Channels/E-Bike

This channel is dedicated to everything E-Bike. Here you will find all the latest stories related to E-Bikes, from bike and gear reviews. To How-To videos, ride reports and action from races.

Latest Articles

0pts - 4 hours ago

“Why do you ride an eMTB?” It’s a simple question, but one with an infinite number...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
8pts - 19/08/2019 20:17:28

VINTAGE ELECTRIC

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Electric Bike Action
4pts - 17/08/2019 20:34:25

E-BIKES AS A SPORT-SPECIFIC TRAINING...

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Electric Bike Action
11pts - 16/08/2019 21:01:06

KÜAT NV 2.0 RAMP

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Electric Bike Action
13pts - 16/08/2019 11:17:26

American Eagle and Bafang announced a partnership at the beginning of 2019 to work...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
30pts - 16/08/2019 07:17:26

We’ve come to the middle of the season and it’s about time to give you...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts - 14/08/2019 22:01:05

HPC FACTOR...

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Electric Bike Action
2pts - 14/08/2019 05:17:29

The new Bosch motor has spurred many manufacturers to release new models equipped ...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts - 14/08/2019 05:01:03

The new Bosch motor has spurred many manufacturers to release new models equipped ...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts - 13/08/2019 21:34:24

Giant B...

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Electric Bike Action

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0 - 4 hours ago

“Why do you ride an eMTB?” It’s a simple question, but one with an infinite number of answers. For many, eMTBs are simply about having fun, but for some, they represent the power to change lives. When we asked you, our readers, we were inspired and amazed by the unique stories you shared with us. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Those who play together, stay together “Here I am, right back at the start or so it seems. Except this isn’t the start. The start is far behind me in a haze of pacing, pain and days lost to endless nothing. But this is the start of choice. My husband and I met on a hot and hazy day in the remote Scottish mountains, a trip organised by mutual friends to do a big day on bikes. They say that “couples who play together stay together” and our relationship from day one was built on this premise. Before we met we were both wired for adventure, always out in the hills, clearing the cobwebs and feasting on the endorphins that only being outside can bring. With Chris effectively married to his bike, we launched into a romance of eat, sleep, work and adventure. However, 4 years ago this came to an abrupt end after a horrific period of viruses and glandular fever culminated in me being diagnosed with ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. In a way, after endless tests had found no explanation for my languishing condition, this diagnosis felt like a relief. But it also lay out a potentially permanent future of crippling fatigue, unexplained symptoms, limited choices and little understanding of the cause. I was now officially chronically ill, inactive and trapped in my own body. I even offered Chris a way out, as this isn’t what either of us had signed up for. Then came an eMTB. This union changed the rules. The illness couldn’t take my technical ability, a prize I got to keep, and now I had the tool to level the playing field. The first ride promised possibilities that had long been put to bed – the power to compensate for my failing body. Over the coming months, I experienced a new type of energy. The type that promotes healthy tiredness that isn’t crippling fatigue. The type that steadies the soul and clears the mind. I had the opportunity to plan adventures and get out into the world with Chris and my friends and the chance to play on even terms. Fast forward three more years and we’ve been on adventures big and small, slowly pushing the limits of my body and the machine. This is a new start, with the help of the eMTB, friends, family and my husband I now have a choice. This is the new starting point, a point where I can choose my own path and loosen the grip of this illness on my life.” [Aileen Herragthy, 33] The Off-Road Commuter “Escaping the confines of my stuffy car and the world’s biggest carpark – the infamous M25 motorway – and tackling my 13-mile off-road commute atop a Spectral:ON is the best start or end to any workday. It’s a regular little escape from the petrol fumes and road rage that puts a smile on my face. You can often pedal the whole route without seeing another soul. It feels like a hidden dimension. On the other side are cigarettes hanging out of car windows, wedged along dual carriageways full of potholes and broken glass, overlaid with the near-constant sound of ambulance sirens. The only sound I can hear is the trees gently swaying in the wind, twigs being snapped beneath my tyres and the low buzz of my Shimano motor. The best thing? I don’t even have to shower once I get to the office (unless it’s been a mud-fest). I’ve been pedalling for sure but never pushing enough to lose my breath – even on the 25% gradients up to the edge of Reigate Hill. That’s what Boost mode is for after all! Riding on the road takes about the same amount of time but is far from a pleasant experience. I’ve been threatened and sworn at by drivers multiple times and had a few very close encounters with wing mirrors and car doors. I’m often a bag of nerves by the end of it. The off-road ride, in contrast, is great fun. The Spectral:ON has been a real game-changer and has opened up another far more enjoyable commute.“ [Hollie Weatherstone, 30] The Life Changer “Just over five years ago I was involved in a rear-end vehicle collision which left me with severe lower back injuries. To cut a long and very painful story short, even after 5 operations and many years of rehab I was only able to regain 80% of the function I had before the accident. After 6 months of being ‘nearly’ normal and knowing that I needed exercise, I celebrated by buying a hardtail mountain bike. I had so much fun riding my local trails but I couldn’t climb a hill for toffee. Every time it got even a little bit steep my back would tense up and I’d be in pain, spoiling my rides. Fast forward 9 months and I was lucky enough to be able to order an eMTB. I went for the 2019 Vitus E-Sommet VRS and what a game changer. Honestly, I went out for my first ride and headed straight for the hill that had defeated me on my hardtail, put it in Eco and thought let’s see how this goes. I wouldn’t say I breezed up, but I managed to climb the hill and was amazed – I was grinning like a kid with a new toy. I did 20km that day and I enjoyed every meter of it. As the ride went on, I tried Trail and then Boost and it just blew me away. I actually had to stop at the top of a hill I had ridden and laugh, and then when I realised what I was now doing I became emotional. I had just climbed a significant hill when a year previously I couldn’t climb the stairs. I am now riding twice, sometimes three times a week and nothing stops me. I’ve been out with mates who ribbed me saying I am bringing my motorbike, but I let them have a go and they are all smiles. For me my EMTB is not just a game changer, it’s a life changer.” [Mark Wells, 44 ] The Reformed Technophobe “I must confess to being a bit of a luddite, a technophobe. I drive an old diesel van, heat my house with a wood burning stove and use my phone to actually call people. So eMTBs did not come easy to me. As a life-long biker who has just turned 40, I have come to the understanding that continuing to struggle up hills without a motor is very good for me, keeping my trousers loose and my fitness up. As such, I’m not ready to hang up my un-motorised bike quite yet. However, that’s not to say that I cannot have some fun every now and again, and after experiencing that eMTB smile, I’m now all in. After taking an amazing jump into the world of fatherhood, a new eMTB inevitably arrived in my bike stable. Now everything has changed. Even though I thought I knew every trail in my area, the addition of an eMTB to my bike shed has opened my eyes to a huge network of discovery. Trails that were previously too far away, trails that needed too much climbing to get to, trails that were hard to link into a normal ride. All these trails are now my frequent ‘stolen hours’ playground, for now, riding on my own means stealing ‘father time’ from my new son. I keep fit and healthy now for him, so one day we can ride together. An eMTB lets me keep young, and gives me more precious time with my boy. I would say that I have discovered more in one year on my eMTB than I discovered in the last 10 years without the extended range and climbing capacity of the motor. Yes, sometimes it’s good for the soul to struggle unaided up the hills, but equally, sometimes it just good to throw on a helmet, turn on the motor and grin all the way to the horizon.” [Kevin Wordly, 40] Why do you ride your eMTB? Do you have an inspiring journey you would like to share? Reach out to us, we would love to hear your story: hello@ebike-mtb.com Der Beitrag Why I ride an eMTB erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
8 - 19/08/2019 20:17:28

VINTAGE ELECTRIC Vintage Electric was started by Andrew Davidge in the early 2010s. Like many great things, the company started in his parents’ garage. Andrew took a few of the early bikes to a prestigious vintage car show in Monterey, California, and that weekend, he segued the Vintage Electric vision into a business. Those first bikes were proof of concept that a vintage-inspired, battery-assisted pedal bike should be a thing and that other people shared the team’s vision. Their vintage motorcycle look immediately caught on, and we took notice. The bikes are truly stunning, and every time we have a chance to ride one, we jump! TECH BEGINNINGS The business is based in Santa Clara, California, right in Silicon Valley, which provides the perfect backdrop for a high-tech, cutting-edge product with a beautiful, old-school look. Originally, the bikes were made in the U.S., but up until recently, as demand has increased, they found that this wasn’t economically feasible. Manufacturing has now been moved to Taiwan, which is now scalable. Another thing has changed. Whereas the battery cases, purposely made to look like a V-twin motor, had been sand-cast aluminum, they’ve switched to a die-cast process, which allows thinner cases that make them lighter and dissipate heat much better—actually, about 40-percent better. They moved the MOSFETs for the controller higher inside the case to take advantage of the improved cooling. Classic chrome rat-trap pedals are a nice detail on the bikes.   Speaking of aluminum, since some of the frames are aluminum, they’ve added stainless steel inserts in the rear dropouts to be able to handle all the torque from their powerful motors, reducing wear and tear on the frame. Also new are the torque sensors in the bottom bracket on all the bikes. Previously, they were throttle-powered only. The Crystalyte direct-drive rear hub motors offer tremendous power. On the Tracker and Scrambler models, they can offer up to 3000 watts, but that requires a special race key and is for private land use only. Without the key, all of the bikes are 750 watts and cut off at 20 mph. We had an exclusive chance to ride all three bikes, and to say that the Tracker and Scrambler S with the race key are thrilling is an understatement. We had ear-to-ear smiles the whole time. Simply, the power was intoxicating! We were told that Bluetooth connectivity is coming soon with the ability to monitor system performance, including aiding Vintage Electric to remotely connect, diagnose, then send out the correct personnel to fix any problems. THE CAFE The Cafe is priced at $3995, and is available in either Skyline Bronze or Golden Gate Red. It’s the smallest and lightest of the three bikes. The battery is smaller and removable to take inside for easy charging, and charges fully in only two hours. It offers pedal assist using a torque sensor at the bottom bracket, or a thumb throttle on the bars. Its 1×10 system isn’t a huge range of gears, but it’s plenty with the power. A powerful, compact 6-volt LED Supernova headlight and integrated taillight provide ample lighting, even for night rides. This is the one bike that stays street-legal, limiting the motor to 750 watts. No regeneration is available on the Cafe. THE TRACKER The Tracker sits in the middle of the line at $4995. It has a single-speed setup for simplicity, as most riders will use the pedal-assist or throttle more than gearing, and it keeps the look cleaner. Without the race key, this is a stylish Class 2 bike, as it cuts off at 20 mph. Insert the race key and it’s a different story. It’s an absolutely thrilling ride, maxing out at 36 mph. We had a blast taking this on some roads we had all to ourselves! Vintage uses powerful Crystalyte motors, up to 3000 watts each, and all are direct drive to allow for regenerative braking.   The Tracker also gets a new Graphite Blue color option. It is gorgeous and matches a Porsche color, and Davidge says there’s a direct correlation between Vintage Electric bikes and Porsche ownership. A larger battery offers longer range, up to 50 miles depending on use, but only bumps the charge time by a half hour to 2.5 hours. The battery isn’t readily removable like the Cafe’s. THE SCRAMBLER S This is the brand’s new big daddy. With a satin black finish, a rally-esque yellow LED motorcycle-style headlamp with a steel mesh protector, this is the bad boy your mother warned you about. It looks mean just sitting there. An inverted fork with 60mm of travel enhances the motorcycle look. Again, this has pedal assist and a throttle, as well as regenerative braking that actually slows the bike nicely going downhill or just in reducing the amount of braking you have to do to bring this 86-pound juggernaut to a stop. Like the Tracker, there’s only one gear, and this bike doesn’t seem to need more than that. If you like pedaling, you might tweak the gearing, as we ran out of gears fairly often on the Scrambler S. “We had ear-to-ear smiles the whole time, and the power was intoxicating!” It also offers the optional race key to bump it from a Class 2 bike on road to a 36-mph thrill ride for private land. Schwalbe Black Jack knobbies let you take it on unpaved roads, too. We just felt like Peter Fonda riding around on it! The largest battery of the trio, it offers 45–75 miles of range and a 4.5-hour recharge time. That’s on par with most batteries on the market for charge time, but few come near the capacity. The price makes sense with the big battery, style and performance, coming in at $6995. Founder Andrew Davidge opens the taps on the Tracker. UPGRADES For a current Vintage Electric owner, the company offers upgrades to their new die-cast battery packs with all-new controllers, etc., essentially future-proofing their bikes. No need to buy a new bike to get the latest technology. We definitely think that is a great way to show loyalty to owners. They’ve partnered with Velofix to work with them on the upgrades at the consumers’ homes. We won’t call these bikes pure style, because that would sell them short. They are beautiful, but they also perform extremely well and have excellent build quality. From style to substance, the Vintage bikes check all the boxes and at a price that seems positively affordable for what you’re getting. SPECS VINTAGE ELECTRIC CAFE Price: $3995 Motor: Crystalyte 750W direct-drive rear hub Battery: 48V 10.4 Ah Charge time: 2 hours Top speed: 28 mph (with assist) Range: 20–50 miles Drive: Shimano SLX, 10-speed Brakes: Shimano M365 hydraulic disc brakes Controls: Vintage Electric Fork: Aluminum Frame: Chromoly Tires: Schwalbe Fat Frank, 29×2.0”, Kevlar guard Color choices: Skyline Bronze or Golden Gate Red Sizes: S/M/L VINTAGE ELECTRIC TRACKER Price: $4995 Motor: Crystalyte 750W (3000W in Race Mode) direct drive rear hub Battery: 48V, 15 Ah Charge time: 2.5 hours Top Speed: 36 mph Range: 25–50 miles Drive: FSA/KMC Brakes: Promax Lucid hydraulic disc brakes Controls: Vintage Electric Fork: Chromoly Frame: Hydroformed aluminum Tires: Schwalbe Fat Frank, 26×2.35”, Kevlar guard Color choices: Red or Graphite Blue Weight: 79 lb. Sizes: One size VINTAGE ELECTRIC SCRAMBLER S Price: $6995 Motor: Crystalyte 750W (3000W in Race Mode) direct-drive rear hub Battery: 48V, 23.4 Ah Charge time: 4.5 hours Top speed: 36 mph Range: 40-75 miles Drive: FSA/KMC Brakes: Promax Lucid hydraulic disc brakes Controls: Vintage Electric Fork: MRP inverted fork with 60mm of travel Frame: Hydroformed aluminum Tires: Schwalbe Black Jack knobby, 26×2.35” Color Choices: Satin Black Weight: 86 lb. Sizes: One size www.vintageelectricbikes.com   THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post VINTAGE ELECTRIC appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
4 - 17/08/2019 20:34:25

E-BIKES AS A SPORT-SPECIFIC TRAINING TOOL Josh Carlson is a top enduro-class racer. For the uninitiated, enduro is a mountain bike racing discipline where the downhills are timed but the ascents are not, usually doing multiple laps, and the races last for hours, making them grueling physical tests for the riders.v Carlson’s coach suggested he try an e-bike to shorten the time spent climbing so he could get in more descending time. Lucky for Josh, his bike sponsor happens to be Giant Bicycles, and they set him up on a Trance E+ as similarly as possible to his race bike, a Giant Reign. “Even before this project came to fruition, I’ve always been pro e-bike. Now that I’ve ridden one, it just brings the fun back! The whole goal of it was to get more descending time in and less effort pedaling on the climbs. The final goal was that I wanted it to replicate my race bike as much as possible. “I’ve got 160-140mm of travel, which is a little less than the 180/160mm of travel on my race bike, but the geometry of it is pretty similar. I think the extra weight of the e-bike is definitely helping my riding on my normal bike. “I’m not getting fatigued climbing back up the hill; I’m getting fatigued from doing so many downhill runs.” “My normal Reign in race setup weighs about 15 kilograms [33 pounds], with big tires, big suspension, and the 180mm travel fork and coil-over shock. This thing weighs about 10 kilos [22 pounds] more, and when I get back onto my Reign after riding this bike, it makes it feel so light and nimble. You can just slap it into turns, and it dances underneath you through rough sections. “You get to go twice as fast up climbs and twice as fast through stuff with all this extra weight. When you get back on your normal race bike, your mind is used to going that little bit quicker; you just feel like a superhero! “One of my little training zones that I train on (at home) in Wollongong, Australia, there’s about a 15–20-minute climb back up the hill. Pretty solid, like I’m using a granny gear or a couple of gears down. Usually, in like an hour and a half or two hours, I’ll do maybe six laps. That’s a pretty solid day on my Reign. On this bike, I can pretty easily bust out 8 to 10, sometimes 12 laps. I just get way more downhill time in with way less effort, so I’ll pedal back up the hill at 100 beats a minute. I’ll pretty much just roll straight in, because I’m already rested and recovered, do the exact same downhill, just as aggressive, if not harder because the bike’s heavier and it’s hard to slow down. I get to the bottom and put the power on full gas and just burn back up the hill in like seven minutes, straight back up to the top and do it again! I’m not getting fatigued climbing back up the hill; I’m getting fatigued from doing so many downhill runs. For me, that level of training is ideal. “I think e-bikes are a perfect training tool for Enduro World Series riders, and for an enduro rider, it will probably become more beneficial than a road bike. Hopefully (my competition) won’t work that out sooner rather than later! With a bit of luck I can keep that to myself a little while.” THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post E-BIKES AS A SPORT-SPECIFIC TRAINING TOOL appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
11 - 16/08/2019 21:01:06

KÜAT NV 2.0 RAMP You can see how long the NV 2.0 ramp is, and that gradual incline makes getting a 50-pound e-bike up onto the rack all but effortless.   For many of us, when it comes to transporting our e-bikes, finding a good two-bike rack that can handle the weight of an e-bike is problematic enough. Next comes the task of hefting a 50-plus-pound bike onto a rack. Not easy. For some, it’s impossible. Thankfully, the folks over at Küat have recognized the problem and have come up with a very simple solution. Their NV 2.0 steel ramp expands to nearly 6 feet and attaches via some additional hardware to their NV 2.0 ramp. THE RACK The Kuat ramp won’t do you any good if you don’t have the Küat rack it’s designed for. They sent us their NV 2.0 folding rack. It comes in a small box, very well-packed, with Ikea-like instructions. We tried to build it using only one person, but it ended up requiring two. Easy mounting in a 2-inch hitch receiver, with great controls for tightening it in so it doesn’t move around when bikes are mounted, with a locking pin that’s keyed the same as the two cable locks that mount under either bike runner. Those locks are magnetically held in, and they do tend to pop out over bumps, leaving the locks to drag on the ground. The shepherd’s hook that holds the front wheel into a very attractive tray setup (with plenty of room for drainage if you got muddy) can easily handle up to 29er wheels, and the strap on the back moves along the channel to hold the back wheel, regardless of wheelbase. The rack itself is metallic grey with orange-anodized accents. It comes with an accessory bike stand so you can work on your bike without needing to load it onto the rack. The fully expanded ramp.   You can see the channels and thumbscrews that allow the pamp to expand and contract for easy storage.   It ain’t rocket surgery! This very simple design keeps the ramp sturdy, easy to use and relatively inexpensive. THE RAMP Installing the ramp leaves you taking the end caps off the channels where the locks are and completely removing the locks and two Torx bolts (wrench included) to install a metal receiver that the ramp will hook into. This takes a few minutes each, but it’s pretty straightforward. Make sure you align that piece correctly, as there is some play to it. We found this out the hard way the first time we tried to mount the ramp; it wouldn’t fit. Loosening the bolts slightly allowed us to align it properly, and off we went. The ramp has a pair of thumbscrews that tighten into long channels, effectively letting you expand it from 32 inches to 54 inches. This makes it incredibly easy to move the weight up the inclined plane (remember this from your physics class umpteen years ago?). You might even be able to engage Walk mode if your bike has it to make it even easier. Price: $90 www.kuatonline.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com   The post Product Review: KÜAT NV 2.0 RAMP appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
13 - 16/08/2019 11:17:26

American Eagle and Bafang announced a partnership at the beginning of 2019 to work together to develop a race eMTB to compete at the UCI eMTB World Championship in Mont-Sainte-Anne, Canada. We got a first peek at the photos and key details of the development of the American Eagle ebike fitted with the new Bafang M500 motor. American Eagle prototype: carbon frame, Bafang M500 motor, 450 Wh integrated battery and a cross-country-esque low-slung cockpit. Both the 29” wheels and 150 mm travel suspension come from DT Swiss. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); American Eagle, a well-known 90s bike brand, was relaunched in November 2016 by Dutch ex-pro mountain biker Bart Brentjens. Bart won a gold medal at the Olympic Games in Atlanta in 1996 aboard an American Eagle. Since then, they have launched a number of mountain bikes and are now working on this, their first eMTB. The collaboration between Chinese motor supplier Bafang and the Dutch bike manufacturer American Eagle showed its first fruits at the Electric Snake Race during the UCI MTB World Cup Val di Sole. American Eagle engineer Kjell van de Boogert raced in Val di Sole, Italy for the CST-Sandd-Bafang Mountainbike Racing Team and took second place behind 2012 Olympic bronze medallist, Marco Fontana, riding for FOCUS. After several months of sleuthing and effort, we’ve managed to get a hold of the first exclusive photos and information about the new bike. The American Eagle eMTB is powered by a Bafang M500 mid motor drive which offers up to 95 Nm support. Unfortunately we haven’t so far had an eMTB fitted with the Bafang system available to take part in our big motor group test. The 450 Wh battery should provide enough range for the UCI eMTB World Championship race in Mont-Sainte-Anne. Bafang does also offer a 600 Wh battery available, though this would of course increase the weight of the system. The main triangle of the carbon frame provides the space for a bottle cage Cross-country focussed MAGURA MT8 Raceline brakes take care of stopping duties. That might be alright for the pros but for everyday use we would prefer to see more robust four-piston brakes. Some room for improvement: the distant motor remote and the levers for the suspension lockout and dropper post on the left of the bars are a little cluttered. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The lightweight carbon Selle Italia saddle also helps to cut down the weight The American Eagle race bike is equipped with a 12-speed SRAM XX1 Eagle drivetrain The DT Swiss F535 ONE shock controls 150 mm travel and can be locked from the bars Watch the Brentjes MTB Racing Team at the race in Val di Sole: .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Our thoughts The Bafang-equipped American Eagle is conceived as a pure-bred, lightweight race bike and as such isn’t really designed for everyday trail riding. However, we’re pleased to be able to introduce a carbon eMTB newcomer with its exciting Bafang motor and are interested to see whether this bike will make it to production. When it’s time, we’ll be sure to report on what the bike and motor can do! For more information head to americaneagle.online. Der Beitrag Spy Shot: American Eagle eMTB with the new Bafang M500 motor erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
30 - 16/08/2019 07:17:26

We’ve come to the middle of the season and it’s about time to give you an update on our long-term E-MOUNTAINBIKE test bikes. The feelings and experiences of our test riders are mixed and not just because many of them are still waiting for their bikes. Read on to find out about our honest impressions over the last few months, from the best of times to the bitter disappointment that we’re still waiting – as everyone else – for some of our bikes to arrive. Let’s get to the bad news first: both Christoph and Robin are still waiting to receive the YT DECOY and the Haibike FLYON. Even though we’re generally the first to receive new test bikes for reviews, we’ve been struggling with availability just as much as everyone else. We hope that Christoph and Robin will be able to hit the trails soon, especially as there’s not too much left of the season! Delayed, but rather late than never, Valentin has finally received his Riese & Müller Supercharger and he’s been commuting on it every day since. Felix, Sarah and Toni have been diligently racking up the miles and the patina of wear and tear showing on their bikes couldn’t be more different. Below, you’ll find out how they have tuned their bikes, which parts have needed replacement and the first impressions of their respective rides. For more information about our test team, you can read the first instalment of our long-term E-MOUNTAINBIKE test here. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Specialized Turbo Levo Expert – Felix As our hardcore tester, Felix doesn’t do anything by half measures, staying on the gas through the worst rock gardens and roughest terrain. As you might expect, his Specialized Turbo Levo has started looking a little the worse for wear. However, Felix has been riding the bike for a good six months and the strains on a mid-motor driven eMTB are immeasurably higher than on a regular mountain bike. So, after having covered 1736 km, Felix has gone through one SRAM GX cassette, two sets of rear brake pads and a chain – who could have guessed? That’s just what the 410% maximum support from the Brose Drive S Mag can do to a chain and cassette. Apart from that, the wheels have also taken quite a beating and are now so dented that they’ve started to resemble the crater-ridden moon as it wobbles around the earth. As we said, Felix loves pushing the limit And it was pretty much inevitable that he would quickly have to say goodbye to the Specialized Butcher tires: both casings were shot through on the first day. Felix replaced them with a WTB Trail Boss Tough on the rear and a WTB Vigilante High Grip up front. After an unfortunate crash on asphalt (shit happens!) he had to say goodbye to the original saddle and handlebar. He replaced the former with a Selle Italia X-LR Carbonio Superflow and the latter with a Beast Components Carbon model. In retrospect, saving weight on the saddle might not have been the best decision. It only lasted two months before one of the saddle rails broke. Since then, Felix has opted for the sturdier X-LR TM Air Superflow model without any carbon. After six months of hard use, the Specialized Command Post dropper needed some love as it had become somewhat sticky and uncooperative. However, the problem was solved within 30 min with a little grease and basic servicing skills. Felix didn’t only replace parts that wore out or broke and also added a few upgrades, such as the Supernova M99 MINI on the handlebars allowing him to ride long into the night. He also installed the Sahmurai S.W.O.R.D. tubeless repair kit in his bar ends and he put on a set of Renthal Push-On soft grips. To achieve optimal performance on the fork, Felix upgraded the RockShox Pike with a Deaneasy ABS fork tuning kit. We’ll go into the details of the kit, what it does and who it’s for in the next instalment. Total cost of broken parts approx. € 742 Specialized Alloy Low Rise Handlebar (€ 52), Specialized Phenom Comp (€ 93), 2x Specialized Butcher GRID (approx. 90 €), GX Eagle Cassette (€ 220), GX Eagle Chain (€ 32), 2 x CODE brake pads (€ 15), Selle Italia Carbonio Superflow (€ 240) Replacements Handlebar, saddle (crash), Selle Italia Carbonio Superflow (€ 240), chain, cassette, tires, 2 x rear brake pads, Roval Traverse Fattie 29 rear Service/Upgrades Renthal Push-On Soft grips, WTB Trail Boss Tough on the rear, WTB Vigilante High Grip up front, Supernova M99 MINI headlight, DeanEasy ABS fork tuning kit in the PIKE, Sahmurai S.W.O.R.D. Kilometres 1736 km Duration 6 months Review Specialized Turbo Levo Expert review Canyon Spectral:ON 7.0 WMN – Sarah Compared to Felix’s Specialized, Sarah’s Canyon Spectral:ON is doing a lot better. While Sarah rides her eMTB much more gently, she certainly hasn’t been riding less! Thanks to her regular commute and after-work rides, Sarah is scratching at the 1,000 km mark after only 3 months. Considering that, the bike is in surprisingly good nick. To be honest, it’s still in perfect condition! Take it out of the box, put it together and ride off: it doesn’t take much more than that when you buy a bike from Canyon. The bike arrives in its box almost completely pre-assembled – all you have to do is attach the bars, install the battery and wheels, set up the bike and go. We’re keen to see how Sarah carries on and we hope that her Spectral:ON remains as trouble-free as it has been so far. Replacements – Service/Upgrades – Kilometres 920 km Duration 3 months Review Canyon Spectral:ON 7.0 review googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Riese & Müller Supercharger Rohloff HS – Valentin Valentin has been able to ride his bike for about two and a half weeks now, but he’s really been going at it. The Riese & Müller – with its panniers on the side – has literally taken a big load off his shoulders, and thanks to the motor supporting him up to 45 km/h, it also makes his daily commute that much quicker, saving him valuable time. But, here’s the problem: before you consider buying yourself an S-Pedelec, first check the route that you would take to work. Legally speaking, S-Pedelecs are regarded as two-wheeled motor vehicles, which means you’re not allowed to ride them on bike paths, forest service roads or the like. This can become a problem if you haven’t got the right infrastructure. Valentin faced quite a challenge figuring out a route to commute from Stuttgart – Germany’s car city – to our offices in Leonberg. Just as important as it is not to race an S-Pedelec through your local woods, you also have to have insurance. If you’re riding an S-Pedelec without insurance or a registration plate, you’re not only risking lifelong indebtedness due to a lack of coverage in case of an accident, you’re also riding illegally. Once you’ve dealt with all of that, commuting is an absolute breeze. Thanks to the generous 1,000 Wh battery feeding the Bosch Performance motor, you can cover long distances without having to worry about charging points. However, the range is heavily dependent on the support level, your route and your riding style. Unlike regular pedelecs which only support you up to 25 km/h, the motor of an S-Pedelec is always working, which inevitably comes at the expense of battery life. The electronic Rohloff drivetrain takes some getting used to, but it’s worth its weight in gold for daily commuting, seeing as it’s pretty much maintenance-free. The Rohloff also allows you to change gears while standing still, which is a great feature when you’re in the city and have to start up a slope. The fact that it automatically shifts down at traffic lights or for short stops is just as helpful. However, you will have to get used to the rather sluggish shifting and that you can’t change gears under load. You shouldn’t really be doing this anyway, but here planning your shifting ahead of time is vital. The only point of criticism for Valentin is the MAGURA MT4 brakes. Besides not being powerful enough to reliably bring the 30 kg bike to a standstill, the rotors have discoloured after only two weeks of use. He’ll probably have to upgrade these soon. Replacements – Service/Upgrades – Kilometres 500 km Duration 2 ½ weeks LIV Intrigue E+ 1 Pro – Toni So far, Toni’s LIV Intrigue E+ 1 Pro has been working like a dream. Defects or problems? Zero! The bike just keeps soldiering on, regardless of whether it’s her commute to teach at school or her after-work rides. The only thing Toni has had to do was bleed the brakes after they started feeling a little spongy. Over the last few weeks, the LIV has not only managed to convince our test rider, but also a bunch of her friends who have repeatedly hijacked the bike for a test ride. Toni’s highlight: a week of island hopping in Greece, riding the LIV Intrigue across the islands in the day and crossing between them by boat in the evenings. The only annoying thing here was having to carry the special adapter needed to charge the battery off the bike. Her holiday would have been ruined if she hadn’t thought of it at the last minute and searched the house in a panic. Over the next few weeks, she’ll have to replace the chain, the brake pads and the rear tire – ordinary wear and tear that you should check regularly on an eMTB. The total costs will come to around € 120, not counting labour, since Toni will be doing it herself. Replacements – Service/Upgrades Bleeding the brakes after two months Kilometres 1200 km Duration 7 months In-depth review LIV Intrigue E+ 1 Pro review This article is from E-MOUNTAINBIKE issue #018E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free! Der Beitrag The First Long-term eMTB Test Update erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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2 - 14/08/2019 22:01:05

HPC FACTORY RACE BIKES Hi-Power Cycles is always coming up with new designs. They are now announcing the HPC Scout Factory Edition, taking the Scout platform to the next level. This limited-edition bike, designed and spec’d for their factory racing team, features a custom hand-painted frame, hubs, motor cover and battery, a DVO Diamond 29 Boost fork, a full Box Two-E drivetrain, including the Two-E 9s 11-50T 1×9 cassette. It also has Magura MT Trail Carbon brakes with big rotors, and Maxxis High Roller II 29×2.3-inch tires with Mynesweeper inserts. As with all HPC bikes, this thing is overbuilt to be able to handle the rigors of competition use. Look for HPC’s factory racing team to hit a race near you this season. You can follow them on Instagram @hpcfactoryracing. www.hi-powercycles.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post HPC Factory Race Bikes appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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