Channels/E-Bike

This channel is dedicated to everything E-Bike. Here you will find all the latest stories related to E-Bikes, from bike and gear reviews. To How-To videos, ride reports and action from races.

Latest Articles

8pts - 20/01/2021 18:34:13

Probably not the choice to take on an EWS stage, but if you throw in the occasion...

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Pinkbike
28pts - 19/01/2021 17:51:15

Bianchi’s new ...

Posted by
Bike Radar
22pts - 19/01/2021 17:51:15

With their new E-Omnia series 2021, Bianchi are presenting a number of innovative ...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
14pts - 19/01/2021 14:34:15

Which are the most stand out bike products of 2021? What are the most important tr...

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
22pts - 16/01/2021 14:17:15

Defining whether eMTBs are legally mountain bikes or motorcycles may have implica...

Posted by
Pinkbike
16pts - 15/01/2021 10:51:14

Innes Graham and Max Rendall hit the trails on the Radon Render.( Photos: 3...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 15/01/2021 08:34:14

We headed to Southwest Germany’s Palatinate region to chat with the MTB marathon l...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
8pts - 11/01/2021 20:17:13

The Wire Peak gets component updates along with a Shimano EP8 motor option for 20...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2pts - 08/01/2021 08:34:14

So you want to buy yourself an eMTB for € 4,000? Should you go for the high-end ha...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts - 05/01/2021 23:34:15

There are 16 configurations available for the e:dr...

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Mountain Bike Action

Latest Photos

8 - 20/01/2021 18:34:13

Probably not the choice to take on an EWS stage, but if you throw in the occasional set of stairs on your work commute or have ever fancied ABS on a bike, your ride awaits.( Photos: 4, Comments: 2 )

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Pinkbike
28 - 19/01/2021 17:51:15

Bianchi’s new E-Omnia electric bike range has been designed for different types of rider; with city load luggers, touring-oriented bikes and mountain bikes, including a full suspension model and a hardtail. Five different alloy frame configurations are available but all are powered by the same Bosch Performance Line CX motor with a hefty 85Nm of torque, support levels of up to 340 per cent of the rider’s input and two integrated battery options: 500Wh and 625Wh. Some models are also available with anti-lock braking. All the Bianchi E-Omnia models integrate Bosch’s display unit into the stem. Bianchi has looked to up rider visibility with integrated 40 Lux front and rear lights, which are said to be visible at 500 metres, illuminate the road up to 100m ahead of the rider and give side-on visibility. As well as the two standard and five ‘signature’ paint options, you can use Bianchi’s 3D configurator to choose from 8,500 possible custom colour and equipment configurations. Bianchi E-Omnia City range The Bianchi E-Omnia C Type is designed for city riders, with a range of clip-on accessories. Two of the E-Omnia’s five model range are designed for city riding: the C Type and T Type. The C Type has a step-through frame and an upright seating position, and there’s a choice of 10-speed Shimano Deore or belt-drive 5-speed Shimano Nexus hub gear drivetrains. The bike features an integrated rear carrier for load-lugging that’s welded to the seatstays, which also houses the integrated rear light. There’s a range of panniers and a child carrier available to match, too. City essentials such as a kickstand, mudguards and a chainguard come as standard. Bianchi says that riders can expect a range of up to 110km from the large 625Wh battery. All the E-Omnia bikes are powered by the Bosch Performance Line CX motor with 85Nm torque. The T Type includes women’s and men’s frame options and is designed with commuting, fitness and pleasure riding in mind, according to Bianchi. The bike has a front suspension fork with 120mm travel, a range of up to 195km and an option for ABS braking. Drivetrain choices are the same as the C Type – Shimano Deore or a Gates belt drive option. Bianchi E-Omnia C Type Deore 10-speed spec Frame: E-Omnia C Type alloy Fork: SR Suntour XCM34 Boost NLO DS, 100mm travel Motor: Bosch Performance Line CX 85Nm torque Battery: Bosch 625Wh Drivetrain: FSA Metropolis cranks, Shimano Deore M4100 rear mech, 38t x 11-42t Brakes: Shimano MT200 Wheels: Velomann eBike Kargo on Shimano MT400/Formula Cl-1422 hubs Tyres: WTB Slick 29 x 2.2in Bianchi E-Omnia T Type Nexus 5-speed spec Frame: E-Omnia T Type alloy (men’s or women’s) Fork: RockShox Recon Silver RL, 120mm travel Motor: Bosch Performance Line CX 85Nm torque Battery: Bosch 625Wh Drivetrain: FSA cranks, Gates belt drive, Shimano Nexus 5-speed hub gear Brakes: Shimano MT410 Wheels: Velomann eBike Kargo on Shimano hubs Tyres: Schwalbe Supermoto 29 x 2.4in Bianchi E-Omnia touring range All the ebikes feature in-built lighting. For touring and use on- and off-road, Bianchi recommends the FT Type. It’s features full suspension, with 120mm front and 100mm rear travel, and like the C Type has an integrated rear rack and mudguards. There’s a front wheel ABS option and claimed range is up to 195km with the range extender battery. Go-anywhere credentials are increased with either a Shimano XT 1×12-speed or Deore 1×11-speed drivetrain, and Schwalbe Hurricane tyres. Bianchi E-Omnia FT Type 1×12-speed spec Frame: E-Omnia FT Type FS alloy Fork: RockShox Recon Silver RL 29B Solo Ai, 120mm travel Shock: RockShox Deluxe Select+ RL, 100mm travel Motor: Bosch Performance Line CX 85Nm torque Battery: Bosch 625Wh Drivetrain: FSA cranks, Shimano XT M8100 rear mech, Deore M6100 shifters, 34t x 10-51t Brakes: Shimano MT520 Wheels: Velomann ST30 TCS 2.0 on Formula CL-811/510B hubs Tyres: Schwalbe Hurricane 29 x 2.25in Bianchi Omnia-E MTB range Bianchi says that the FX Type is a high-performance full suspension mountain bike. Finally, mountain bike options are the FX Type and the X Type. The FX Type is the higher-spec full-suspension 29er model that Bianchi says is designed for expert riders. Two specs are available for the FX Type. The higher option includes a Fox Float Rhythm 160mm fork and Fox Float DPS Performance 150mm rear shock. Drivetrain options are Shimano XT or SRAM GX Eagle, and there’s also an option for ABS braking. Like the other models in the E-Omnia range, the bike has integrated lights and a Bosch Performance Line CX motor, but it drops the rear rack. Bianchi quotes a range of up to 142km. The X Type is a hardtail 29er ebike and comes with 120mm of front travel from a RockShox Recon fork. Again, ABS and a belt drive are options. Bianchi E-Omnia FX Type 12-speed spec Frame: E-Omnia FX Type FS alloy Fork: Fox Float 36 Rhythm, 160mm travel Shock: Fox Float DPS Performance, 150mm travel Motor: Bosch Performance Line CX 85Nm torque Battery: Bosch 625Wh Drivetrain: FSA cranks, Shimano XT M8100 rear mech, Deore M6100 shifters, 34t x 10-51t Brakes: Shimano MT520 Wheels: Velomann ST 30 TCS 2.0 on Formula CL-811/510B hubs Tyres: Kenda Hellkat 29 x 2.6in Bianchi E-Omnia X Type SX Eagle spec Frame: E-Omnia X Type HT alloy Fork: RockShox Recon Silver RL, 120mm travel Motor: Bosch Performance Line CX 85Nm torque Battery: Bosch 625Wh Drivetrain: SRAM SX Eagle 12-speed, 34t x 11-50t Brakes: Shimano MT4100 Wheels: Velomann ST 30 TCS 2.0 on Shimano MT400 hubs Tyres: Kenda Booster 29 x 2.6in

Posted by
Bike Radar
22 - 19/01/2021 17:51:15

With their new E-Omnia series 2021, Bianchi are presenting a number of innovative eBikes which are meant to bridge the city-, tour- and mountain-bike sectors. While all models rely on a Bosch motor, all other components can be selected from Bianchi’s new 3D configurator – with a total of 8,500 different options! Bianchi’s new eBikes clearly stand out from the crowd. Alongside the frame design, the integrated pannier rack and lighting system are the most striking features. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The new range belongs to the Bianchi Lif-e Electric Intelligence Program and is divided into three models called C-Type, T-Type and X-Type. The 3 versions are intended to set a new standard in the eMobility sector and provide an universal platform for commuters, trekking and adventure riders as well as experienced eMTBers. The new alloy models follow on from the high-end carbon eSUV’s and have been engineered with regard to design, functionality and integration in a bid to create the most comfortable and safe riding experience possible. You can find out more about the new Bianchi e-Omnia series at our sister magazine DOWNTOWN. Der Beitrag Bianchi e-Omnia 2021 – new eSUV series with city, trekking and eMTBs erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
14 - 19/01/2021 14:34:15

Which are the most stand out bike products of 2021? What are the most important trends in the bike industry for the coming year? After thousands of test kilometres and heated discussions, the results are in. Curtains up for the Design & Innovation Award 2021! 2021 will be characterised by big changes, big trends and lots of potential. The outdoor sector, in particular cycling, is booming like never before. Fitness gadgets and urban transport solutions are in more demand than ever. Startups, established brands and international big players all vie for the favour of customers with new products, purported innovations, big promises and catchy slogans. But what’s hype and which claims hold water? What are the most promising developments actually capable of? Here you can find all winner of this year’s Design & Innovation Award. You can find further background information, numbers & facts and all the upcoming bike industry trends right here: Design & Innovation Award 2021 – All you need to know. Der Beitrag Design & Innovation Award 2021 – The winners & everything you need to know erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
22 - 16/01/2021 14:17:15

Defining whether eMTBs are legally mountain bikes or motorcycles may have implications for who can access what trails and how races will be organized.( Photos: 1, Comments: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
16 - 15/01/2021 10:51:14

Innes Graham and Max Rendall hit the trails on the Radon Render.( Photos: 3 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
2 - 15/01/2021 08:34:14

We headed to Southwest Germany’s Palatinate region to chat with the MTB marathon legend Karl Platt and Le Mans winner Jörg Bergmeister about success, competitive genes and our survival instinct. While down there, we progressed from the theory of dealing with setbacks straight into a practical lesson on the subject. Oh, we also took our bikes and a Porsche for a spin! googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Shit happens. You don’t have to be a pro bike rider to know this. Journalists know it well enough. Imagine the frustration when your hard drive gets wiped just days after the exemplary interview you’ve just carried out with Jörg and Karl. Puff, gone in an instant. Karl, by this point, is already on the island of Elba for a race, Jörg is back at home with his family and we are in Leonberg at the office. Thank you, Skype. We repeat the interview, this time thousands of kilometres apart, virtually, like so much these days. Karl is reclining in a beach chair having just done a recon of the race route for the following day. Jörg has cooked dinner for his family and we are sitting in the office with three recorders at the ready (never make the same mistake twice). Aside from the initial chat, it was virtually a word-for-word recital of the original interview (as far as we can remember). Clearly, consistency whatever the condition is a key trait of pro athletes! And yes, it was just as interesting hearing it all for the second time! Hobby for one, career for another. Before we start, you need to meet the two interviewees, whose friendship goes back more than 15 years and who have two common interests. Jörg Bergmeister was basically born behind the wheel – his dad and granddad fed him on a diet of motorsports right from the get-go. He went on to claim victories at classic endurance races like Le Mans, Daytona, Sebring, the Nürburging and Spa. A driver for Porsche since 2002, Jörg took five wins at the American Le Mans Series in a 911 and now, aged 44, is still linked to Porsche as an ambassador while continuing to progress the 911 line through his role as a development driver. When not in a car, he’s probably mountain biking – not just for fitness, but also for fun. Karl Platt, 42, has known bikes all his life. His first mountain bike was picked from a catalogue at the age of 13 and he joined a local club. The first ten years of his life were spent in Siberia – a fact that many attribute to his resistance and steely determination. But has he always been so willful? The truth is, Platt has dominated the competition since he first started riding – at 18 he was German National Junior Downhill Champion before dominating the world’s cross-country MTB scene. By 2005 he’d moved into MTB marathons, racking up a string of victories. In 2007 he set up Team BULLS, where he still has a formative influence – and not just in between the tapes. The five-time winner of the Absa Cape Epic stage race in South Africa, seven-times Transalp victor and current national Mountain Bike Marathon Masters Champion also harbours a passion for motorsports. The proof: he’s clocked more than 300 laps at the Nürburgring-Nordschleife, most of them in his silver Porsche GT3 first-gen 997. Seeing as you’ve both basically won everything there is to be won,can you tell us what constitutes success? Karl: Hm … I can’t think of anything, I’m just here on the beach having a good time… Jörg: That’s a win in itself. Karl: True, I’m completely relaxed right now. That’s what it’s like: when you train so hard and ask so much from your body, you also crave a reward from time to time. Success is part of sport. At a level like ours, we aim to win, not to be chasing. Training on the limit is part of the motivation and success only comes if you’ve got goals. But I don’t think success should be narrowed down to one thing. Sometimes you have a great race but it’s not enough for the win, perhaps you take home third, fourth, or fifth. But you gave everything you had on the day, which is also super satisfying. I mean, the top step is obviously brilliant, but winning on its own… I don’t race just to win. There’s a way of life in this cool sport that always makes it so damn fun. Jörg: I can definitely agree with you on that. You shouldn’t label success based on what position you finish – even though, as a pro athlete, you’re always measured by your results. You can have a seriously great race just by committing and giving 100%. This isn’t always seen as success in the media or in the eyes of spectators, but for the athlete it is. What is the most defining characteristic for your careers – or, in simple terms:How do you win Le Mans or the Absa Cape Epic? Jörg: I basically didn’t have a choice! Even as babies, me and my brother were infected with the bug for motorsports. Granddad raced motorcycles and my dad made the move to four wheels. We got a go-kart when my brother was three and I was still two years old. Dad basically taught us everything you needed to know: it’s all in the details, not just what you’re doing behind the wheel. You have to make sure the team can work well. When that happens all at once, you can bring out the best. Karl: It was pretty different for me. No one in my family was really into sports, although they weren’t un-sporty per se. I was the first to properly take it up seriously. I think you’ve got to have a certain gene; in order to form the idea that maybe you could do it, that you could reach the top, you’ve got to have a go. Of course, then you have to work on building on your talent and train hard, but the right mentality is super important too. You’ve got to say to yourself: ‘Now I’m ready to go into the red, push myself so hard.’ Train a lot, so you end up clocking something like 30,000 km each year. There’s no other way to get to the top. What’s the biggest sacrifice you’ve made?Are there any defeats that have really stuck in your memory? Karl: I’m a pretty positive person so I can’t really think of anything I’ve sacrificed. Other people could perhaps say I’ve always put sport first, but I never perceived that as a negative thing. I trained a lot, sure, but I think it’s great seeing what we can do in this sport – it’s better than just bumming around. Jörg: You’re right. I haven’t made any sacrifices either. I’ve been in motorsports for the past 41 years and I still love it. Sure, there have been times I’ve made mistakes and things haven’t always gone as I’d want them to, but you come out stronger from these situations. This is what differentiates a pro; making the best from every situation, looking ahead. It won’t be the last time, things move on and you can prove yourself at the next opportunity. Karl: Defeats need to make you strong. Sure, you can fall, but you’ve got to get back up. In sport, in life. Athletes learn this the hard way as you end up losing more races than you win, but it makes you stronger. Each time you screw up, you aim to go harder the next time and show that you can do better. On the topic of our comfort zones: hurtling into a corner at 230 km/h with a concrete wall on the exit, or pushing right into the red in the sweltering heat of South Africa – survival instinct on full or switched off? Jörg: I’ve always preferred classic courses that challenge the driver and don’t have many run-off zones. Racing in America has always appealed to me for that reason; you find the sort of old-school routes there. Road America has to be my favourite there. It’s super quick, really hilly and really tough. This adds so much to the challenge. You have to know exactly what you’re capable of and fully trust your abilities. This sort of driving is way more interesting to me than the times when you do a lap and if it doesn’t go well, you just go and try the lap again. One exception in Europe is the Nordschleife; that’s amazing. Karl: [laughs] No second chances on the Nordschleife! You’ll either hit the wall, the crash barriers, or end up somewhere in the trees. My idea of a comfort zone is like this: some races go really well, you’re nailing it, you never push yourself over the edge, and you’re having a blast. It’s a lot about preparation. The better prepared you are, the better the race will go. I’ve also had races where I’ve been so far into the red right from the gun. Every second hurts. At times like this, you have to learn how to turn off the voice inside your head – or learn how to manipulate it just to make it to the finish. Situations like this aren’t uncommon in cycling. I think it takes a certain skill to say: ‘Ok, quit thinking, just pedal.’ Jörg: Dig in! Toughen up! Karl: Exactly, toughen up. As pros, preparation and planning are standard, but how do you deal with unpredictable events that are pretty much inevitable in your sports? Karl: I love improvising. I’m not much of a planner. I’m well attuned when it comes to observing the goings-on and knowing when to make a move. I plan everything, but also stay flexible. Training should be planned over the course of weeks, but it doesn’t need to be strict. If I don’t feel at my best then I’ll skip the hard session that could’ve been on the calendar and do something easier. If I’d written it down as a concrete plan it might feel more restrictive and your good intentions could backfire. I’m quite intuitive and look inwards when it comes to deciding what the right course of action is. Jörg: The world of motorsports is a lot like that. You make a pre-race strategy with the engineers but usually, the event unfolds completely differently with crashes or neutralisations behind the safety car. This is when you’ve got to be able to react, not be too rigid; it’s not easy. I think cycling’s a lot like cars in that sense; if you’re busy trying to use a large chunk of your brain just riding in a certain way, then you’re not able to respond to what’s happening in the race right now. They say that success can be addictive, so how do you know when the right moment is to step away from the sport and all the wins? Jörg, you’ve already retired but Karl you’re still toying with the idea, right…? How hard is the decision? Karl: You’ll have to physically take me off the bike to get me to stop. Interestingly though, this season – what with Corona and the lockdown – I’ve got to know a different side of life. It’s been nice discovering that you don’t have to travel to a race, every weekend. Cycling will stay with me though – it’s a way of life. I’ll probably always ride a bike. I plan to do some more masters races in the next few years, so it’s obviously hard for me to properly step back. Other pros talk about ‘this or that being their final race’, and then they’re out of the sport, but I can’t do that. I love it; mountain biking is my life. You can’t take a bike away from me. I think it’s pretty similar for you, Jörg? It’d be hard to get you out of a car. I’ve seen how your hands and your accelerator foot take on a life of their own as soon as you’re in the driver’s seat. Jörg: [laughs] My love for motorsports won’t die, but I’ve always promised myself that I’ll quit when I realise that I’ve lost the speed, that I’m just not quick enough any more. I don’t want to reach the stage where someone says ‘Oh, he’s past it.’ When Porsche asked me to step into development after winning the WEC last year was a fantastic opportunity. The first part of my career – driving professionally – was a dream, and now I’m in the second act and it’s just as much fun. I still get to sit in a car and drive the race tracks, but the focus has shifted somewhat. On the whole, I’m stoked with how it’s going. Any tips for us mere humans – how can we be better, faster, safer on our bikes and in cars? Jörg: My grandma always said: Don’t drive any quicker than your guardian angel can. Karl: [laugh] My grandma used to say that too! Jörg: On public roads, the main thing is always to drive under the speed limit. I’d recommend advanced driving training for safety too; I think these should be mandatory at regular intervals. So important to keep you safe, plus it helps you get to know your vehicle and how you and the car go together. Karl: Yes, agreed, that’d prevent a lot of preventable accidents. People need to realise that even at 15km/h you can be thrown out of the car if you hit something. It’s unimaginable. You’re going at slower speeds in cycling so when you crash you mainly get bruised, but you can also break bones. It’s really important to stay in your comfort zone and have fun. Sure, it can be thrilling to push your limits and feel the adrenaline kick, but you’ve got to be able to reign it in when necessary. Fun is the key word here. There are so many tensed-up riders out there looking for a needle in a haystack, not able to see the bigger picture. When you’re enjoying what you’re doing, the success is already there. Super cool, thanks for the interviews and great insights! We had a blast on two and four wheels when we met in Germany, and this online chat has been a pleasure! Der Beitrag Never Stop Learning – The Interview: MTB marathon legend Karl Platt and Le Mans winner Jörg Bergmeister erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine