding characteristics, feeling both lively and stable at the same time. The handling describes the balance of the bike on downhill sections. The information regarding motor-power refers to the ride-feeling in the overall context of the bike and not exclusively to the motor – that’s why the same motor can present different values.↩Der Beitrag Whyte E-180 RS V1 in Review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
8 - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

For the new top-end XYRON 927, Conway rely on the 2020 Bosch motor, a carbon frame and an all-new design. This is the best looking CONWAY yet, but how will it ride? Click here for an overview of the best eMTB 2020 group test. CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon | Bosch Performance Line CX/625 Wh | 140/140 mm (f/r) | 21.49 kg (size M)€ 7,999 | manufacturer website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); In the past, CONWAY’s eMTBs were often criticised for their rudimentary finish and look. However, the CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon is one of the most beautiful and slender bikes in the test field: the lines of the € 7,999 full-carbon flagship model are clean and elegant and the Bosch Performance CX motor and 625 Wh battery are very neatly integrated into the bike. Components, weight and technical details of the CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon The in-house designed 820 mm wide carbon handlebar and stem combination is very nice to look at too and it keeps the weight of the XYRON 927 to a minimum. The suspension, consisting of a matching RockShox Pike Ultimate fork and Super Deluxe Ultimate shock, delivers 140 mm front and rear travel. Although the CONWAY Xyron 927 is aimed more at easy-going trail riders than enduro racers, CONWAY specs a pair of SRAM Code RSC brakes with a huge 220 mm rotor up front – thumbs up! Only the best was good enough for the remaining componentry with shifting taken care of by a wireless SRAM X01 AXS groupset. The only thing we couldn’t get on-board with was the short 125 mm RockShox Reverb AXS dropper post. DisappointmentThe Bosch motor is beautifully integrated into the XYRON. Unfortunately, CONWAY made less of an effort with the speed sensor and continue to rely on a spoke magnet. Full integrationThe motor and chain guide fit perfectly on the frame of the XYRON 927. AnchorEven trail riders benefit from downhill brakes. Thanks to the 220 mm rotor up front, the CONWAY has loads of braking power. CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon€ 7,999SpecificationsMotor Bosch Performance Line CX 75NmBattery Bosch PowerTube 625WhDisplay Bosch PurionFork RockShox PIKE Ultimate 140 mmRear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate 140 mmSeatpost RockShox Reverb AXS 125 mmBrakes SRAM CODE RSC 220/200 mmDrivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle 1x12Stem CONWAY HB Set n/a mmHandlebar CONWAY HB Set 820 mmWheelset DT Swiss HXC 1200 SPLINE 27.5"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 21.49 kgPerm. total weight 130 kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) 108 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount noSpecific Featuresintegrated carbon cockpit Wide and stiffCONWAY have elegantly combined the handlebar and stem into a single carbon component. However, at its standard width of 820 mm, it’s very stiff and uncomfortable. For light riders onlyThe lightweight DT Swiss carbon wheelset combined with the APEX casing of the Schwalbe tires is fine for smooth trails. However, if you take the XYRON down rocky trails, you’ll have to be careful with your line choice. RestrictedThe 125 mm RockShox Reverb AXS dropper post (size M) is simply too short. Geometry and size of the CONWAY The geometry of the CONWAY XYRON is anything but radical. Most noticeable here is the low front end. With our test bike in size M, the stack height amounts to just 595 mm. Size S M L XL Seat tube 400 mm 430 mm 460 mm 490 mm Top Tube 577 mm 601 mm 624 mm 647 mm Head angle 66.0° 66.0° 66.0° 66.0° Seat angle 75.0° 75.0° 75.0° 75.0° Chhainstays 450 mm 450 mm 450 mm 450 mm Wheelbase 1,183 mm 1,207 mm 1,231 mm 1,255 mm Reach 425 mm 449 mm 469 mm 489 mm Stack 595 mm 595 mm 604 mm 613 mm Helmet iXS Trigger AM | Backpack CUBE EDGE HYBRID | Shirt GORE C5 Trail Trikot | Shorts GORE C5 All Mountain | Knee pads Fox Enduro Knee Sleeve googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon on the trail Although the CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon is rather compact, the pedalling position is stretched even for tall riders. This is not due to a long front triangle, but because of the low front end in combination with the super-wide 820 mm handlebar pulling the rider forward. While this stretched position isn’t the most comfortable on long rides over flat terrain, it pays off on steep climbs. With so much weight on the front wheel, it never wants to lift and you can stay on track no matter how winding and tight the climb gets. All the while, the 2.6″ wide Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires and the rear suspension generate enough traction to transfer the Bosch’s 75 Nm to the ground. Incidentally, we don’t recommend running the tire pressures too low to avoid damaging the delicate carbon rims of the DT-Swiss HXC 1200 wheelset. Look at it! CONWAY’s new XYRON platform makes for a beautiful looking bike. CONWAY’s world is upside down: here, descending is only a means to an end and it’s all about the climbs. With its very low front end, you permanently feel like you might go over the bars as soon as you hit a moderate descent. The cockpit, wheels and frame can be described in two words: extremely stiff. As a result, almost all vibrations and shocks are passed on to the rider and especially their wrists. Apart from that, the rigid front wheel of the CONWAY XYRON 927 constantly gets knocked off line from impacts. This results in unpredictable handling on rough trails and requires a very experienced and equally strong rider to keep under control. Except for really compact berms, the stiffness of the XYRON 927 has it fighting to maintain traction through loose corners and off-camber sections. The 820 mm wide, one-piece stem and handlebar combo on the XYRON 927 is silly: it’s too wide and way too stiff. You could shorten it, but that would make it even stiffer! Tuning tip: narrower handlebar with more rise | longer dropper Riding Characteristics 7AgilitysluggishplayfulStabilitynervousstableHandlingdemandingbalancedRiding funboringlivelyMotor feelingdigitalnaturalMotor powerweakstrongValue for moneypoortopApplicationForest road 1Flow trail uphill 2Flow trail downhill 3Technical single trail uphill 4Technical single trail downhill 5Downhill tracks 6 Conclusion The CONWAY XYRON 927 is the cross-country race bike equivalent of the eMTB world. It’s too uncomfortable even for leisurely rides on smooth roads. We can’t help but feel that the form of the CONWAY XYRON 927 has come before function: it’s great to look at but feels limited mainly to climbing on the trails. Topsstunning designexcellent motor and battery integrationbrilliant climberFlopsuncomfortable pedalling positiontoo stiff, zero reserves and over-the-bar feelings on the descentsshort dropper You can find out more about the CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon at conway-bikes.de. The test field You can find everything you need to know about our test for the best eMTB of 2020 right here! All bikes in test: BULLS SONIC EVO AM 6 | Cannondale Moterra 1 | Canyon Spectral:ON 9.0 | COMMENCAL META POWER 29 TEAM 2020 | CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon | CUBE Stereo Hybrid 160 HPC | FANTIC XF1 180 Race | FOCUS JAM² 9.9 DRIFTER | Giant Reign E+ 0 Pro | Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 | Liteville 301 CE MK1 | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 10K | Moustache Samedi 27 Trail | Norco Range VLT C1 | NOX Hybrid Enduro 7.1 | Orbea WILD FS M-LTD | Pivot Shuttle 29 | Rocky Mountain Altitude Powerplay Carbon 90 Rally Edition | ROTWILD R.X750 ULTRA | SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax | Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert | Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo | Trek Rail 9.9 | Whyte E-180 RS V1 | YT DECOY CF Pro Race Relaxed and comfortable riding on surfaced roads, both uphill and downhill.↩Easy climbs up trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate incline.↩Active and playful descents on easy trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate slope.↩Single-track climbs on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and occasionally extreme inclines.↩Singletrack descents on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and small jumps as well as some very steep descents.↩High speed descents on sometimes very rough trails with large jumps and obstacles that you can’t roll over.↩The rating used for riding characteristics refers to the bikes in the group test and the current state of development of eMTBs. The best bikes managed to blend supposedly opposite riding characteristics, feeling both lively and stable at the same time. The handling describes the balance of the bike on downhill sections. The information regarding motor-power refers to the ride-feeling in the overall context of the bike and not exclusively to the motor – that’s why the same motor can present different values.↩Der Beitrag CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon in Review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
4 - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

Have eMTBs got better in 2020? Is the new Bosch motor really as good as everyone says? Where are all the batteries and why did we test an electric downhill bike? After completing our big E-MOUNTAINBIKE group test of 25 bikes, we summarised the most exciting trends and insights we gleaned from it. This is eMTB in 2020! The developments in the e-mountain bike market are coming thick and fast. With each new generation of motor, numerous brands churn out entirely new frames. Battery capacities beyond 1000 Wh are just as common these days as motors with torque outputs which every VW Polo would be jealous of. Where will it end? If you ask us, an arms race of spec figures such as these won’t necessarily lead to better bikes. Because what really counts is not the spec sheet, but the size of your grin! We’re yet to find a scientific way of measuring this. However, we’ll tell you what we do know about the hottest bikes of 2020: 1. Everyday hero More often than not, eMTBs go beyond sports or leisure equipment and form a part of modern everyday mobility. We used to ride to the trails with the bike in the boot of our car. Thanks to eMTBs, the adventures can now start right on the doorsteps of a lot of riders. Whether you have to navigate the concrete jungle or the downhill track to do so should be irrelevant on such an expensive bike. The ideal eMTB performs well in both situations. Some manufacturers such as Bulls and Rotwild have already thought of this with the MonkeyLink mounting system, which is connected to the ebike battery and allows you to snap on lights for the morning commute within seconds. If you want to hit the trails in you lunch brake, the lights come off just as quickly. Brands such as Trek have included a stand mount on their high-end performance eMTB. The only problem here is that we’re yet to find a suitable stand that is light, sturdy and quiet enough not to affect your riding on the trail. 2. Integration and ergonomics In 2014, we conducted the first of our big E-MOUNTAINBIKE group tests to review the best bikes of the year and compare them head-to-head. At the time, internal batteries, integrated multitools and smart lighting systems were as much a distant dream as fail-safe speed sensors that don’t require a spoke magnet. Fortunately, those times are over – oh no, not yet! Even in 2020, many brands still fail to properly integrate the speed sensor into the frame although there are well-thought-out solutions available for all the motors. Wide handlebars, dropper post, charging sockets and powerful motors have become standard and are often fully integrated into the eMTB. Luckily, a lot has happened in terms of usability and ergonomics. Good saddles offering long-distance comfort are just as common on bikes these days as a tidy cockpit. Handlebars cluttered with cables and remotes are a thing of the past, not least thanks to wireless components or smart cable routing. Exceptions confirm the rule, the massive remote on the Haibike offers countless on-the-fly adjustments, but it makes the all-important dropper post lever hard to reach. Merida, on the other hand, show how its done: you could find the right levers even if you were blindfolded. 3. Are we too heavy for our eMTBs? According to the bike industry, many of us are probably too fat. At least with some brands, such as Haibike, Merida, Focus or Rotwild, where the maximum payload is less than 100 kg. Although the total weight limit only provides a legal framework, it can have an impact on your guarantee and warranty claims if you exceed it. Even bikes with a very high total weight limit aren’t always ideal for riders who regularly exceed the 90 kg mark on the scales – which we would never consider as “too fat”, by the way :). The YT DECOY with a respectable maximum payload of 127 kg comes with thin-walled MAXXIS EXO and EXO+ tires and carbon rims. Here, heavier riders will have run their tire pressures very high to avoid damaging the tires or rims on the first metres down a rocky trail – loss of grip included. The Liteville 301 CE Mk1 offers a max. payload of a whopping 127 kg, but it comes with a small 180 mm brake rotor on the rear. Even lighter riders will make these glow red hot on long descents. Incidentally, Rocky Mountain don’t give a weight limit for the frame of the Altitude Powerplay Carbon. For a lot of brands, there is still a lot of confusion surrounding the subject. The Rocky Mountain has to have a weight limit for it to function properly: over a certain weight you have to exceed the maximum pressure in the shock and fork for it to perform adequately. Honestly: in that case we’d rather you give us a low weight limit at which the bike is actually able to perform on the trail. 4. Configuration options: your bike should be as unique as you are Let them talk all they want: you think neon yellow, dark brown and purple is a cool colour combination? Then order your bike in exactly these colours. Orbea’s online configurator, MyO lets you freely choose and combine the colours for the frame and the decals. Trek will also be offering the Rail in their Project One configurator from December 2019, allowing everyone to have a unique paint-job for their bike. Even if you’re not that bothered with the colours of your bike, we still recommend taking a look at the bike configurator, if available, such with the Simplon or Liteville. Besides componentry such as the fork, brakes, tires, etc., the bike can also be adapted to your body size. Given the right frame size, you can often choose the right coil weight or the length of the dropper post. That way you get the best performance out of your bike from the start. Everyday accessories such as fenders or a high-quality lighting system are often available as optional extras as well. Without tape and cable ties – mostly. 5. Optics question in the command center The trend with displays is clearly going… in no direction at all. As in the group tests of years gone by, the test field included everything from minimalist solutions without a display to high-resolution displays on which every 14-year-old would like to play Minecraft all day, as on the Haibike. Passionate trail riders that we are, we have to admit that we’re biased towards minimalist solutions. Maybe it’s just because command centres like on the Haibike can give you a lot exciting live data but don’t yet offer any real added value besides. None of the large displays on test had a smart navigation feature, a setup guide or a Spotify playlist. However, there is one thing we can all agree on: the display has to be well protected in the event of crash and still be easy to read. That’s why, with one exception, all brands designed their own mounts for the KIOX display instead of leaving it high up on the stem. In this exposed position, it will get damaged very quickly if you crash and you can’t simply turn your bike upside down for quick repairs or the like. One more KIOX tip: if you’re predominantly out on rough trails, we recommend fastening the display to the mount with a small screw. Believe us, you’re unlikely to ever see your display again if it falls of on the trails. 6. Nobody should have to ride a loud bike anymore One thing is clear: with up to 120 Nm torque, the motors on our test bikes have a lot of power. Have you ever heard an absolutely quiet sports car? We haven’t either. For the time being, we will have to get used to the noise of the motor under full load. However, we can no longer accept other sounds such as rattling cables, batteries and paint-eating chains! Bikes like the Specialized Levo or the MERIDA eONE-SIXTY have managed to reduce the background noise to an absolute minimum. Other brands still have plenty of catching up to do here, like the Giant with its much too short chainstay protector or the COMMENCAL with untidy, rattling cables at the cockpit. But you can also find a remedy without having to go as far as YT and lining the cavities around the motor with rubber foam. A few cable ties at the cockpit and a little rubber tape on the chainstay and your nerves, sorry ears, are spared. Honestly, dear bike manufacturers: if we can do it, you can too! 7. Chainstay protection or not: Bosch motors rattle on the descents We’ll start off by saying that we’re huge fans of the new Bosch Performance Line CX motor. The eMTB mode and the easily controllable Turbo mode are a lot of fun on the trail. However, we had the same problem on all bikes with Bosch motors: the chain seems to be constantly hitting the frame, but that can’t be, because in most cases, the manufacturers provide sufficient chainstay padding. The sounds come from inside the Bosch motor. With the chain tensioning as the suspension compresses, the chainring transmits these forces to the motor. Because some components inside the motor have too much play, this results in a rattling noise. With some motors, it’s very pronounced and always present on the trail, while it is significantly quieter in others. Bosch have promised to work on this. The cavity inside the frame and the design of the rear end also plays a major role in how loud the bike is. 8. Dropper post too short = massive design fail There is no component that has had such a big impact on mountain biking in recent years as the dropper post. It has become a standard feature on eMTBs as well. We think: the longer, the better. Too bad that many frames such as the FANTIC don’t offer enough insertion depth for long dropper posts. Liteville, Bulls and Rotwild are pioneering a new approach here by integrating the Eightpins dropper into the frame with special seat tubes, offering up to 228 mm travel. But even conventional designs can give you enough travel. With particularly compact dropper posts such as the OneUp Components V2, you can squeeze out a lot more usable dropper post travel out of many frames 9. Function, design or both? Design aficionados beware! Not every bike that looks fast with its clean, straight lines in the pictures in magazines and on websites actually turns out to be fast on the trail. But we’re not trying to say that ugly bikes usually perform better on the trail either. As we all know, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. But we hate it when the optical design of a bike or a component comes at the cost the trail performance. Need an example? The top tube of the Rotwild RX 750 bruised the knees of all our testers. The 9 cm top tube is approximately 4 cm wider than the average in the test field. The shape and proportions of it are beautiful, but on the trail it unnecessarily limits your freedom of movement. The Conway Xyron is one of the best looking bikes in the test field – as long as you don’t sit on it: the one-piece carbon cockpit so stiff that in combination with the stiff carbon frame and wheels, all vibrations are directly transferred to your hands. But there are exceptions also, such as the beautifully designed Simplon Rapcon Pmax with its striking lines and hidden cable routing, which delivers and equally convincing performance on the trail. Admittedly, we are fans of beautiful bikes and could spend hours looking at the FOCUS JAM² 9.9 DRIFTER. 10. Suspension can only perform as well as it’s tuned: the settings do it! If you want to have a good time on your eMTB regardless of the weather, it’s down to your inner attitude. If you’re in the mood to ride, your bike is just as ready as you are. The adjustment of the fork and shock to your individual needs is no less important. Some suspension gives you countless dials you can turn to fine-tune everything, while others only offer basic settings. Nevertheless, you can noticeably improve the performance of your bike with the right setup. But if you get it wrong you can turn your expensive eMTB into a sack of potatoes: it doesn’t matter if you only have one adjustment dial or four, a dual crown fork, an air shock or coil shock. Brands like Specialized or Norco make it easy for you to find the right basic setup with their online setup guides. If you decide to for a coil sprung shock, you should determine the correct coil weight before leaving the shop. 11. Are heavy bikes suddenly good? Is more battery capacity really always better? Yes and no: the weight distribution is much more important than the total weight. The Whyte is prime example, although it is the second heaviest bike in the test field. The brand from the United Kingdom has tilted the Bosch motor to position the battery and thus the centre of gravity as far down and centrally between the wheels as possible. Despite weighing 25 kg in total, it is easier manual than many bikes weighing less than 22 kg. Of course, the lightest bikes in the test field are noticeably quicker, more agile and usually more fun on flowing trails. As you know, we don’t believe there is one perfect battery size. More battery capacity usually means more weight, which usually worsens the weight distribution and lifts the centre of gravity. Therefore, the battery system should suit your needs. Dual battery systems offer the advantage that you can lighten up your bike relatively quickly for short after-work rides. A lot of eMTB developers are probably already composing a nasty email in response to our criticism. Admittedly, we are looking for things to critique. The fact is that almost all eMTBs of 2020 are damn good and a lot of fun. Nevertheless, we still see a lot of potential regarding integration, usability and, above all, more pragmatic and practical solutions for day to day use. In the biggest E-MTB test in our history, we go into detail on this and many more exciting findings. If you want to know what the best E-MTB currently available is, and what really makes a good e-mountainbike then give it a read! Diese und viele weitere spannende Erkenntnisse stammen von dem größten E-MTB-Test in der Geschichte von E-MOUNTAINBIKE. Wenn ihr wissen wollt, welches aktuell das beste E-MTB ist und worauf es bei einem E-Mountainbike wirklich ankommt, dann schaut hier vorbei. Der Beitrag Where is this all going? 11 E-MTB trends and findings from our 2020 group test erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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6 - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

The most important question for most e-mountainbikers is the maximum range. However, you should probably be asking yourself which E-MTB battery concept suits you the best! You can find an overview of all the most popular battery solutions here. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The first question you should ask yourself is: “How do I ride my E-MTB? Or more importantly, how do I want to ride it?”. This way you will find out which battery concept suits you best. Do you spend the majority of your ride in Eco mode or at full power? What about your weight? Riders weighing more than 90 kg will suit a different battery system than those weighing in at 60 kg. How far is the furthest ride you want to do and what elevation gain does it include? Depending on the intended use of your E-bike either modular concepts, integrated batteries or external batteries will make the most sense. Standard system Internally integrated batteries have become standard on eMTBs. The advantages of internal batteries are mainly down to the look and usually the option of mounting a bottle cage in the front triangle. Our experience and the results of our reader survey show that you seldomly need more than the standard internal battery capacity, ranging from 500 to 700 Wh depending on the model. Who is this for? Basically for everyone. Only riders who plan on riding very long distances, ride in very mountainous terrain with a lot climbs, are very heavy or consistently use the highest support mode might need more battery capacity. Topsvery balanced handlingoptimal frame integrationusually accommodates a bottle cage in the front trianglestreamlined designFlopsnone Costs none Interchangeable battery Interchangeable batteries are the simplest addition to the standard system if you want more range. Who is this for? If you do a lot of riding bike parks or trail centres, you can quickly swap the battery in your lunch break and put the other one on charge. For the occasional long-distance ride or Alpine epic, you can carry the replacement battery in a special ebike backpack with a back protector, though you’ll have to be okay with additional weight on your back. Topslots of flexibilityno restrictions on bike handling you quickly swap the battery; offers sufficient capacityFlopswhen transported in a backpack: additional weight on your back instead of the bike Costs Specialized 700 Wh: € 1,300 Bosch PowerTube 625 Wh (vertical/horizontal): € 899 Bosch PowerTube 500 Wh (vertical/horizontal): € 759 Shimano BT-E8010, 504 Wh: € 589 Shimano BT-E8035, 504 Wh: € 669 FOCUS T.E.C. Pack The T.E.C. Pack system from FOCUS consists of a small 378 Wh integrated battery and an additional external battery offering another 378 Wh. In contrast to other dual-battery systems, the integrated battery on the FOCUS isn’t removable and significantly smaller than the competition, which keeps the bike looking slender and the handling agile. Who is this for? For those who want a light and agile bike: without the additional battery, this system is ideal for quick after-work and generally shorter rides, and light riders or those who predominantly use the lower support modes. With additional battery attached, this bike is also capable of longer outings. Topswithout the additional battery attached, the handling is better and more agile than the standard systems with 500-700 Wh batteriesno unnecessary weight for short ridesflexibilityFlopsAdditional battery changes the handlingAdditional battery has a poor capacity to weight ratio (FOCUS 378 Wh: 2.22 kg, Bosch 500 Wh: 2.59 kg)internal battery isn't removable – you can only charge it on the bike! Costs zero, because FOCUS include the T.E.C. Pack as standard for 2020 Dual battery system The dual-battery system includes a standard internal 500-630 Wh battery in combination with an optional, 250-500 Wh external battery, which you can attach to the down tube of the bike. Examples of brands using this system include SIMPLON, Orbea, Norco, and Giant. Who is this for? Dual battery systems are ideal for heavy riders and those who often ride longer distances. They’re also perfect for rides in places without the appropriate charging infrastructure or Alpine epics. TopsDepending on the design, there are no drawbacks compared to the standard system without the additional battery attachedSome bikes will accommodate a bottle cage as long as the additional battery isn't taking its placemakes extreme capacities of over 1,000 Wh possibleFlopsAdditional battery changes the handlingOn some bike, the bracket for the additional external battery spoils the looks Costs Orbea: € 199 for the battery mount + € 719 for the PowerPack 500 Simplon: € 1,000 Norco: € 499 Giant: about € 400 Fast charger Besides the standard chargers, most motor manufacturers offer smaller travel chargers and larger fast chargers. Who is this for? Fast chargers are ideal for charging you bike at the trail centre, bike park or on long rides. We’ve already charged our bikes in pizzerias, at mountain cabins and in bike parks, but before you go plugging your charger into any outlet you find, please ask The only downside to fast chargers is that they are a lot larger and heavier than regular chargers. For further information you can read our article on fast-chargers. Depending on the brand, there are big differences in the speed of the charging times – especially with Bosch and Shimano, we don’t see the “fast” in their “fast-chargers”. Here you have to ask yourself whether the slightly faster charging time is worth the extra cost. With Shimano, Bosch and Giant you save about 1.5 hours for a full 500 Wh charge compared to the standard device. With the TQ system, you save 1 h 40 min to fully charge a 630 Wh battery. TQ 10-A fast-charger: approx. 80% of 630 Wh in 1 hour Giant fast-charger: approx. 60% of 500 Wh in 1 hour Bosch fast-charger: 40% of 500 Wh in 1 hour Shimano STEPS EC-6000: 80% of 504 Wh in 2.5 hours Topsno restrictionsless weight than an additional battery in your backpackFlops Costs Shimano STEPS EC-6000: about € 130 Bosch fast-charger: € 169 Giant fast-charger: € 169.90 TQ 10-A fast-charger: € 349 In the biggest E-MTB test in our history, we go into detail on this and many more exciting findings. If you want to know what the best E-MTB currently available is, and what really makes a good e-mountainbike then give it a read! Der Beitrag An overview of the most important eMTB battery systems erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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How do a bottle cage and a dual crown fork fit together? Specialized have completely overhauled the Turbo Kenevo Expert for 2020, equipping it with the same motor and battery as the current Levo in an attempt to unite opposites. The Turbo Kenevo looks like a thoroughbred downhill bike purpose-built for bike parks and the wildest tracks. But looks can sometimes be deceptive. Click here for an overview of the best eMTB 2020 group test. Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert | Specialized 2.1/700 Wh | 180/180 mm (f/r) | 24.20 kg (size S4) | € 6,899 | manfacturer website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Components, weight and technical details of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert The Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert isn’t the only bike in the test field with 180 mm travel at the front and rear, but nonetheless, it immediately stands out from the crowd. The Kenevo is the only bike in the test field to rely on a RockShox BoXXer dual crown fork, which you’ll usually only find on proper downhill bikes. The suspension is completed by a RockShox Super Deluxe Coil shock. However, as we don’t categorise bikes based on their travel, so we won’t do it based on looks either. The € 6,899 Kenevo is a typical Specialized and makes no secret of its kinship with the Levo. The aluminium frame features the same asymmetric brace at the shock as well as Specialized’s proprietary Turbo Connect Unit (TCU) housed in the top tube. You also get Specialized’s 2.1 motor which puts out up to 90 Nm torque and is fed by an internal 700 Wh battery. You decide……which size Kenevo suits you. Thanks to the short seat tubes, you can choose the frame size according to your personal preferences regarding reach and stack. Double DThe days when you couldn’t find a dropper post on a bike with a dual crown fork are over on the new Kenevo. UnusualGranted, with the BoXXer the Kenevo looks more like an all-out downhill bike. But after some time on the bike, you quickly get used to the 180 mm travel dual crown fork. Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert€ 6,899SpecificationsMotor Specialized 2.1 90NmBattery Specialized M2 700WhDisplay Specialized TCUFork RockShox BoXXer Select RC 180 mmRear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Coil Select 180 mmSeatpost Specialized Command Post IRcc 130 - 160 mmBrakes SRAM CODE R 200/200 mmDrivetrain SRAM GX 1x11Stem Specialized Direct Mount DH 45 mmHandlebar Specialized Alloy 800 mmWheelset Roval Alloy DH 27.5"Technical DataSize S2 S3 S4 S5Weight 24.2 kgPerm. total weight 161 kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) 136 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount noSpecific Featuresfully functional even without cockpit remoteMission Control Appintegrated multi tool You’re the boss.Thanks to the TCU in the top tube, the Kenevo offers all the functions you need without having to use the remote on the handlebar. However, the Remote is so compact and ergonomic that it never bothered us on the Kenevo. MismatchedThe Kenevo is the fastest and most capable descender in the test field. The braking power of the SRAM CODE R-brakes without the SwingLink lever just can’t keep up. Simply quietThe ridges of the chainstay protector silences the drivetrain just as effectively on the Kenevo as it does on the Levo. Haters gonna hateThanks to the SWAT bottle cage on the Kenevo, you can always take along the water and tools you need on trails outside of the bike park and far away from the next apres bike hut. Geometry and size of the Specialized Specialized have realised that eMTBs can no longer be categorised in size according to the length of their seat tubes. Instead, the short seat tube of the Kenevo and the long dropper posts allow you to choose the frame size according to the desired length of the top tube. Size S2 S3 S4 S5 Seat tube 400 mm 420 mm 440 mm 465 mm Top tube 585 mm 612 mm 639 mm 666 mm Head tube 105 mm 115 mm 125 mm 135 mm Head angle 64.0° 64.0° 64.0° 64.0° Seat angle 77.0° 77.0° 77.0° 77.0° Chainstays 454 mm 454 mm 454 mm 454 mm BB Height 345 mm 345 mm 345 mm 345 mm BB Drop 14 mm 14 mm 14 mm 14 mm Wheelbase 1,234 mm 1,263 mm 1,293 mm 1,322 mm Reach 445 mm 470 mm 495 mm 520 mm Stack 605 mm 614 mm 623 mm 632 mm Helmet Fox Dropframe | Goggle Fox Main Stars | Jersey ION Seek Amp Tee | Pants ION Seek Amp Jeans googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert on the trail How does a bike with a dual crown fork climb? The answer: just as well as it would with a regular single crown fork! Despite its bulky appearance, the Kenevo Expert gets up even the most technical climbs. With its super-steep seat tube angle, the rider is positioned centrally between the wheels and in combination with the long front triangle the front wheel is kept sufficiently weighted. As a result, the front wheel stays planted on the ground and only starts lifting on the most extreme climbs despite the very “long” fork. But let’s be honest, if you’re interested in the Kenevo, you’ll want to know how it climbs in Shuttle mode, the most powerful support level that you’ll first have to activate via the Mission Control app. The Specialized 2.1 is based on the Brose motor system, but compared to other bikes, despite losing its natural ride feel this powerful support mode remains bit better to control even on technical climbs. The Kenevo does less well on technical climbs that have to be ridden slowly. The 11-speed SRAM GX drivetrain simply doesn’t have a big enough gear range to get up slow, high-cadence climbs. The Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert is much more than just a downhill bike with a motor. One thing is clear: the 24.2 kg Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert is a big bike. No matter how rough the terrain, it remains composed, planted and super precise. Whichever line you attempt to ride, with the Kenevo you’ll be able to! Despite the long travel, the suspension remains well defined and always provides the rider with enough feedback from the trail. All of this also makes the Kenevo surprisingly easy to get airborne. The steeper and the faster the trail gets, the more fun you’ll have on the Kenevo. However, on tight, winding trails you eventually pay the price of the tall front end and the long front triangle. You have to actively weight the front of the bike to successfully manoeuvre it around the corners on flat terrain. As composed as the Kenevo is, it requires a lot of rider input to move it around at slower speeds. Tuning tip: 220 mm brake rotor up front Riding Characteristics 7AgilitysluggishplayfulStabilitynervousstableHandlingdemandingbalancedRiding funboringlivelyMotor feelingdigitalnaturalMotor powerweakstrongValue for moneypoortopApplicationForest road 1Flow trail uphill 2Flow trail downhill 3Technical single trail uphill 4Technical single trail downhill 5Downhill tracks 6 Conclusion The Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert is much more than just a downhill bike with a motor. Even if it excels in rough terrain at high speeds and hitting jumps in the bike park, it will also get you back to the top of the trail with ease. The large battery, the excellent system integration and numerous details round out the Kenevo package. Topsno limits on the descentsconfidence inspiring on steep terraingreat motor integrationuseful app to tune the support levelslarge selection of frame sizesFlops11-speed drivetrainbrakes not powerful enough for the bike’s hard-riding purposeboring on easy trails You can find out more about the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert at specialized.com. The test field You can find everything you need to know about our test for the best eMTB of 2020 right here! All bikes in test: BULLS SONIC EVO AM 6 | Cannondale Moterra 1 | Canyon Spectral:ON 9.0 | COMMENCAL META POWER 29 TEAM 2020 | CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon | CUBE Stereo Hybrid 160 HPC | FANTIC XF1 180 Race | FOCUS JAM² 9.9 DRIFTER | Giant Reign E+ 0 Pro | Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 | Liteville 301 CE MK1 | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 10K | Moustache Samedi 27 Trail | Norco Range VLT C1 | NOX Hybrid Enduro 7.1 | Orbea WILD FS M-LTD | Pivot Shuttle 29 | Rocky Mountain Altitude Powerplay Carbon 90 Rally Edition | ROTWILD R.X750 ULTRA | SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax | Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert | Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo | Trek Rail 9.9 | Whyte E-180 RS V1 | YT DECOY CF Pro Race Relaxed and comfortable riding on surfaced roads, both uphill and downhill.↩Easy climbs up trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate incline.↩Active and playful descents on easy trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate slope.↩Single-track climbs on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and occasionally extreme inclines.↩Singletrack descents on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and small jumps as well as some very steep descents.↩High speed descents on sometimes very rough trails with large jumps and obstacles that you can’t roll over.↩The rating used for riding characteristics refers to the bikes in the group test and the current state of development of eMTBs. The best bikes managed to blend supposedly opposite riding characteristics, feeling both lively and stable at the same time. The handling describes the balance of the bike on downhill sections. The information regarding motor-power refers to the ride-feeling in the overall context of the bike and not exclusively to the motor – that’s why the same motor can present different values.↩Der Beitrag Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert in Review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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4 - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

With the new Simplon Rapcon Pmax, the Austrian brand seems to be shaking off its dusty image: visually, all sights are set on trail performance. Thanks to its customisable spec, balanced handling and optional dual battery system, the Rapcon Pmax promises to be a good choice for a broad range of riders. How will it fare? Click here for an overview of the best eMTB 2020 group test. SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax | Bosch Performance Line CX/625 Wh | 170/160 mm (f/r) | 22.92 kg (size L) | € 7,979 | manfacturer website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Simplon too have launched a brand-new eMTB based on the new Bosch Performance Line CX motor and also allow the new Simplon Rapcon Pmax to be configured. The bike comes either with 150 mm travel front and rear, or with a 170 mm RockShox Lyrik Ultimate fork and a slightly longer RockShox Super Deluxe shock providing 160 mm travel at the rear, as on our € 7,979 test bike. The internal 625 Wh battery can be expanded with Bosch’s external 500 Wh PowerPack battery, which gets attached to the clever bottle cage mount and will set you back an additional € 1,000. The carbon frame is full of more smart details like the cables that are all bundled together and routed into the frame through the headset, making for a very tidy looking and rattle-free bike. We would have liked the same attention to detail with the speed sensor. Here, Simplon still rely on an exposed sensor on the chainstay combined with a spoke magnet. Despite the almost indestructible but as a result heavy Schwalbe Eddy Current tires on the high-quality DT Swiss HX1501 wheelset, our configuration of the Simplon Rapcon Pmax tops the scales at only 22.92 kg. Components, weight and technical details of the SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax Super cleanAll cables are routed through the headset into the frame: very nice, rattle free and tidy. Grip monsterThe 2.8″ wide Schwalbe Eddy Current tire is so sturdy that you can run the tire pressure extremely low. On the climbs, you’ll benefit from the extra grip. FunctionalThe Bosch Purion display is a bit clunky and looks outdated but it’s comfortable to operate and provides all the ride data you need. SIMPLON Rapcon P MAX€ 7,979SpecificationsMotor Bosch Performance Line CX 75NmBattery Bosch PowerTube 625WhDisplay Bosch PurionFork RockShox Lyrik Ultimate 170 mmRear Shock RockShox SuperDeluxe Select+ 160 mmSeatpost Kind Shock LEV INTEGRA 150 mmBrakes MAGURA MT7 200/200 mmDrivetrain SRAM GX Eagle 1x12Stem ACROS Gothic 40 mmHandlebar Tune Wunderbar 780 mmWheelset DT Swiss HX1501 29"/27.5"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 22.92 kgPerm. total weight 140 kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) 117 kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount noSpecific FeaturesAusstattung konfigurierbarBosch DualBattery optionoptional headlight Hard to reachThe RockShox shock’s lockout lever is hard to reach and can only be engaged while stationary. The Simplon pedals efficiently though, so we didn’t have to use it even on long transfers. WarningSimplon continue to rely on Bosch’s spoke magnet speed sensor. It can easily twist or get lost on the trail. All electronicIn future, the Rapcon Pmax can also be ordered with FOX’s electronic Live-Valve suspension. The frame has been designed with this in mind. HugeWith the optional dual-battery system, the total battery capacity is huge and makes the Rapcon Pmax hugely versatile for everything from Alpine epics to the bike park! Geometry and size of the SIMPLON One of the priorities in developing the Rapcon Pmax was giving the rider as much freedom of movement as possible. To do so, the seat tube has been kept deliberately short and the top tube low. If the 465 mm reach (size L) is too compact for your liking, you can go up one size up without issue. Size S M L XL Seat tube 390 mm 420 mm 450 mm 480 mm Top Tube 572 mm 594 mm 627 mm 660 mm Head tube 90 mm 95 mm 110 mm 125 mm Head angle 65.1° 65.1° 65.1° 65.1° Seat angle 75.1° 75.1° 75.1° 75.1° Chainstays 458 mm 458 mm 458 mm 458 mm BB Drop 23 mm 23 mm 23 mm 23 mm Wheelbase 1,198 mm 1,220 mm 1,257 mm 1,293 mm Reach 411 mm 431 mm 461 mm 491 mm Stack 610 mm 615 mm 628 mm 643 mm Helmet POC Tectal | Backpack Amplifi E-Track | Jersey POC Raceday DH Jersey | Shorts POC Essential Enduro Shorts | Knee pads POC VPD Air googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax on the trail Once aboard the Simplon Rapcon Pmax you’ll be reluctant to get off anytime soon. The pedalling position is very comfortable on flat terrain and perfectly suited to long days in the saddle. The Simplon is one of the few bikes in the test field on which the additional battery makes sense for long rides or Alpine epics. If you’re riding without the extra battery and like taking on technically demanding terrain, we recommend pushing the saddle forward. The seat tube angle is a bit too slack for steep climbs, positioning you too far back. However, that’s compensated by the extremely grippy Schwalbe Eddy Current tire on the rear, which, in combination with the sensitive suspension, provides seemingly endless amounts of traction, even while standing! Travel, wheel size, suspension, headlights…: you can customise the Rapcon Pmax in the online configurator to suit your needs, no matter if it’s to ride bike parks, Alpine epics or for commuting On the descents, the Simplon Rapcon Pmax leaves you feeling integrated with the bike thanks to its low bottom bracket. The geometry strikes a middle ground between between extremely long and compact and thanks to the low top tube, smaller 27.5″ wheel on the rear and short seat tube it ensures freedom of movement while riding. Together with the powerful MAGURA MT7 brakes and the super-grippy Eddy Current tires, the Rapcon Pmax offers precision and composure in every situation, instilling you with confidence without feeling cumbersome or boring. On damp, soft forest soil, the grip offered by Eddy Current tire up front isn’t quite as reliable as in the dry. The suspension willingly absorbs bumps and effectively uses the available travel without bottoming out harshly and also provides enough support to get airborne or pump through rollers. The Rapcon Pmax feels more comfortable in fast, open corners than in very tight, winding sections. Although it manages to combine agility and composure in one package, it’s one of the more settled bikes on test and performs particularly well at higher speeds. Tuning tip: slide the saddle forward for steep climbs | Magic Mary tire up front for soft forest loam Riding Characteristics 7AgilitysluggishplayfulStabilitynervousstableHandlingdemandingbalancedRiding funboringlivelyMotor feelingdigitalnaturalMotor powerweakstrongValue for moneypoortopApplicationForest road 1Flow trail uphill 2Flow trail downhill 3Technical single trail uphill 4Technical single trail downhill 5Downhill tracks 6 Conclusion The Simplon Rapcon Pmax is a beautiful and sophisticated eMTB for every application from Alpine epics to the bike park. In addition to long-distance comfort, it’s capable of taking on any descent at speed. The sophisticated frame details, the customisable configuration, the cleverly solved dual battery system and the classy look all speak for the Simplon Rapcon Pmax. A bike for every man and woman which, apart from the lack of integration of the speed sensor, has no real weaknesses. Topscustomisable configurationextremely versatilegreat cable management & tidy cockpitFlopsspeed sensor with spoke magnetlockout lever on the shock is difficult to reach You can find out more about the SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax at simplon.com. The test field You can find everything you need to know about our test for the best eMTB of 2020 right here! All bikes in test: BULLS SONIC EVO AM 6 | Cannondale Moterra 1 | Canyon Spectral:ON 9.0 | COMMENCAL META POWER 29 TEAM 2020 | CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon | CUBE Stereo Hybrid 160 HPC | FANTIC XF1 180 Race | FOCUS JAM² 9.9 DRIFTER | Giant Reign E+ 0 Pro | Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 | Liteville 301 CE MK1 | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 10K | Moustache Samedi 27 Trail | Norco Range VLT C1 | NOX Hybrid Enduro 7.1 | Orbea WILD FS M-LTD | Pivot Shuttle 29 | Rocky Mountain Altitude Powerplay Carbon 90 Rally Edition | ROTWILD R.X750 ULTRA | SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax | Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert | Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo | Trek Rail 9.9 | Whyte E-180 RS V1 | YT DECOY CF Pro Race Relaxed and comfortable riding on surfaced roads, both uphill and downhill.↩Easy climbs up trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate incline.↩Active and playful descents on easy trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate slope.↩Single-track climbs on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and occasionally extreme inclines.↩Singletrack descents on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and small jumps as well as some very steep descents.↩High speed descents on sometimes very rough trails with large jumps and obstacles that you can’t roll over.↩The rating used for riding characteristics refers to the bikes in the group test and the current state of development of eMTBs. The best bikes managed to blend supposedly opposite riding characteristics, feeling both lively and stable at the same time. The handling describes the balance of the bike on downhill sections. The information regarding motor-power refers to the ride-feeling in the overall context of the bike and not exclusively to the motor – that’s why the same motor can present different values.↩Der Beitrag SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax in Review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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0 - 12/12/2019 15:17:14

Oversized tubes, sexy details and the most powerful motor on the market: the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 cuts an imposing figure, but it’s also the heaviest bike on test. We’ve checked how far off the beaten track its off-road capabilities can take us. Click here for an overview of the best eMTB 2020 group test. Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 | FLYON HPR120S/630 Wh | 180/180 mm (f/r) | 27.91 kg (size L)€ 8,999 | manufacturer website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Wow, look at it: the massive Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 is coherently styled from top to bottom. Everything, from the carbon frame of the 180 mm travel bike with its integrated tail lights to the huge display and remote, the high beam headlight and the distinctive chainring is designed in-house. The centrepiece is of course the powerful Flyon HPR 120 S motor from TQ which offers a huge 120 Nm torque. Of course, that much power consumes a lot of electricity. The battery integrated into the top tube offers a capacity of only 630 Wh but it can be recharged to 80% capacity in an hour with the optional, though rather expensive Speed Charger. However, we’d still recommend you continuously adjust the support mode to suit the terrain and use the economical Eco-Plus mode to ensure you have sufficient range. In the highest support mode, the bike will quickly drain its battery. Components, weight and technical details of the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 Weighing in at 27.96 kg, the € 8,999 Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 is by far the heaviest bike in the test field, despite the relatively light configuration with 200 mm rotors and the lighter Apex casing on the Schwalbe tires. The motor’s brute power is transmitted to the 27.5″ rear wheel via SRAM’s EX1 8-speed drivetrain. Haibike use their own aluminium components for the cockpit. However, they could have paid a little more attention to detail here as the remotes of the dropper post and the motor get in each other’s way. Loud & powerfulTQ’s Flyon HPR120S motor is by far the most powerful motor we’ve ever experienced on an eMTB. However, it hums and vibrates loudly on the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0. Only 8 gearsWe have often criticised the SRAM EX1 8-speed drivetrain because of the big steps between the gears. Thanks to the powerful motor, it performs great on the Haibike Flyon. FingerspitzengefühlEgal, wie man den Remote-Hebel der Sattelstütze auch dreht, wendet oder verschiebt – beim Betätigen kommt man unweigerlich an die Einstellung der Unterstützungsstufe, die schon auf geringen Druck sehr sensibel reagiert. Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0€ 8,999SpecificationsMotor FLYON HPR120S 120NmBattery Flyon The Battery 630WhDisplay Flyon The DisplayFork FOX 36 GRIP2 Factory 180 mmRear Shock FOX FLOAT X2 Factory 180 mmSeatpost Kind Shock LEV INTEGRA 150 mmBrakes MAGURA MT7 200/200 mmDrivetrain SRAM EX1 1x8Stem Haibike Components TheStem 2 50 mmHandlebar Haibike Components TheBar +++ 780 mmWheelset DT Swiss FR1950 27.5"Technical DataSize XS S M L XLWeight 27.96 kgPerm. total weight 120 kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) 92 kgTrailer approval yesKickstand mount yesSpecific FeaturesSkybeamer 5000 headlightrear light integrated in frame DashboardThe remote and display have been specially developed for the Flyon series. The huge display offers tons of data and settings. Lighting up the darkThe high beam of the Haibike Skybeamer is extremely bright, putting out 5000 lumens. For maximum visibility, Haibike have also integrated taillights into the seat stays. LimitedThanks to the special hitch, you can even pull small trailers with the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0. The only drawback is that in reality, the trailer will often exceed the total weight limit of the bike. High techThe speed sensor on the Haibike takes measurements 18 times per wheel revolution, determining the speed much faster and more accurately than the competition which measure only once per revolution. Geometry and size of the Haibike The oversized tubes of the Haibike with the distinctive bend in the top tube instil you with confidence based on looks alone. The front looks very tall just standing there. However, once you take a seat, it doesn’t feel tall at all. With its high bottom bracket, the 612 mm stack height is correspondingly low. Size S M L XL Seat tube 420 mm 440 mm 460 mm 480 mm Top tube 570 mm 600 mm 630 mm 660 mm Head tube 110 mm 110 mm 130 mm 130 mm Head angle 64.0° 64.0° 64.0° 64.0° Seat angle 75.1° 75.1° 75.1° 75.1° Chainstays 470 mm 470 mm 470 mm 470 mm BB Drop 5 mm 5 mm 5 mm 5 mm Wheelbase 1,226 mm 1,256 mm 1,290 mm 1,320 mm Reach 412 mm 442 mm 467 mm 497 mm Stack 594 mm 594 mm 612 mm 612 mm Helmet POC Tectal | Backpack Fox Utility Hydration Pack | Shirt POC Essential Enduro Jersey | Shorts POC Essential Enduro | Shoes ION Rascal Select googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 on the trail Climbing on forest service roads and more moderate terrain, the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 is unbeatable. The motor hums loudly and easily reaches the 25 km/h assistance threshold within seconds on almost every incline. Haibike have implemented a traction control system to prevent spinouts: the speed sensor monitors the rear wheel and reduces the power as soon as the wheel loses traction. One disadvantage is that wheelies become almost impossible because the system also interprets these as wheel spins. Thanks to the low cockpit, the front wheel always sticks to the ground and together with the powerful motor you’ll have more than enough momentum to get up technical climbs with ease. However, you’ll have to navigate carefully as the housing of the motor is quite low and tends to get hung up on obstacles. When you’re not riding it, the weight of the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 makes it difficult to manoeuvre or push around and once you stop, it requires some experience to get the bike going again on technical climbs. On tight, winding trails the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 feels like a fat SUV in the back alleys of an old Italian village. With 180 mm travel, the Haibike should glide over obstacles on the descents and instil you with confidence. In reality, however, the low front end pulls your weight forward on steep downhills and the weight of the bike makes it difficult to slow down or bring to a stop. In contrast to its smaller brother, the XDURO AllMtn, the Nduro is a lot more stretched, less balanced and more cumbersome. On tight trails, the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 feels like a fat SUV trying to navigate the back alleys of an old Italian village. The XDURO Nduro 10.0 feels most at home on man-made, smooth trails with berms, rollers and jumps. Similar to a motocross bike, you have to ride actively and use the bike’s momentum to your advantage when manoeuvring it. Stand mount, integrated lights and approved for trailers: The Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 is suitable for everyday use: except for its low total weight limit Tuning tip: handlebar and stem with more rise | 220 mm front rotor | adjust the dropper remote | soft, protective tape on the chainstay Riding Characteristics 7AgilitysluggishplayfulStabilitynervousstableHandlingdemandingbalancedRiding funboringlivelyMotor feelingdigitalnaturalMotor powerweakstrongValue for moneypoortopApplicationForest road 1Flow trail uphill 2Flow trail downhill 3Technical single trail uphill 4Technical single trail downhill 5Downhill tracks 6 Conclusion If you’re looking for the most powerful motor and the most stylish look, the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 is the bike for you. Its integrated lights make it very practical and you’ll have a lot of fun riding it on forest service roads and easy trails, so we’d categorise it as more of an SUV than a proper off-roader. Aggressive eMTBers will be disappointed with its performance on faster, more demanding and technical trails. Topsthe motor is easy to control despite its powereveryday practicalityintegrated lighting at the front and rearFlopslow total weight limitonly partly suitable for trail ridinglooks & ergonomics of the cockpit You can find out more about the Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 at haibike.com. The test field You can find everything you need to know about our test for the best eMTB of 2020 right here! All bikes in test: BULLS SONIC EVO AM 6 | Cannondale Moterra 1 | Canyon Spectral:ON 9.0 | COMMENCAL META POWER 29 TEAM 2020 | CONWAY XYRON 927 Carbon | CUBE Stereo Hybrid 160 HPC | FANTIC XF1 180 Race | FOCUS JAM² 9.9 DRIFTER | Giant Reign E+ 0 Pro | Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 | Liteville 301 CE MK1 | MERIDA eONE-SIXTY 10K | Moustache Samedi 27 Trail | Norco Range VLT C1 | NOX Hybrid Enduro 7.1 | Orbea WILD FS M-LTD | Pivot Shuttle 29 | Rocky Mountain Altitude Powerplay Carbon 90 Rally Edition | ROTWILD R.X750 ULTRA | SIMPLON Rapcon Pmax | Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert | Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo | Trek Rail 9.9 | Whyte E-180 RS V1 | YT DECOY CF Pro Race Relaxed and comfortable riding on surfaced roads, both uphill and downhill.↩Easy climbs up trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate incline.↩Active and playful descents on easy trails with few obstacles, wide turns and a moderate slope.↩Single-track climbs on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and occasionally extreme inclines.↩Singletrack descents on challenging terrain. Loose ground, steps, roots, tight corners and small jumps as well as some very steep descents.↩High speed descents on sometimes very rough trails with large jumps and obstacles that you can’t roll over.↩The rating used for riding characteristics refers to the bikes in the group test and the current state of development of eMTBs. The best bikes managed to blend supposedly opposite riding characteristics, feeling both lively and stable at the same time. The handling describes the balance of the bike on downhill sections. The information regarding motor-power refers to the ride-feeling in the overall context of the bike and not exclusively to the motor – that’s why the same motor can present different values.↩Der Beitrag Haibike XDURO Nduro 10.0 in Review erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine