2 - 31/07/2019 16:34:32

When you live and breathe bikes everyday, it’s difficult to know what to do when you stop spinning and sit still for a while. Thankfully we’ve got your back, with our list of recommended cycling-related books to keep your cravings at bay when it’s — heaven forbid — too hot to ride. 10 great cycling books There are plenty of really well-known cycling books on the market, but we’ve tried to veer off the tracks a little with this list, including some lesser known options, as well as some brand new publications for 2019. Recommended reads Revolution: How the Bicycle Reinvented Modern Britain, William Manners (2019) Back in the Frame, Jools Walker (2019) Pedal Zombies: Thirteen Feminist Bicycle Science Fiction Stories, edited by Elly Blue (2015) What Goes Around, Emily Chappell (2011) Mind is the Ride, Jet McDonald (2019) Gifts for cyclists: 10 of the best cycling books Revolution: How the Bicycle Reinvented Modern Britain, William Manners (2019) Revolution explores how the humble bicycle impacted many aspects of Victorian society, from racing and competition, to fashion and showing off. Duckworth This is one for the history nerds, and is reasonably hot off the press, with the paperback only released last week. William Manners, AKA The Victorian Cyclist, has written an in-depth and highly entertaining social history of cycling in 1890s Britain. Revolution explores various aspects of how the two-wheeled wonder machine improved the lives of the more marginalised areas of society, including women and the working class. It covers various social uses and areas of public life, including fashion, competition, sociability, romance and travel. So, whether your interest lies in the history of cycling, the emancipation of women, Victorian society or anything in between, we reckon you’ll really enjoy this well-researched and humorous book. Available from Amazon (£9.18/$9.36) Back in the Frame, Jools Walker (2019) Back in the Frame is charming and engaging, much like its author. Mildred Locke Jools Walker, AKA Lady Velo, is another blogger-turned-author who released a debut book this year. Back in the Frame charts Walker’s return to cycling as an adult, having not ridden since her teenage years. It’s open and honest, charming and funny, and inspiring for anyone feeling nervous about getting back into cycling after a long hiatus. On top of that, the book is an eye-opening insight into an area of cycling that may not be familiar to many readers: navigating the industry as a woman of colour. Walker shares her ups and downs in a way that’s relatable and entertaining, and her passion for all things two-wheeled and determination to get more people on board really shines through. Most of all, her story shows that there’s no one true way to be a ‘cyclist’. Walker has a passion for fashion and cycling style and shows that you can don Lycra on a Sunday for a road ride and then be back in a dress for commuting on Monday morning. A really enjoyable and accessible read. Available from Waterstones (£14.99) and Amazon ($15.26) Pedal Zombies: Thirteen Feminist Bicycle Science Fiction Stories, edited by Elly Blue (2015) If you like sci-fi, bikes, zombies and feminism, you’ll probably love Pedal Zombies. Mildred Locke And now for something completely different. Pedal Zombies, published by Portland, Oregon based Microcosm Publishing, is a collection of sci-fi stories where bicycles are central to the survival of the human race in some fashion. Imagine a future where gas tanks are dry and the only way to survive is on two wheels. Or there’s a pedal-powered zombie apocalypse on the horizon where the effect of the virus is only dulled by the ecstasy of cycling. How about a world where only reanimated bicycles roam the lands, free of human interference? Some of the stories are scary, while others are hilarious. There’s a real mixture to keep you entertained, and the nice thing is that a collection of short stories is easy to dip into whenever you have only a short amount of time to spare. Fire up your imagination, and if this kind of thing floats your boat, be sure to check out other publications from Microcosm, such as Bikes Not Rockets, Biketopia and The Velocipede Races. Available from Wordery (£7.31) and Amazon ($7.42) What Goes Around: A London Cycle Courier’s Story, Emily Chappell (2011) What Goes Around details the highs and lows of life as a cycle courier, and is a really engaging read. Mildred Locke An oldie but a goodie. Emily Chappell’s memoir about her time as a bike courier in London is a riveting read. What Goes Around takes place long before Chappell embarked upon her ultra-distance racing career (which includes being the first woman to finish the 2016 Transcontinental Race), and co-founding The Adventure Syndicate. We find her in a reception job, having completed her masters degree, and contemplating what to do with her life. Her role involved receiving important documents delivered by cycle couriers, and these frequent encounters inspired her to get back on her bike. If you’ve ever romanticised the idea of becoming a courier then this is a must-read. Chappell takes us through the highs (community, coffee and confidence) and lows (the first winter was a baptism of fire). You’ll follow her through some real personal growth, and experience both the excitement and the despair that comes with being a courier. The book will either leave you feeling satisfied that it’s not for you or have you frantically digging out your messenger bag. Available from Stanfords (£9.99) and Amazon ($16.25) Mind is the Ride, Jet McDonald (2019) Mind is the Ride is no ordinary travelogue, it’s a philosophical journey. Mildred Locke Back in 2016, Jet McDonald told us in his own words why cycling and philosophy aren’t so different. Since then, he’s successfully crowdfunded and published his debut book Mind is the Ride, a journey from West to East via the various components of a bicycle. It’s an abstract concept, but it works. Mind is the Ride isn’t an ordinary travel book. It may involve a literal journey from Bristol to India, but it’s also a philosophical journey from West to East, and an imaginary journey around the bicycle itself. Although the premise seems complex, McDonald really pulls it off. It works. His writing style is fluid and accessible, while his storytelling is compelling and self-deprecating. As you move from component to component, the bike is gradually built, the history of philosophy is explored, and the journey from Bristol to India is completed. Buckle up for the ride, and put your thinking cap on. Available from Amazon (£13.88/$21.45) Got a favourite book that leaves you raring to ride? Share your recommended reads in the comments below.

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Bike Radar
2 - 26/07/2019 14:51:32

Sonder, sibling brand to Alpkit, the outdoor clothing and kit company, has added to its bicycle range with the Cortex trail bike — a 120mm travel full suspension 29er that starts at £1,500 and is designed, it seems, to do just about anything. Best dropper posts in 2019 Best cheap mountain bikes 2020 Sonder Cortex 29er trail bike key specs 120mm do-it-all trail 29er Builds start at £1,499 Frameset available for £999 Up-to-date geometry Size-specific chainstay lengths The Cortex frame is built from hydroformed aluminium, with a 4-bar linkage suspension system. The horizontally mounted short-ish stroke shock sits under the top tube and is driven by a short link to help manipulate the suspension’s feel. The rear end of the frame is asymmetrical, with the driveside chainstay dropping lower than the non-driveside. The main pivot sits just above the bottom bracket. Cable routing looks to be fairly maintenance-friendly, with internal routing inside the down tube, but external for the mech and brakes along the chainstays. This little rocker drives the shock, as part of the 4-bar suspension linkage Sonder While many smaller brands seem to go fairly progressive with their geometry, Sonder has kept things up-to-date without pushing any boundaries; a size large Cortex has a reach of 465mm, a 66-degree head angle, 447mm chainstays and a 51mm offset fork, combining to give a 1,220mm wheelbase. The seat tube is 465mm long and sits at 74.5 degrees, while there’s 615mm of stack and 40mm of BB drop. There is an increasing number of brands giving size-specific chainstay lengths, with larger bikes getting longer stays to balance out the weight distribution of the bikes, thanks to the associated longer front triangles. Sonder is one of those, with the chainstays varying from 442mm to 450mm, corresponding to reaches varying from 420 to 485mm over the four sizes on offer. Have a listen to our latest Tech Talk podcast, for our take on mountain bike geometry. Sonder says the Cortex is designed to do just about anything Sonder Go anywhere, do anything, seems to be the message from Sonder with the company choosing to pair the 120mm frame with a 130mm fork. While 120mm at the back doesn’t sound like a lot of travel for a go-anywhere, do-anything trail bike, Sonder claims the bike is “for epic days over mixed terrain. It comes alive on long technical descents.” If Sonder has done its homework, there’s little reason to believe it wouldn’t be capable — with 29″ wheels and a nicely progressive suspension kinematic, shorter travel bikes have no reason to shirk bigger terrain. Following trends for burlier bikes, the Cortex is designed to run tyres up to 2.6″ wide for additional grip and confidence on tough tracks. The top-end bike comes with Cane Creek suspension front and rear Sonder 2020 Sonder Cortex range overview Sonder will be offering the Cortex in six standard builds. These start at £1,499 for a build with SRAM’s new SX Eagle groupset, a RockShox Recon RL Silver 130mm fork and a RockShox Deluxe shock. This SRAM NX Eagle, RockShox Revelation model comes in at £1899 Sonder Prices then rise, with SRAM NX Eagle and GX Eagle groupsets, and RockShox Revelation and Pike builds. The range is topped with the £2,599 SRAM GX Eagle Cane Creek build, which comes with a Helm fork up front and DB Inline shock at the back. Frame only options will be available, with RockShox Deluxe or Cane Creek shocks Sonder Sonder will also be selling the frame on its own for £999 including the Deluxe shock, or £1,099 with a DB Inline. You’ll also be able to purchase it bundled with a Helm fork plugged in up front for £1,899. While not unique, it’s good to see some level of customisation available, too. Buyers can pick and choose from a range of components from the likes of RockShox, WTB, Hope and Cane Creek to get a bike that suits preference and pocket alike. Three colours will be available – green, ‘crayon’ and brown Sonder While Sonder’s bikes are primarily sold online, they can also be viewed, and purchased, at Alpkit’s stores, located in Hathersage, Ambleside and Keswick. The Cortex is available for pre-order now.

Posted by
Bike Radar
2 - 24/07/2019 18:34:29

We're both amazed that you can play a bicycle pump and confused as to why you would.

Posted by
Pinkbike
4 - 23/07/2019 21:34:33

The Bike Shop Palms Cycles started in the 1920s as a bike shop in the Los Angeles neighborhood that is now known as Culver City. It moved from Main Street to Motor Avenue around 1930. Originally inhabited as a barbershop and, rumor has it, a once-rowdy pool hall, that all changed when Cap Rancier’s family bought both the bicycle operation and the building itself. Cap ran it successfully for decades and has a rich history of assembling bikes used for movies and TV. Remember the fanciful cruiser bike seen in Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure? Yep, that was built at Palms Cycles. Cap was known for his custom paint jobs and did it for 50 years. Eventually, Cap retired and was looking for someone to take it over. Andrew Smith, who already runs The Bike Shop of Santa Monica, was looking to expand. Through a little networking, he found Palms Cycles. Smith considered it, but in talking to contractors about what he’d like to do with the shop, he thought the improvements would be too expensive. He wanted to open up the space, repaint it and make it more friendly for consumers in the modern age. It took a while and some negotiating, but the two struck a deal they both liked. The construction took 2 1/2 months, but the doors finally opened on August 1, 2018. When Andrew tore down the paper covering the windows on opening day, he was shocked to find people already lined up outside the door. BIKE CENTRAL Located just a few miles inland from Santa Monica beach, Culver City has proven to be a vibrant bike community. Between the Sony Pictures studio and a growing list of tech companies moving in, there is no shortage of people looking for some good exercise and commuting opportunities. In addition to bike sales, the shop has a good reputation for service and is equipped with a hydraulic lift for heavy e-bikes and everything needed to fix anything from flat tires to e-bike motors. LEARNING TO ADAPT Smith knows that with the increasing number of bike companies now selling direct to consumer, bike shops are increasingly being cut out of the sales process, so he’s proactively contacting these companies and has now set up contracts to have the bikes sent to the shop where they’re assembled for a fee, then the customer can come in or it can be delivered. This works in a couple of ways: first, the shop isn’t billed any shipping fees, nor do they have to carry inventory for this. It’s simply labor fees, plus usually some extra sales of helmets, locks, etc. The shop does have plenty of inventory, carrying everything from less expensive e-bike brands like E-Lux, e-JOE, Civi and Addmotor, to higher-end brands like Bulls, Tern, Norco and Stromer. The brands he carries change over time as customers’ tastes do. PART OF THE COMMUNITY The shop is very involved in the community. When CicLAvia, a Los Angeles street festival that closes streets to automotive traffic and opens them only to bicycles, came to the area around The Bike Shop, they opened their doors, had display bikes and even gave away a couple of e-bikes. With their place in local history firm, The Bike Shop is now looking forward to the role they can play in providing both assist and non-assist bikes for future cyclists to enjoy. The Bike Shop 3770 Motor Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-9644 www.bikeshopcalifornia.com   THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Shop Stop: The Bike Shop appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

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Electric Bike Action
4 - 22/07/2019 15:17:33

Cycling tech often trickles down from the top-end of the sport, which makes the Tour de France the general public’s best glimpse at the bike tech they may be riding tomorrow. Whether it’s a time-trial superbike or something as simple as a super aero zipless jersey, much innovation seen at Le Tour eventually makes its way down to the cycling proletariat. But what about the tech we haven’t seen yet? What crazy new innovations will we see in future editions of the race? Drawing inspiration from kit seen at this year’s Tour and looking to the fringes of cycling tech, I’ve gazed into the (ceramic) mystic ball of the cycling industry to give you my top three predictions for the Tour tech of tomorrow. 9 of the best Tour de France riders to follow on Strava Tour de France 2019 bikes, gear and tech Suspension on road bikes is the future Pinarello released a full-suspension version of the Dogma earlier this year Pinarello I can’t imagine how many times people have made this exact point, but you would never consider buying a motorbike or a car without suspension. Why is it then that road bicycles, which travel on the exact same terrain as these vehicles, remain unsprung? To be clear, when I talk about suspension on road bikes, I’m not suggesting that Marzocchi Super Monster T-like levels of bounce will be making its way onto your dainty-tyred go-fast pew-pew wagon. The Topstone is built around a shockless rear suspension system Cannondale To my mind, I imagine suspension on road bikes of the future taking the form of something similar to that seen on the Cannondale Topstone carbon gravel bike. Cannondale’s Topstone gravel bike gets shockless leaf-sprung rear suspension This recently announced bike uses a shockless rear-suspension system that relies on the whole rear triangle acting as a leaf spring to provide up to 30mm of rear-wheel travel. While less sophisticated than any modern mountain bike suspension layout, this setup is far lighter and less complex. By all accounts, it also still adds a genuinely useful degree of comfort and control in rough terrain. Why couldn’t a similar concept be ported to the road? Pinarello’s Dogma FS is another key example. This bike uses a coil spring and a hydraulic damping circuit in the fork that runs in conjunction with an electronically lockable elastomer in the rear to provide fully-automated suspension. Our own Oli Woodman rode the previous generation of this bike and found the whole package to be very impressive. Team Sky to ride full-suspension Pinarello Dogma at 2019 Paris-Roubaix Assuming it works and could be proven to be faster (not only in rough terrain), what’s stopping further development of suspension for road bikes? Weight is, of course, the spanner in the works here. It’s inevitable that adding suspension to a road bike is going to make it heavier. However, given we’re still adding lead weights to some bikes to ensure they’re above the 6.8kg UCI limit and that pros are also happy to ride bikes above this limit in the name of aero performance, is it that far-fetched to think that an ultralight suspension system could be seen on the bike of tomorrow? Throwing the shackles of current thinking out of the window, why not imagine a future where we all ride road bikes that have a ridiculously light magnetorheological-damped suspension system that is powered by a dynamo in your jockey wheels, with the whole thing somehow utilising blockchain technology (because everything in the future is set to be built on blockchain technology). Jesting aside, this is one I’m almost willing to put money on. Watch this space. Everyone will be on tubeless and there is nothing you can do about it Tubeless tech is slowly but surely being adopted by the peloton. Ben Delaney / Immediate Media Tubeless tyres have made a surprise appearance during this year’s edition of the Tour de France — and not just during a time trial. As reported by CyclingTips, tubeless tech has made the jump onto traditional road stages at the 2019 Tour, with the entire UAE-Emirates team running 25mm Vittoria Corsa tubeless tyres during stage one. Why switch to tubeless in the first place when tubulars have worked for so long? It all comes down to speed. Tubeless tyres have been proven to have measurably lower rolling resistance than tubulars (Bicycle Rolling Resistance has extensive comparative reviews between all different types of tyres and is well worth looking into). Best road bike tyres in 2019: everything you need to know This has been common knowledge for some time and tubeless tyres have been gaining ground against the clock in the time trialling world. Outside of time trialling, tubeless technology has also seen success under Alexander Kristoff at this year’s Gent-Wevelgem cobbled classic, though the Norwegian later punctured at Paris-Roubaix on a set of 25mm Vittoria Corsa Graphene 2.0 tubeless tyres. Sagan’s bike was set up with tubeless Specialized Turbo tyres in a 26mm width in the run up to the Down Under Classic, though opted for tubulars on the day. Jack Luke / Immediate Media Peter Sagan also teased us with the suggestion he’d run tubeless tyres (on an aluminium bike no less!) on the opening stage of this year’s Tour Down Under, though he eventually wussed out and went for tubulars on the day. Peter Sagan to race alloy frame and tubeless tyres The impending announcement of an industry-wide standard for road tubeless tyres may also help usher in their arrival. Oddly, of all of the things in the list, this is the one I am most skeptical about. Tubular tyres still offer significant safety advantages in the event of a puncture because they are less likely to completely blow out and can still (just about) be ridden even if a tyre punctures. Nonetheless, speed trumps almost everything else in the pursuit of a Grand Tour win, so if tubeless tyres offer a significant advantage over tubulars, it’s entirely possible their use will become more widespread. Besides, it’s not as if the peloton cares about safety anyway; half of them are still using dang rim brakes (I’M KIDDING). Road discs are great, but do you actually need them? Aero really, really is everything The Notio Konect measures wind speed, air density, rider speed and other things, then works with a Garmin Connect IQ app to display aero information on a newer Garmin Edge computer. Oli Woodman / Immediate Media Power meters are now ubiquitous in pro racing and, as it currently stands, I honestly can’t imagine that someone would be able to win a Grand Tour without one — being able to maintain and monitor efforts within specific zones is vital to ensuring a rider is performing at their very best. Likewise, wind tunnel time is pretty much mandatory for anyone who takes their racing (particularly time trialling) seriously. How to ride faster without pedalling harder With this in mind, I can foresee devices that can measure and estimate live aero data becoming the norm at the top-end of the sport. This isn’t as far fetched as it may sound. The PowerPod from Velocomp, which measures wind speed to estimate power data, has been around for a very long time. Taking this idea further, the Konect by Notio uses a pitot tube, similar to that used on the front of a plane, to actually estimate live CdA (coefficient of aerodynamic drag). A wind tunnel on your handlebars: how real-time aero measurement could be the next big thing Notio Konect provides all your aero data without a wind tunnel With such a device at their disposal, riders would be able to adjust their position in reaction to real-time data, potentially offering a significant performance advantage mid-race. With a device like the Notio Konect, riders would be able to say whether or not their position was aero with confidence. Zac Williams/SWpix.com Such a device also opens up the possibility of a world where a directeur sportif can chide slouching riders with data-driven confidence from the side of the team car — pantomime meets the peloton! One can dream. I should add that when discussing the entries for this list, some on the BikeRadar team reckoned there was a high chance that the UCI would move to outlaw any device like this being used in competition. Given the body has recently moved to ban socks above a certain length, this doesn’t sound that unreasonable. Don’t get your chamois in a twist Look, this guy doesn’t like tubeless tyres or drag sensors either — you’re not alone. Matthew Allen / Immediate Media As an aside, even if you hate the idea of any of these ideas becoming a reality, remember that in 2019 it is still perfectly possible to build a thoroughly retro-grouchy classic steel road bike with rim brakes. I know this because I have just built one. As my esteemed colleague, Matthew Allen, once said: “a manufacturer bringing new products to market doesn’t somehow invalidate the ones you already own” — faster, lighter or more aero doesn’t necessarily mean better for you. Trust me, just because it exists, doesn’t mean ‘the man’ is going to make you ride a full squish road bike with more sensors than a jet fighter and — horror of horrors — tubeless tyres. What do you think? Am I a tech-obsessed industry-insider that can’t see that all of this progress is eroding the purity of cycling, or should we embrace the future our Di2 overlords have in store for us? As always, leave your thoughts in the comments.

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 22/07/2019 04:17:35

“This project has been years in the making; since the day I set the the Guiness World Record for longest backflip on a bicycle, it has been on my mind. Over the last few years I have been trying to obtain support for it, but after trying for so long I realized I have to make it happen on my own and build the jump on my own property and produce this whole project. However, it takes a village and there are a lot of people who this wouldn’t happen without. Ray Syron, Mike Power, JP Preston, Damon Iwanaga, Dustin Lindgren, and others. Adidas/ Five Ten has now committed to the project, so hats off to them and thanks for the support!” “I was trying to get to 150 feet last year but my shoulder started coming out very easily shortly after flipping 110 feet. This is the first time hitting the ramp since shoulder surgery and just the beginning of starting over after surgery. Should be progressing pretty fast barring any more bars to the leg!”

Posted by
MTB-Mag
2 - 17/07/2019 20:01:17

New Bikes are on the horizon at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show The post Exotic Bikes Rule appeared first on Mountain Bike Action Magazine.

Posted by
Mountain Bike Action
4 - 16/07/2019 21:51:29

BUELL’S RETURN: THE FUELL Erik Buell was an engineer at Harley-Davidson who started Buell Motorcycles in 1983 with a desire to bring the H-D motor into the world of performance sport bikes. The bikes were known for their very unique look and innovative spec that included aluminum frames that housed the gas, belt drives and perimeter disc brakes. Looking to expand their customer base beyond the heavy highway haulers they were most famous for, in 1993 H-D bought a controlling interest in the company, selling the Milwaukee V-twin-powered sport bikes under the Buell name. However, in 2009 Harley ceased production of those bikes entirely in 2009. Although Buell is best known for his eponymous motorcycles, a little-known fact is that back in the mid-’90s he designed a downhill bicycle using an under chassis pull-shock design similar to that used on his motorcycles for another American two-wheeled icon; Schwinn. Ever the creative and passionate two-wheeled enthusiast Buell is now about to launch a collection of electric bicycles and motorcycles, having teamed up with Frédéric Vasseur, the owner of the company that makes the chassis for Formula E race bikes. These are the two people you want to team up to make an e-bike! The bicycles, called Fluid, are both dual-battery bikes; one a Class 1 and one a Class 3, with a claimed range of 125 miles, and—get this—a recharge time of 30 minutes on a standard charger! They’re carbon belt-driven and should be pretty quiet. They’ll start at a reasonable $3295 and should be available late this year. The motorcycle, called the Flow, has a very modern design. There will be two versions of it; one with an 11-kW (15 horsepower) motor and one with a 35-kW (47 horsepower) motor. Like most e-motorcycles, there’s no gearbox. Unlike most e-motos, there’s no chain or belt, either. They’ve gone with a rear hub motor, cutting out the need for a normal drivetrain, likely offering even less maintenance than a regular electric motorcycle. There is 50 liters of internal storage, nice for commuters who want to ride to work and carry all their stuff. The bike will start at an affordable $10,995, about 1/3 of what the Harley-Davidson Livewire will cost. According to their website, they’re offering financing options that favor usage over ownership. It is expected to start shipping in early 2021. www.fuell.us/   THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Buell’s Return: The Fuell appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
6 - 16/07/2019 21:34:28

If you’ve ever walked the tent city that is the Sea Otter Classic’s product expo, you’ll notice a wide popularity gap among the exhibitors. On one end is the guy pushing, for example, lactic-acid muscle rollers or bicycle theft insurance or elliptical exercisers or some such nonsense. You walk by and try not to make Read More The post Ride Concepts Expands its Flat-Pedal Lineup and Finally Clips In appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
4 - 12/07/2019 16:17:29

The BikeRadar Podcast is back, with Episode 5! This month tech ed Tom is joined by senior writer Jack and tech guru Seb to discuss the finer points of bicycle design, the cross-pollination of technology from mountain bikes to road and the ever-changing world of social media. While we’ll keep listing our new podcasts here, don’t forget to subscribe to them via your favourite podcast service so they get delivered straight to your listening device as soon as they’re published. You can, of course, find our episodes on iTunes and Spotify. BMC’s 2010 TeamMachine is one influential bike! Matt Pacocha As ever, leave us comments, questions and suggestions! We want your feedback Given this is only episode 5, we’re still new to this Podcasting malarky, so, if you have time, we would really appreciate your feedback. We’ve created a very simple, very short, totally anonymous survey, so if you have a spare minute, please let us know your thoughts! Much like the people in this image, we’ll take your feedback on board. All the links you need Lugano Charter – UCI technical regulations – it’s quite the read… We’ve designed the bike of the future! The ultimate guide to rear suspension systems 10 of the best road tyres, lab tested Social media links There are loads of riders to follow on social media, but as mentioned in the podcast, here are some of our favourites. On the road side of things, Taylor Phinney, Marianne Vos, Lachlan Morton, Lizzie Deignan, and Greg van Avermaet are good follows, as are EF Education First and incredible photographers Ashley Gruber and Jered Gruber. We also find Cat3Memes, gravel_tryhard, Feedzone News and Bicycle Pubes worthy of a giggle or two, from time to time. We’re fans of State Bicycle Co’s Riding Fixed, Up Mountains, With Pros YouTube playlist (as well as our very own!) When it comes to the world of dirt, there are dozens worthy of a follow. Pro riders, such as Brendan Fairclough, Olly Wilkins, Cécile Ravanel, Wyn Masters, Kaos Seagrave, Kade Edwards, Rachel Atherton, Loose Dog Lewis, Yoann Barelli and Amaury Pierron are great. We also like Squids on Tour, Mad Dog Boris, Sven Martin, Manon Carpenter and Ben Cathro. Finally, if you really want to follow our stable of accounts, look out for BikeRadar, MBUK Magazine, Cycling Plus, Jack Luke, Seb Stott, Aoife Glass, Joe Norledge, Mildred Locke, Matthew Allen and Tom Marvin. How to listen to the BikeRadar Podcast If you want to download the BikeRadar Podcast to your iPhone, you can find it on iTunes, alternatively, it can be streamed via Spotify and all the other usual podcast services. Previous BikeRadar Podcast episodes Episode 1 – Cycling Plus‘ Bike of the Year Special (Spotify/iTunes) Episode 2 – MBUK‘s Trail Bike of the Year Special (Spotify/iTunes) Episode 3 – The BikeRadar Podcast – How do £10k bikes even exist? (Spotify/iTunes) Episode 4 – The BikeRadar Podcast – SRAM versus Shimano, and more! (Spotify/iTunes) Previous BikeRadar Tech Talk Podcast episodes BikeRadar Tech Talk Podcast Ep 1: Fork Offset — all you need to know BikeRadar Tech Talk Podcast Ep 2: Mountain bike suspension dampers

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Bike Radar