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This 29er hardtail with a 130mm fork comes with a dropper post.( Photos: 7 ...

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You always meet twice in life, and with the new Domain, RockShox are reintroducing...

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Today, RockShox is announcing an all new Domain fork. Starting with Zeb’s...

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Exploring the best enduro and DH the Island has to offer.( Photos: 30, Comments: 2 )

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Komoot has added a live tracking functionality to its app that shares your location and current status with preset contacts or via a unique URL. This is a premium feature that is only available to paid Komoot subscribers. As well as showing a user’s location in real time, Komoots Live Tracking functionality will also show the route a user is following, an expected time of arrival if a course has been loaded and phone battery life level. The app will show your phone battery life as well as your current location. Komoot Rather than continuously broadcasting for the duration of an activity, Komoot Live Tracking will only update your location when someone is actually watching your feed. This will preserve both phone life and data. Unlike some of its competitors, Komoot Live Tracking doesn’t appear to have an upper limit on the number of contacts you can broadcast up to at once, with your location accessible via a unique web link. The feature is only available to Komoot premium subscribers (€59.99 / £59.99 per year). Strava Beacon offers a broadly similar featureset to Komoot Live Tracking. This is also only available to paid Strava Premium subscribers. Wahoo and Garmin also offer a similar free service via their respective apps.

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10 - 1 hour ago

Kriss Kyle shares some of the secrets behind his BMX inspired edit.

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This 29er hardtail with a 130mm fork comes with a dropper post.( Photos: 7 )

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10 - 2 hours ago

While the Domain name has been in RockShox’s line-up since 2007 (with only a brief hiatus since 2018), it’s back with a bang in 2021, borrowing much of the tech of the Zeb but in a more affordable package. With enduro bikes and electric mountain bikes demanding even stiffer, stronger forks, this new option from RockShox uses the super-wide 38mm diameter stanchions we first saw on the Zeb, released last year. The Domain has always been a long-travel, hard-hitting fork, starting off back in 2007 as a 180mm, 2.8kg monster, and that theme continues today, though with a noticeable weight saving. RockShox Domain fork key features 27.5in and 29in wheel options 150 / 160 / 170 / 180mm travel options 38mm stanchions 44mm offset Motion Control R and Motion Control RC variants 1.5in taper or 1.8in taper steerer tubes 2,540g claimed weight (fork variant unknown) 2.8in tyre clearance (27.5in and 29in) Hard-hitting enduro performance Ready for enduro and eMTB riders, the Domain should give buckets of front-end control. RockShox The new Domain line offers between 150mm and 180mm of travel, with the fork clearly taking much of its DNA from the Zeb. It’s aimed at riders looking for complete authority at the front of their enduro bike or eMTB, where stiffness is king, and stout upper tubes help deliver that. As you’d expect, the Domain is offered in both wheel sizes, across the whole travel range. Both the 27.5in and 29in forks share the same short 44mm offset for calm handling under pressure. At the top of the fork, three different depth (front to back) crowns will be offered at OEM level (for the forks you’ll end up seeing specced on off-the-shelf bikes). Best mountain bike suspension forks Deeper crowns, as found on the Domain, should make the headtube of bikes such as this Evil look a little less awkward Mick Kirkman This accounts for the oversized head tubes we’re seeing on numerous bikes these days. By offering a deeper crown, the line from frame to fork is smoother and looks less awkward. There’s no reported performance benefit to the different crowns, it’s just aesthetic. The aftermarket fork gets the standard 59mm crown, the smallest of the three. The eagle-eyed among you might have spotted above a reference to a 1.8in tapered steerer. This is yet another new standard that a small (but apparently growing) number of bike brands have asked for, most specifically for their eMTBs. Much like the change from 1-1/8in steerers to tapered, we suspect there are (theoretical) stiffness benefits. However, time will tell whether it catches on across the industry. This 1.8in tapered fork will have the deepest 69mm crown. Otherwise, 38mm stanchions feature, along with a Motion Control RC damper giving both compression and rebound adjustment on the aftermarket fork (there’ll be a simpler Motion Control R fork for OEM, too). On the air side of things, you get RockShox’s acclaimed DebonAir spring. This can take up to three Bottomless Tokens, with the 150mm and 160mm forks shipping with two pre-installed, the 170mm with one, and the 180mm fork with none plugged in to start. The Motion Control damper has been around for years, with incremental improvements over time. RockShox Inside the fork, RockShox is providing the Maxima Plush damping fluid, the first time the firm has offered this outside of the Signature Series range (Zeb/Lyrik/Pike/SID), which should further boost the fork’s slippery suppleness. All this combines to give a claimed weight of a shade over 2.5kg. Down at the base of the fork, the brake mount is designed straight for 200mm rotors. You’re covered if you want to run a 220mm rotor, with an adapter (and an adapter will also be needed if you’re running 203mm rotors). RockShox Domain price The aftermarket Domain RC will cost £530 / $549 / €594 and will be available from July 2021. The compression dial is easily accessible while on the bike, though a remote will be offered as an upgrade. Steve Behr RockShox Domain – can you upgrade it? The Domain can be upgraded down the line with RockShox’s easy-to-drop-in replacement damper units. The ‘R’ fork can have an RC damper fitted (£42 / $42 / €47) or both forks can receive a top-spec Charger 2.1 RC2 damper for £325 / £330 / €365, should you want absolute pro-level damping when you’ve the cash. There’s also a remote upgrade, should you want on-bar control of the compression circuit. The OneLoc lever costs £102 / $98 / €114. The RockShox Domain is offered in both 27.5in and 29in wheel options, with travel from 150mm to 180mm. RockShox As the Domain features a 6000-series aluminium upper tube construction, you won’t be able to upgrade to the Zeb’s air spring, as the Zeb has a higher grade tubeset with different internal dimensions. Finally, on the upgrade front, a short fender can be added for £20 / $20 / €23. This bolts into the back of the fork’s brace. Aftermarket forks will come with a zip tie fender in the box. The use of fenders may compromise tyre clearance with 2.8in rubber. A fender will be available for the Domain. Given we’re seeing the Zeb popping up on a wide range of regular and electric mountain bikes, we suspect the new Domain will be a frequent sight down on the trails, too. We have a Rockshox Domain here at BikeRadar, so expect a review very soon.

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Bike Radar
10 - 2 hours ago

You always meet twice in life, and with the new Domain, RockShox are reintroducing a classic. At first glance, the RockShox Domain with its burly 38 mm stanchions is very similar to the ZEB, but it relies on other materials and simpler damping technology to bring down the price. Can it increase confidence on your eMTB and make for a worthwhile upgrade? The moment you see it, it’s clear: the new Domain is a burly fork for eMTBs. Like the ZEB, the stiff chassis relies on 38 mm stanchions. Both the 29″ and the 27.5″ versions of the fork are available with travel ranging between 150 and 180 mm. The fork can be ridden with tires up to 2.8″ wide, provided you’re not using the mudguard. Like the ZEB, there’s an optional mudguard available for the Domain that gets bolted to the arch. The € 23 fender is made of plastic and conforms perfectly to the arch so there’s no rattling on the trail. The Domain is available with two different steerer tubes, but the standard 1.5″ tapered version is the only model relevant to us. The 1.8″ tapered version is available exclusively to manufacturers, requiring a special head tube and headset. RockShox opted for the stealth version of the axle, and while this reduces the weight, it can only be removed with an Allen key. The reincarnation of a classic, though now much more elegant! googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Like RockShox’s flagship forks, the Domain features a DebonAir air spring, allowing quick and easy adjustment to suit the rider’s weight. The progression can be adapted to individual riding styles in no time by adding or removing volume spacers. The Domain RC relies on the Motion Control damper, allowing you to adjust the low-speed compression and rebound. Thanks to the turtle and rabbit symbols, RockShox make adjusting the rebound easy to understand. If you want the fork to rebound faster, turn towards the rabbit. If you want more control and a slower rebound, turn towards the turtle. The hird-hitting 38 mm fork weighs 2,544 g, around 500 g heavier than the 35 mm Yari and almost 300 g more than the higher-end ZEB. It will be available from July 2021 for € 594 RRP. All it takes is three screws to mount the mudguard to the Domain’s lower leg arch, keeping your face clean and your eyes unclotted. The Domain’s Motion Control damper offers 20 clicks of compression adjustment. The Dual-Flow rebound dial offers 10 clicks of adjustment. With the help of volume spacers, the DebonAir air spring offers plenty of reserves for when you go big. The Maxle Stealth axle requires an Allen key. How to set up the new RockShox Domain The Domain is simple to set up due to the limited adjustment options, and the TrailHead app, the table listing rider weights and corresponding settings on the fork legs and the SAG markings on the stanchions are very user-friendly. Let’s take a look at which setup options are available. For the basic settings, simply enter the serial number on the fork crown into the TrailHead app. You can find the serial number hidden on the back of the fork crown.. From travel to colour, the app gives you all the fork’s details. If you click on “Tuning” in the app or browser, you will be redirected to the setup page. You can select your weight and the bike category on the setup page, based upon which the app will give you a personalised setup suggestion. Alternatively, you can use the table printed on the fork leg to find the appropriate pressure setting for your weight. The table recommends adding 10 psi if you’re riding an ebike, but we’d bump that up to 15 psi instead. The table makes setting up the fork a lot easier, though we’d recommend adding 15 psi for ebikes. The fork comes equipped with the entry-level Motion Control RC damper. Only the low-speed compression is adjustable. We’d advise initially turning the compression dial 2–3 clicks clockwise in the “+” direction to activate the damper, or you won’t make effective use of the fork’s travel. However, you’ll quickly feel it in your hands if you turn it too far in the “+” direction. The rebound can be adjusted using the Dual Flow rebound dial on the bottom of the fork and the TrailHead app will give you a suggested setting. To set the rebound, close the dial all the way, turning in the direction of the turtle, then turn it in the direction of the rabbit and count the clicks until you reach the number of clicks suggested for you. If you’re still not satisfied, take your time to play around with the setting to find what’s ideal for you. In general, if it is too slow, you’ll feel a lack of pop and the slow rebound doesn’t allow the fork to recover from impacts quick enough. If it’s set too fast, the front wheel won’t track as well and pass blows directly to your arms. Using the RockShox TrailHead software in the app or your browser, you can see how many tokens, i.e. volume spacers, are installed in the fork by clicking on “Fork Info”. In case you’re unfamiliar with volume spacers, they increase the fork’s progression towards the end of the travel and thus avoid bottoming out on hard landings. As a result, the travel can also be used more effectively since the spring characteristic changes and the fork can be ridden at lower pressures without increasing the risk of bottoming out. If you’re still bottoming out, we recommend adding another volume spacer. However, if you’re only using about 3/4 of the fork’s travel on the roughest trails, it might be better to remove a volume spacer so that you can make use of all the available travel. Crowded but useful: the RockShox Domain has sag indicators printed on the stanchion for all possible travel lengths. The Domain on the trail Due to the oversized crown, the transition between fork and head tube looks well-proportioned. With its 38 mm stanchions, the Domain is made for eMTBs and thus one of the few forks that don’t look out of place on a modern eMTB, promising a high level of stability and rider confidence. When riding fast, on flow trails, through berms and compressions and over high-speed jumps, you’ll quickly notice the advantages of the fork’s massive chassis. The front wheel goes precisely where you point it. For active manoeuvres, such as when pumping the bike through rollers or trying to pop off a lip, the fork lacks support, especially mid-travel. You might want to increase the compression damping for this kind of riding. It has more than enough reserves to deal with hard hits when you send to flat, off big drops and over big jumps. However, the downside of this setup reveals itself on natural and rough trails. In that case, the Domain passes even small impacts from roots and bumps on to your hands. With less compression damping, grip and comfort are noticeably increased. However, the Domain then sags excessively on steep descents and remains low in its travel. The fork also sinks far into its travel under hard braking, dropping the front end and robbing the rider of confidence. Unfortunately, we had to determine already on the first meters an annoying rattling with smaller blows on our “pre-series fork”. According to RockShox, this is a too soft spring between the shimstacks in the rebound damping. This problem should be fixed according to RockShox in series production. If it gets steeper, the domain slightly sinks into the suspension travel RockShox ZEB vs. RockShox Domain To give you the most accurate review possible, we compared the fork with a ZEB R. The ZEB might be the higher-end version of the Domain, but the model we tested doesn’t allow you to adjust the compression setting of the Charger damper. Can the generally higher-quality Charger internals score nonetheless? The Domain relies on some of the same high-quality technology as the coveted ZEB enduro fork, but you have to accept a few compromises in certain areas that help keep the price where it is. For example, the Domain uses lower-quality bushings and the stanchions are made of heavier 6000-grade aluminium. The fork crown is cast instead of being machined as with the ZEB, also increasing the weight. There are apparent differences in the setup as the rebound of the ZEB offers significantly more clicks for more accurate tuning. The air pressure also differs between the ZEB and Domain. Yari Domain ZEB Stanchions 35 mm 38 mm 38 mm Weight 2,050 g 2,544 g 2,256 g Price € 539 € 594 € 759 We would like to refer to the table above to explain the rough differences between the Yari, Domain and ZEB, which are forks you’ll likely see on an eMTB. The 35 mm Yari quickly reaches its limits due to its skinny chassis, especially on rough trails. The responsiveness of the two 38 mm forks is similar, but the ZEB remains significantly higher in its travel than the Domain and thus instils the rider with more confidence, especially when things get steep. The Charger damper in the ZEB makes it feel easier to get airborne on fast, flowing trails. Both forks are similarly progressive towards the ends of their travel and we didn’t bottom out once with either of the two forks. All said and done, the performance of the Domain is entirely sufficient for beginners while also being easier on your wallet. On the other hand, the ZEB R offers the performance of a high-end model despite limited adjustability, which is particularly beneficial for more demanding riders and does the higher price point justice. We recommend riding the Domain at a slightly higher pressure for better feedback. Does RockShox’s budget fork concept work? With the Domain, RockShox are offering an attractively priced alternative to the ZEB. The simple damper makes setting the fork up relatively easy and doesn’t overwhelm beginners. But if you’re going to ride both flowing trails and rough singletrack, you’ll have to adjust the air spring pressure to suit the terrain. Since weight doesn’t play a significant role on an eMTB, the savings from the slightly heavier fork crown and lower legs are a sensible way to lower the price. The Domain can make for a good upgrade if you have a “skinny” fork such as a Yari or Pike fitted to your eMTB. The domain also offers plenty of reserves for flat landings. Conclusion The Domain is back and it’s better than ever. Based on the ZEB’s thick 38 mm stanchions, the Domain offers plenty of reserves and a lot of stability on the trail. The damper works well for flowing trails. However, it reaches its limits in steep and rough terrain. To keep the price attractive, RockShox cut costs sensibly, relying on lower grade materials for some parts. Overall, the Domain is a good option for beginners and a solid entry-level fork for less than 600 Euros, offering eMTBs added reserves and stability. Tops38 mm stanchions offer a lot of stability and stiffnessvery progressive and offering lots of reservesPriceFlopsentry-level damperstays low in its travelour pre-production model rattles You can find out more about at sram.com/rockshox Der Beitrag Rock Shox Domain suspension fork in review – More reserves for your eMTB? erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
12 - 2 hours ago

Today, RockShox is announcing an all new Domain fork. Starting with Zeb’s architecture and 38mm stanchions, Domain whittles down the price to an impressive $549 USD by using their more affordable Motion Control damping cartridge as well as a few other cost saving measures. The Domain can still take a Zeb fender and still uses bottomless tokens to tune the progression curve of the Debonair spring. Read on for the full details in the press release below… Send it. Don’t spend it. Big value and a badass look come together under one roof in the all-new Domain. Featuring legitimate enduro capability, strength, and legacy, this robust fork is packed with value to meet the demanding needs of both MTBs and E-MTBs alike. Domain RC With bigger bikes come bigger demands. The new Domain takes cues from ZEB, our enduro specialist fork with serious credentials. Domain offers a new burly 38mm chassis, short fender compatibility, and a confidence-inspiring DebonAir air spring matched with a reliable Motion Control RC damper. We even brought the performance of Maxima Plush damping fluid along for the ride. Nothing goes as big as Domain does in value and performance. Specs Wheel size: 27.5″, 29″ Travel: 150mm, 160mm, 170mm, 180mm Damper: Motion Control RC Offset: 44mm (27.5″, 29″) Upper tube: 38mm aluminum Features NEW 38mm chassis for increased stiffness and rider confidence Motion Control RC damper featuring low speed compression adjust with externally adjustable dual flow rebound Highly tunable DebonAir air spring offers a consistent feel throughout the travel Maxima Plush damping fluid reduces friction and quiets damper noise Short fender compatible (RockShox premium fender sold separately. AM Variants include RockShox zip-tie fender) Fits tires up to 2.8” without fenders – use of a short fender may reduce tire clearance MSRP: $549 | €594* | £530* | *INCLUDES VAT | EMBARGO: APRIL 22, 2021 | RETAIL: July 2021 Available to Riders FAQ What is the intended use of this fork? The large 38mm diameter upper tubes and stiffer overall chassis are best suited to long travel all mountain and enduro bikes (150mm -180mm) as well as modern E-MTBs that benefit from a bigger, more capable front end. Domain is a fork that has the appropriate scale to look ‘right’ on E-MTBs but isn’t too heavy to find the fun way over flowy trails (2,540g / 5.6lbs). How is Domain different than ZEB? Domain leverages some of ZEB’s best features but forgoes some of its exclusive Signature Series-level spec to represent as a great enduro fork option at lower price points. Domain differs from ZEB with its 6000 series aluminum upper tubes, Motion Control RC or R (rebound-only) dampers, and bushings. Are there different steerer diameters available for Domain? Domain features 1.5” tapered aluminum steerers for both its OEM and Aftermarket options; the larger 1.8” tapered aluminum steerer is an option for OEM E-MTB models only. Why are there different crown sizes available, and why not just one size? Domain supports three different crown diameters to best match modern bike designs: 59mm as both an OEM and Aftermarket configuration option, and 63mm and 69mm crown sizes as OEM-only fork configurations. Additionally, the 69mm crown is large enough to accommodate the optional 1.8” steerer. Will the DebonAir air spring from ZEB fit in Domain? Are they interchangeable? Though both 38mm upper tubes, the DebonAir spring in ZEB will not fit in Domain. Domain uses 6000 series aluminum upper tubes which require a specific size requirement. Can I tune my Domain’s DebonAir air spring? Bottomless Tokens are available for tuning Domain’s DebonAir spring – the maximum token quantity is three (3). Domain forks will ship from the factory with the following Bottomless Tokens installed: 180mm travel – (0) tokens installed. 170mm travel – (1) token installed. 160mm travel – (2) tokens installed. 150mm travel – (2) tokens installed. Can I upgrade my Domain R to an RC? What about a remote option for the RC model? A Motion Control RC damper upgrade kit will be available for sale in the Aftermarket: 00.4318.060.000 AM UPGRADE KIT MOCO RC 38MM / MSRP $42.00 USD. There will also be a remote Motion Control damper kit available for sale in the Aftermarket: 00.4318.061.000 AM RMT UPGR ONELOC FS R RC P DOMAIN / MSRP $98.00 USD. – This Motion Control remote damper kit includes a OneLoc remote. Can you upgrade Domain Motion Control damper to a Charger damper? The Charger 2.1 RC2 ZEB Damper upgrade kit is compatible with the Domain. 00.4318.048.000 AM UPGRADE KIT CHARGER2.1 RC2 ZEB A1 / MSRP $330.00 USD. What rotor size is the direct mount brake for? What is the smallest and largest size rotors I can run? Domain is 200mm direct mount. For a 220mm rotor a 20mm post-mount adapter is needed. 203mm rotors can also be used with a corresponding spacer kit, available as an aftermarket spare. What is the largest size tire I can use with Domain? Domain accommodates tires up to 2.8” on both 27.5” and 29” platforms. Use of the optional short fender or a mud guard might decrease this clearance depending on your tire choice, so always check the fork’s static and bottom out clearance to the tire closely when a fender is installed. Is Domain compatible with a fender? Domains sold in the Aftermarket will ship with a mud guard included that attaches using zip ties. The premium RockShox ZEB short fender is an optional purchase that also fits Domain and installs on the fork leg using included hardware. Additionally, some third-party suppliers have their own integrated fender solutions riders can purchase and install as well. Please note that a fender or a mud guard might decrease tire clearance depending on your tire choice, so always check the fork’s static and bottom out clearance to the tire closely when a fender is installed. The lower leg fork arch looks like it sits much further forward. Why? The design of the lower leg must accommodate many factors – two of these include clearance for mud guards at full travel as well as headtube clearance at bottom out. What is the most appropriate RockShox rear shock to match with Domain? Domain matches well across the board with all our rear shock offerings, which offer a comparable amount of travel on a given frameset. How do I set up my new Domain? The best place to start for set up guidance is the RockShox TrailHead app. You can download the app on your favorite smart phone, or visit www.rockshox.com/trailhead. TrailHead will lead you through the different settings to adjust your Domain fork for you. Is there anything to note about service for the new Domain? Domain aligns to the cadence RockShox established for service, noting that frequent rides may move up that timing interval for you (or your dealer) to give your fork some love. Access the Domain Service Guide for all the steps required to keep your fork running its best. All this for only $549 USD MSRP?!? Seriously?!? Please, just take my money!!! Right? Domain is all about getting big value and big performance without spending big! Demand is high for all bikes and cycling components right now but RockShox is working very hard to provide you with your very own Domain to ride and love. Ultimately, it is not too hard with Domain to see that there really is “Nothing Better”! www.rockshox.com  

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MTB-Mag
4 - 2 hours ago

Berms Are Your Friend The post How To: Riding Berms With Hans Rey appeared first on Mountain Bike Action Magazine.

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Mountain Bike Action