4 - 12/07/2019 16:51:30

Amazon Prime Day 2019 starts on Monday 15 July and runs through to Tuesday 16 July. It’s 48 hours of big discounts for Amazon Prime members, and non-members can gain access by signing up for a free 30-day Prime trial. We’ve rounded up some of the best cycling deals on offer ahead of the two days of discounts, but there will be thousands more products to choose from next week. What is Amazon Prime Day? First launched in 2015 to celebrate Amazon’s 20th anniversary, Prime Day is an orgy of discounts across all categories. For 2019, Prime Day actually lasts for two days and, in the run-up to the event, Amazon staged a live concert, which you can watch here featuring Taylor Swift and Dua Lipa, among others. What deals are available now? Official Amazon Prime Day deals won’t be available until Monday 15 July and Tuesday 16 July. We’ll put the best deals on this page but, in the meantime, we’ve dug out some other offers in the build-up. Make sure you bookmark this page for Prime Day. The best cycling deals on Amazon Continental GP 5000 road tyres Continental’s GP5000 is the successor to the phenomenal GP4000S II. Available in both standard clincher and tubeless variants, the GP5000 builds on the success of the do-it-all GP4000S II, one of our favourite tyres. £59.95 — Deal price from £38.45 (size 700x28mm) Continental GP5000 first look POC Do Half Blade sunglasses POC’s Do Half Blade sunglasses come in a variety of colours. Amazon The stylish Half Blades offer great coverage and an easily changed lens. £210 — Deal price from £139.27 POC Do Half Blade review Kask Protone helmet The Kask Protone is a lightweight aero road lid. Amazon The Protone road helmet combines aero design with everyday usability, and has real pro credentials as one of Team Ineos’ (formerly Team Sky) chosen lids. £195 — Deal price from £138.81 Kask Protone review Garmin Edge 130 GPS computer The Edge 130 is an impressive piece of tech. Garmin The dinky Edge 130 packs a lot of tech into a small package and has a great screen and good battery life. It’s an appealing option for riders who don’t need full-fledged mapping. £169.99 — Deal price: £137.99 Garmin Edge 130 review Garmin Edge 820 GPS computer With the launch of the new Edge 830, there are deals to be had on the outgoing model. Courtesy Garmin Now superseded by the Edge 830, the older 820 still packs a lot of features in and offers full mapping via its touchscreen. £329.99 — Deal price: £228.95 Garmin Edge 820 review Wera hex key set Can you ever have too many tools? We think not. Amazon We all love good tools, but these colour-coded hex keys from Wera are particularly convenient because it’s easy to tell which size is which at a glance. £60.99 — Deal price: £24 Allen keys: everything you need to know Muc-Off Bike Cleaner The clue is in the name Muc-Off Cleaning bikes is a chore but it’s made a whole lot easier with the help of a proper cleaner. Muc-Off is designed to be safe on all components including disc brake pads. £8.99 — Deal price: £6.99 Muc-Off Bike Cleaner review Cateye Omni 3 light Bike lights aren’t sexy but they are essential. CatEye Rear lights are hugely important, and while we’d tend to favour USB rechargeable ones, this little CatEye is so cheap that it’s worth picking up as a spare. Claimed runtime is up to 200 hours depending on mode, and it runs on two triple A batteries. £12.99 — Deal price: £6.45 Shimano R540 SPD SL pedals Shimano’s entry-level road pedals are a dependable choice. Amazon Thinking of dipping your toes in the waters of clipless? If you want 3-bolt road pedals, Shimano’s R540s work well and are about as cheap as they come. Check out our buyer’s guide to road pedals if you need some guidance. £44.99 — Deal price: £25.99 Shimano R540 pedals review

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 12/07/2019 08:17:35

We’re just a mere week into the Tour de France and there’s already been some bonkers action from Alaphilippe, who at the time of writing was just still holding on to the yellow jersey. With more action to come, it’s still anyone’s guess who’s going to win the whole event or even hold on to the yellow jersey on a day-to-day basis. It’s exciting stuff watching The Tour, so check out our guide so you don’t miss a single second of the action. Specialized’s World Cup-winning Demo 29 finally hits the market How to watch the Tour de France 2019 live on TV Elsewhere in the cycling world, we’re enjoying a World Cup doubleheader of XC, XC short track and downhill that kicked off last weekend in Andorra on the impossibly technical terrain over the mountains just outside of La Massanna. In the XC, we saw Nino Schurter take the win by a mere 2 seconds over Mathias Flueckiger, while Anne Terpstra beat Jolanda Neff by a big 36-second margin. The Short Track champions were Henrique Avancini who pipped Schurter to the post and Alessandra Kelle beat Neff by a tiny margin. And in the insane downhill competition, a determined Loic Bruni and the ever-successful Rachel Atherton won the weekend’s racing in the elite categories. It was quite spectacular. This weekend, then, the World Cup circus returns to Les Gets after a 15-year hiatus. The last time the world’s best set wheel to dirt during a top-level competition on the famous Mont Chery hillside was at the 2004 World Championships when the winner in the men’s was Fabien Barel — who was awarded the gold medal after Steve Peat crashed out in a cloud of dust on the last turn. This marked the starting point in Peat’s career as he chased the elusive World Champs title. How and when to watch the 2019 UCI MTB World Cup and World Championships So, who’s likely to win this round? War is waging for the overall lead in both the men’s and women’s races and it’s still totally up in the air about who is going to come out on top. Looking at previous form from the Crankworx events at Les Gets you might want to put money on Troy Brosnan and Rachel Atherton for the wins. Unfortunately, Rachel Atherton ruptured her Achilles tendon during Thursday’s training. This blows the women’s race wide open and it could be Marine Cabirou’s time to shine on home soil. Make sure you tune in to Red Bull TV on 12, 13 and 14 of July to watch all of the action from Les Gets — I’m certain it’s going to be an incredible weekend with some of the best racing this season has seen yet. In the tech world loads of new kit has recently been launched including bikes from Juliana and Santa Cruz, RockShox’ Reverb has been updated and BMC has gone to town producing more new bikes than you can shake a stick at, such as the Roadmachine and the XC-tech-inspired, soft tail URS gravel bike. So what delights have we got in this week’s edition of First Look Friday? Keep scrolling to find out! Manitou Mezzer Pro enduro fork The Mezzer is a good looking fork. Alex Evans Staying true to Manitou’s rear-facing arch design, the brand new Mezzer looks like a burly and capable enduro-focussed fork. Weighing 2,067g for the 180mm travel 29-inch wheeled version, it features 37mm stanchions and a Hexlock SL2 15mm axle that, Manitou claims, should help to keep the fork mega stiff. The classic rear-facing arch has been machined out to save weight Alex Evans There’s a fully-adjustable Dorado Air spring that should help you tune the ride feel along with high- and low-speed compression adjustment and low-speed rebound adjustment that are all externally tuned. The air chamber has a system called Infinite Rate Tune that lets you adjust how progressive the fork is, and how much mid-stroke support it has using a third air chamber without sacrificing small bump sensitivity. They feature both high- and low-speed compression adjustment Alex Evans The fork’s available in 27.5- and 29-inch versions and has between 140mm and 180mm of internally-adjustable travel in 10mm increments. There are also four offset options, two for each wheel size: the 650b models come in 37mm or 44mm while the 29er forks are available with 44mm or 51mm offsets. There’s external low-speed rebound adjustment and the fork uses a 15mm axle Alex Evans The fork’s black legs and chrome graphics certainly look striking and I can’t wait to bolt a set to my test bike and give them a thrashing. $999.99 Buy now direct from Manitou Red Bull Spect Fly sunglasses These Spect glasses look like they’ve been inspired by other iconic models Alex Evans Departing from its drink-focused business plan of promising to give you wings — or at least a sugar- or caffeine-fuelled buzz for 20 minutes – Red Bull is now branching out into the hard and soft goods markets. The Spect glasses are a confident attempt to mix both casual and sports-specific glasses into one package. The wire arms help to secure the glasses to your head. Alex Evans Red Bull and Spect formed their partnership back in 2016 and have now developed this range of glasses and goggles together. The Fly sunnies here feature a dual temple system that helps to secure the glasses to your head with two pre-formed wire arms that loop over the back of your ears. The wire arms are retractable into the glasses so if you’re just chilling at the pub you can slide them away — but as soon as you intend on getting rowdy on or off the bike slide them back out. You can extend or retract the wire arms at will Alex Evans The lenses are polarised and have an anti-reflection coating, so you should be able spot the fastest lines out on the bike or the quickest way to the bar. The dual temple system is available in plenty of different styles so if these Oakley Frogskin and Rayban Wayfarer inspired glasses aren’t your thing, fear not. £135 / €150 Buy now direct from Red Bull Hayes Dominion A4 hydraulic disc brakes The Dominion brake levers look smart Alex Evans Although it’s not new to Hayes’ brakes lineup, the Dominion A4 boasts a 4-piston caliper, adjustable lever reach and pad contact position and specially-designed disc rotors that claim to help reduce noise and vibrations. The Dominion is an enduro-focused brake that has been designed from the ground up to produce excellent levels of power. Hayes claims it does this by having a structurally rigid design, a Kevlar hose and a dual-port bleed system to help you get the best bleed possible. The brake lever uses cartridge bearings and the lever’s master cylinder has the smallest amount of dead stroke possible before the brake’s pistons actuate. There’s an aluminium piston with a piston glide ring to insure smooth actuation. The caliper is good looking and has some nice features Alex Evans The caliper features a system to help align it correctly with the disc called Crosshair, which uses small grub screws that you can tighten to align the brake and they use DOT 5.1 fluid which is widely available. $229.99 Buy now direct from Hayes Pro Bike Tool Torque Wrench Set There are 12 individual tools in the set and a 100mm extending bar Alex Evans Every budding mechanic aspires to build up and eventually complete their toolset, but this can come at a great monetary cost, especially if you’re wanting to fill your toolbox’s draws with Silca kit. A torque wrench is a great bit of kit to own, too. It’ll help stop you overtightening bolts, rounding heads out or stripping threads. Are cheap and good mutually exclusive? The Pro Bike Tool torque wrench set seems to indicate they aren’t. Alex Evans Enter Pro Bike Tool. Its budget-friendly torque wrench is adjustable between 2Nm and 20Nm, comes with an extension bar and 11 tool bits that include 10, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2.5 and 2mm Allen keys and Torx 10, 25 and 30 heads. The wrench uses a 1/4-inch square driver which means it’s compatible with other socket sets. The ratchet is driven using a 72-tooth cog. The torque wrench looks great. Alex Evans The set feels well made and is fairly weighty and robust, but only years of hard use will be able to show any weaknesses. I’m looking forward to spending more time with the wrench in my man cave soon. £57.99 / $59.99 Buy now direct from Pro Bike Tool BiSaddle ShapeShifter EXT Stealth saddle The carbon railed model is pretty pricey! Alex Evans Our behinds are all different shapes and sizes. That’s just a fact of life, right? BiSaddle argues that it’s going to be quite a difficult task to find a seat off the shelf that’s perfectly suited to your derriere and that’s why it’s gone to town by making an entirely adjustable saddle. The width, angle and profile of the seat are all easily altered thanks to the saddle’s split shape design. In addition, each of the saddle’s component parts are replaceable, so if you damage them or they wear out you can buy new ones. So, what’s the benefit? Well, you’ll be able to find a saddle that suits your needs perfectly and one that, if your needs change, the saddle can be adjusted to reflect those new demands. And what’s the ultimate aim? To ride in complete comfort without any numbness or soreness that can be caused by a seat. The wings are as close as they’ll go, making the saddle as narrow as possible Alex Evans The seat with its wings adjusted outwards Alex Evans The saddle might look kinda strange but we’ve been assured it’s comfy! Alex Evans Okay, so it’s a bit pricey but can or should you put a monetary value on your private bits’ happiness? $349 Buy now direct from BiSaddle

Posted by
Bike Radar
7 - 11/07/2019 20:51:39

Virgin, Utah (July 11, 2019) – ​Red Bull Rampage, the most challenging event in Freeride Mountain Biking, promises to make the 2019 iteration the greatest spectator and athlete experience in its storied history. To ensure spectators have an epic time, two great ticket options are available to guarantee an unforgettable experience. Attendees have two options to choose from, traditional General Admission, and Rampage Experience. General Admission requires bike-in access, includes a bike valet, and unbelievable views of the competition. The Rampage Experience package offers a guided hike to the Rampage course start the day before the event, shuttles to and from the event site, bike valet, a Friday lunch voucher and a seven-day Zion National Park pass. Tickets will be released on Monday, July 15th at 1:00 PM PST at: https://www.strideevents.com/events/red-bull-rampage/2019/register (Additional GA tickets will be released on 9/15 and 10/15.) TICKETING PACKAGE DETAILS GENERAL ADMISSION -​ $65 PLUS TAXES AND FEES Friday event access; Bike valet. RAMPAGE EXPERIENCE TICKET – ​$500 PLUS TAXES AND FEES Friday event access; Guided group hike to the event start; Shuttle access to and from the event site on both days; Bike valet access; Lunch voucher for both days; Preferred viewing during finals; Seven-day Zion National Park pass; Signature Rampage merchandise item. MINORS PERMITTED ONLY IF 16+ AND ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT. Red Bull Rampage is supported by Kia Motors America, BFGoodrich, Utah Sports Commission, Venmo and Red Hydrogen. More information on Red Bull Rampage can be found here: ​redbull.com/us-en/events/rampage SPECTATOR ADVISORY Red Bull Rampage features the world’s greatest riders tackling the most intense terrain of any contest on the planet – no novices here. The same applies for spectators; this event is not for casual observers. The new Red Bull Rampage venue was chosen for its ability to challenge the riders and push their limits, so it is remote, hot, unforgiving and dangerous. No transportation from the parking lot to the venue will be provided. From the lot, it is four miles to the contest venue over uneven desert terrain that you will either have to hike or pedal. If you ride it, you’ll need to check your bike at the on-site bike valet once you reach the contest venue, no exceptions. The good news is that both ticket options offer free bike valet! Spectators will be required to stay within the designated viewing areas at the base of the course near the finish line. No pets allowed, and non-adult spectators are not recommended. All on-site rules and requirements are necessary to ensure everyone’s safety and enjoyment. If you decide to attend, pack plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, extra layers of clothing, basic first-aid gear, and a flashlight/headlamp as no provisions will be available on-site. In other words, treat it like an unsupported weekend ride with your buddies. Just think ahead, be smart, and come prepared to have an amazing time. ABOUT RED BULL RAMPAGE Featuring a world-class broadcast team including Sal Masekela, Pat Parnell, Tina Dixon and freeride mountain biking legend Cam McCaul, Red Bull Rampage coverage begins Friday, October 25th at 9:00am PST/Noon EST, live and on-demand on Red Bull TV. Red Bull TV is distributed digitally as an app across mobile phones, tablets, consoles, OTT devices, Smart TVs and online atwww.redbull.tv. ABOUT RED BULL TV Red Bull TV features beyond the ordinary live events and videos featuring inspirational stories covering sports, music and lifestyle entertainment. Anytime, anywhere. Red Bull TV is available on the web, connected TVs, gaming consoles, mobile devices, and more. Accessible via the web at ​www.redbull.tv​ and its Android, iOS and Windows Phone applications, Red Bull TV is also available as a pre-installed channel on Apple TV and Samsung Smart TVs and as a free, downloadable app on Amazon Fire TV, Kindle Fire, Chromecast, Nexus Player, Roku Players, Roku TV models and Xbox consoles. ABOUT THE MARZOCCHI PROVING GROUNDS Tickets for the inaugural Marzocchi Proving Grounds presented by 5.10 the same day as Red Bull Rampage: July 15th. The event will be the first official athlete qualifier for the 2019 Red Bull Rampage. The event will take place at Oregon Dirt Park, just east of Bend, OR, on September 6th – 8th. The action packed mountain bike festival weekend, will include top pros at Black Sage which is part of the ​FEST series​ on Saturday, September 7th and Proving Grounds​ on Sunday the 8th. The festival will offer individual ticket sales as well as weekend camping passes that will include exclusive access to the venue, camping, industry vendors, food trucks, craft beer, music and more. Tickets are limited and go on sale Monday July 15th – please visit H5 Events website for more information. ABOUT UTAH SPORTS COMMISSION: The Utah Sports Commission is a not-for-profit 501c3 charitable organization governed by an all-volunteer Board of Trustees consisting of statewide sports, business, community, and government leaders. The Sports Commission was created to be a catalyst for Utah in its Olympic legacy efforts and to help enhance Utah’s economy, image and quality of life through the attraction, promotion and development of national and international sports. The Sports Commission works closely with communities, sports entities, and organizations to provide event services ranging from the bid process, on-site logistics, volunteer coordination, sponsorships and promotional opportunities and other related services. For more information, visit ​www.utahsportscommission.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
4 - 11/07/2019 08:17:34

The previous iteration of Scott’s Gambler first debuted in July 2012 and featured a radical-looking linkage-actuated single pivot. Back then, it also featured a bonkers stock 62-degree head angle that you could adjust with headset cups from 60 to 64 degrees, a high and low shock setting and chainstay length adjustment. The bike certainly set a new precedent with its adjustability and potential to grab headlines with its geometry figures — even compared to today’s bikes. Rad, red Maverick joins Juliana, and Santa Cruz Hightower gets an update Best cycle computer for 2019 | GPS cycle computers for riding, training, touring and navigation After a few years and several iterations that incrementally increased compatibility for 650b and 29-inch wheels, along with changes to the linkage, it became pretty clear more recently that the Gambler was up for a full refresh. Scott’s recent form shows great promise — the Spark, Genius and Ransom bikes all seem to be pleasing our testers, so we were all excited to see what they’d come up with for the new Gambler that we’ve seen Brendan Fairclough and the rest of the Scott team racing at world cups over the past year. 2020 Scott Gambler 900 Tuned frame details The graphics are simple and classy. Alex Evans The Tuned models in Scott’s range sit at the top end of the spectrum, normally made from the highest-tech carbon materials in a bid to create lightweight, maximum performance kit. The 900 bikes across Scott’s range usually come equipped with the plushest parts, too. So it’s safe to assume that the Gambler 900 Tuned is the range-topping, halo model. Stiffness was the objective What tech do you get, then? Both the front and rear triangles are made from carbon, as is the rocker link. The rocker link uses a traditional carbon layup that, Scott claims, weighs just 160g. The main frame is made using Scott’s Evolap layering technology, which it’s manipulated to generate what it claims is a perfect balance between stiffness and compliance. This balance is carefully generated by managing both lateral and torsional stiffness values. The idea is to maintain torsional stiffness along the bike’s length while being able to introduce lateral compliance that should, it claims, reduce rider fatigue. The latest iteration of the Gambler is the result of plenty of testing, and in a bid to investigate where the right sort of stiffness comes from, Scott built Gamblers in varying frame material configurations. The 900 Tuned Gambler tops the DH bike range. Alex Evans Scott’s findings revealed that a bike needs to be consistently stiff from front to back — if the rear end is particularly flexy, but the front is mega stiff, the bike will ride in an unruly way. But if the bike’s stiffness is uniform then the bike will corner and ride better. Scott says it worked hard to create a Goldilocks front to rear stiffness ratio after correlating bench testing with real-life feedback. That particular ratio is on a need to know basis though. The result is a bike that has boosted torsional stiffness with improved lateral compliance, or at least that’s what Scott claims. The other point it was keen to raise is that the bike’s compliance comes from its chassis — particularly the tubes and overall construction — not its pivots or pivot bearings. The chassis is easier to tune than a joint between two tubes, such as a pivot bearing. It decided to use double row bearings on the pivot that connects the seat and chainstays, and the pivot that attaches the seatstay to the linkage plate. This, it says, should help to improve the stiffness of the pivots. The suspension’s rocker is mega-light. Alex Evans Thanks to the bike’s overall construction Scott was keen to point out that, unlike some other bikes on the market and the previous Gambler, you don’t have to ride it to within an inch of its life to get the most from it — it’s just as happy cruising as it is being pummeled downhill over the gnarliest terrain by Brendan Fairclough. Proprietary chain device and bash guard The chain device’s mounts have rubber to help reduce shock transfer from impacts into the frame. Alex Evans In a bold but totally understandable move, Scott has decided to ditch the ISCG05 chain device mounting standard with the aim of having more freedom to design the best, strongest and stiffest chainstay to main frame link, shedding weight and not being constrained by the nature of where the mounting holes need to be. Normally, an engineer is forced to reduce the main pivot’s width and then shape the chainstay tube around the ISCG05 mounts, but not so with this proprietary design. The chain device is designed to be run with 32-, 34- or 36-tooth chainrings only. The bash guard is not mounted using a tradition ISCG05 system, instead using Scott’s own method. Alex Evans Scott was also keen to point out that it’s not designed and isn’t trying to implement a new standard here — the chain device and mounting system are bespoke for the new Gambler, so don’t expect to see it popping up on any other manufacturer’s bikes. Doing away with the in-frame threads that add considerable weight to the bike, Scott’s new chain device mounts using rubber shock absorbers that should reduce shock transmissions to the frame. As a bonus, it’s possible to remove the chain guide without taking the cranks off or having to creep an Allen key through the holes in the chainring. The chain guide attaches to the bike using the main pivot. Alex Evans The other key benefit is that the main pivot has been made as wide as possible, which should help the bearings to last for longer and make the pivot stiffer. Scott claims that the whole system weighs 113g. It was also very keen to point out that the chain device and its parts are going to be readily available from Scott’s website and retailers for a yet to be confirmed price. Flip chip geometry adjustment and wheelbase options The new Gambler has an impressive array of geometry adjustment options. There are four different shock mounting points: a high and low mode and more and less progressive modes that can be used in both bottom bracket height settings. Scott’s tuning guide has details on which settings are suitable for which tracks. It’s also possible to adjust the bike’s wheelbase thanks to two positions on the chainstay for the rear wheel, and Scott says you can use both short and long settings with 29- and 27.5-inch wheels. The 900 Tuned Gambler comes with a +/- 1-degree headset cup so you can further adjust the geometry, and a plus 15mm stack bottom headset cup if you want to run 27.5-inch wheels to reclaim some of the lost height that you get from changing to 650b from 29-inch hoops. The devil is in the detail You also get an integrated carbon down tube protector, internally-routed cables, fork bump stops and driveside chain and seatstay protection to help reduce noise. The integrated down tube protector is a nice touch. Alex Evans 2020 Scott Gambler 900 Tuned geometry Head tube angle: 62.9 degrees (low setting) / 63.2 degrees (high setting) Head tube length: 110mm/4.3in Horizontal top tube: 621mm/24.4in (low setting) / 618.9mm/24.4in (high setting) Standover: 712.1mm/28in (low setting) / 705.8mm/27.8in (high setting) Bottom bracket height: 345.4mm/13.6in (low setting) / 342.6mm/13.5in (high setting) Wheelbase: 1,270mm/50in (low setting) / 1,272.8mm/50.1in (high setting) Seat angle: 63.8 degrees (low setting) / 64.2 degrees (high setting) Chainstay: 438.7mm/17.3in (low setting) / 435mm/17.1in (high setting) Reach: 460.4mm/17.3in (low setting) / 465mm/18.3in (high setting) Stack: 633.5mm/24.9in (low setting) / 631.3mm/24.9in (high setting) *All geometry figures for size large. Low setting for 29-inch wheel. High setting for 27.5-inch wheel. Thanks to the bike’s flip chip, wheelbase adjustment and the headset cups, it’s possible to modify the bike’s geometry. The standard bike’s figures look good, too, and it’s nice to see a long wheelbase figure, a solid reach number and relatively long chainstays that can be made longer. The yellow pops! Alex Evans Seat angle issues Scott has increased the seat angle on the small and medium bikes to help smaller riders use bigger wheels. It thought that the biggest issue smaller riders had with running 29-inch wheels was that they couldn’t get the seat low enough without it buzzing the tyre. Scott’s solution to this problem is neat — essentially the seat has been moved forward away from the rear tyre by increasing the seat tube angle by three degrees on the smaller-sized bikes. The stubby seat helps to reduce contact with the back tyre at full suspension compression if you run your seat particularly low. Alex Evans Scott has also designed a custom saddle for the bike that should help to reduce tyre buzz even more. The seat’s rear has been made much shorter to help shorter people feel at home on big wheels. The seat is specced on the Gambler but will feature on the Ransom soon and will be available as an aftermarket purchase in the not too distant future for €99.90 — international pricing TBC. 2020 Scott Gambler 900 Tuned suspension The Fox X2 DH shock uses a coil spring and is highly tuneable. Alex Evans The most notable change to the Gambler is its silhouette — gone is the intricate linkage of the old bike. It has been replaced with a Horst link system that has the same look and technology as the rest of Scott’s full suspension lineup. With the ultimate aim of reducing anti-rise numbers (how much the bike’s suspension squats under braking, effectively countering the forward motion of your mass and preserving your bike’s geometry) compared to the old Scott Gambler, the engineers at Scott settled on the Horst-link design that, in this configuration, produces around 40 to 50 percent anti-rise. The most notable benefit of lower anti-rise is more active suspension under braking, which in theory helps improve control. Some people disagree with this statement, saying that it’s better to preserve the bike’s geometry and sacrifice suspension performance under braking because it makes the bike more predictable and reduces the feeling of being pitched forward. The two trains of thought are at odds with one another, but Scott clearly believes that lower anti-rise numbers are better — the old Gambler had a high figure (around 100 percent), while the new one is reduced. It has a striking yellow paint job that could be seeing its way on to all of Scott’s Tuned mountain bikes. Alex Evans The Horst-link system, it says, is also easy to tune and is structurally efficient, providing a stable and stiff rear end. It did experiment with high pivot points, and given how popular they’ve become in recent times we don’t blame Scott. Its research concluded that the benefits of a high pivot don’t outweigh the pitfalls of designing the system. Plus, high pivot bikes generate high levels of anti-rise, something Scott wanted to avoid. The flip chip lets you change BB height and how progressive the suspension is. Alex Evans The adjustable progression rate that’s dictated by the flip chip’s position changes the bike’s progression from 30 percent in the more linear mode to 35 percent in the most progressive mode. The progression curve is virtually straight for both settings so it makes the shock easier to tune — there are no abrupt changes to the bike’s inherent kinematic. To top it off, if you change the bottom bracket setting from high to low the progression rates remain virtually identical. This also means Scott was able to opt for a coil shock that’s inherently more linear than an air-sprung equivalent. 2020 Scott Gambler 900 Tuned specifications and pricing The Fox 49 fork is a DH stalwart. Alex Evans Frame: Carbon front and rear, Horst-link suspension, adjustable geometry, 12x157mm dropout, BB107, 27.5- and 29-inch wheels compatible Fork: Fox 49 Factory, 203mm travel, Kashima stanchions, GRIP2 damper, 20mm Boost axle Rear shock: Fox DH X2 Factory, 225x75mm, 500lbs spring (size large) Headset: Syncros DH adjustable +/- 1-degree Rear mech: SRAM X01 DH 7-speed Shifter: SRAM X01 7-speed Brakes: SRAM Code RSC, 200mm rotors (front and rear) Cranks: SRAM X01 DUB, 34-tooth chainring, 165mm arm length Chain device: Scott DH custom Bottom bracket: SRAM DUB MTB107 Handlebar: Syncros Hixon iC DH carbon, 15mm rise, 8-degree sweep, 800mm wide Seatpost: Syncros DH1.5, 31.6 diameter Seat: Syncros Comox 1.5, titanium rails Chain: KMC X11-1 Cassette: SRAM CS PG-720 DH 11-25 teeth Tyres: Maxxis Assegai 29X2.5-inch, Kevlar bead, DH, TR, 3C Maxx Grip Wheels: Syncros Revelstoke DH1.5, 32 spoke, tubeless ready Weight: 15.7kg / 34.61lb (size large, without pedals, actual weight) Price: €7999 The Hixon bar’s shape looks good to us. Alex Evans The all-in-one Hixon bar and stem certainly look the part. Alex Evans The bar and stem might not be to everyone’s taste though. Alex Evans The front end of the bike looks purposeful. Alex Evans The Hixon stem has an effective 50mm length. Alex Evans The X01 DH cranks are fitted with SRAM’s new rub protector. Alex Evans The 7-speed X01 DH mech is sturdy and compact. Alex Evans SRAM’s Code brakes have exceptional power. Alex Evans You’ll find stopping a doddle with the SRAM Code brakes and 200mm rotors. Alex Evans The integrated Syncros fender is tidy and well-designed. Alex Evans The mounting points on the back of the fork’s arch line up with the fender’s holes. Alex Evans The Greg Minnaar-designed Assegai tyres are a favourite among racers. Alex Evans The Syncros wheels are DH-specific but aren’t made from carbon like the bike’s frame. Alex Evans They’re tubeless-ready so you can run DH-casing tyres without the weight penalty of tubes. Alex Evans The 900 Tuned model is dripping in the best, latest and highest performing kit around that includes the fantastic 29er Fox 49 fork with the GRIP2 damper, a matching Fox X2 DH rear shock that, like the fork, boasts high- and low-speed compression and rebound adjustment and a thoroughbred selection of SRAM X01 DH drivetrain kit. You also get DH-casing tyres and a smattering of Syncros (Scott’s in-house component manufacturer) parts including seatpost, wheels, bar, stem and saddle. The all-in-one Hixon iC DH bar and stem combo is quite the looker and as an aftermarket product will set you back €349.90. The one-piece system is seen across Scott’s mountain bike and road range under different monikers and it’s interesting to see one on a DH bike. Scott openly admits that it’s a love it or hate it affair. There’s a lack of bar roll adjustment, so if you’re into freaky angles it might not be the one for you. Syncros has made an integrated front mudguard for the Fox 40 fork that looks incredibly sleek and is compatible with both 27.5- and 29-inch wheeled versions of the fork. The fender will be available to buy aftermarket for €19.90. 2020 Scott Gambler 900 Tuned frame kit The integrated fork bumper acts as the internal cable routing port Alex Evans A frame kit of the 900 Tuned version is available and is supplied with headset cups, geometry and suspension kinematic adjustment and chain device. It doesn’t come with the Hixon bar or Fox 49 fork, however. The integrated, internal cable routing looks smart Alex Evans The frame kit retails for €4,199 including shock. The bike will be available to buy in shops from mid-November 2019.

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 10/07/2019 20:34:36

Today, e*thirteen unveiled an all new tire dubbed the AT, which is short for all terrain. It should surprise precisely no one that it’s aimed at being a versatile all around trail tire that works well in a wide array of conditions. They were nice enough to send us home from Sea Otter with one of the new tires for testing in advance of their release. We’ve also been riding their SS (semi slick) tire, which was released in the fall, for a few months now. You can find our thoughts on that tire here. Details All Terrain TRS 27.5″ or 29″ (tested) 2.4″ width Plus, Race and Mopo (tested) compounds available 1 ply 120 tpi Aramid side protection Nylon breaker top protection 1015 grams claimed – 1062 grams on our scale On first glance, the AT looks a bit like the offspring of a Specialized Butcher and a Maxxis Minion DHR2, and that’s just fine with us as both of those tires are quite good. In terms of profile, compared to most of e*thirteen’s tires, the All Terrain is much more round and the side knobs are a substantially lower. Much of the brand’s prior offerings have featured a relatively square shape with rather tall side knobs and fairly low profile center lugs. The claimed (1015g.) and actual weight (1062g.) varied slightly, but for a big wheeled, 2.4″ wide single ply trail tire, the AT comes in at a very respectable weight. A very interesting feature from e*thirteen is the Aramid protection on the sidewalls. They’ve used the material under the tread for some time, but now visible, it sports a distinct look. Synonymous with Kevlar, it’s a material that’s known for its resistance to cutting and tearing and a great strength to weight ratio. Despite the fact that they are already lower in height, the side knobs have horizontal siping and a vertical relief channel to encourage some flex. We’re testing the single ply casing version of this tire, but it’s also available as a dual ply in both a mid weight Enduro tire as well a DH tire. On the trail It’s always exciting testing out new compounds, and the AT tire features e*thirteen’s new “Mopo” compound. According to their description of the new rubber, it is an “ultra high-tack, slow rebound tread, with a harder base for better tread wear and faster rolling”. Upon first feel, the rubber doesn’t seem all that soft and squishy, but that’s likely due to the firmer compound supporting it from below. That support lends a hand in keeping things faster rolling and certainly seemed to help improve durability. It also meant that under heavy weighting in the corners, the knobs didn’t give way and fold over which eventually leads to tears and degradation. Credit is also due to the slow rebound nature of the compound, which helps prevent the tire from feeling erratic. As mentioned earlier, the tread pattern was reminiscent of a mix of a Butcher and a Minion DHR2. It’s worth noting that the AT seemed to roll faster than both of those tires and while it didn’t quite have as much of a savage cornering bite as a (new) Butcher, its side knobs held up better and deformed less due to its slower rebound rubber. Braking power was par for the course for a tire of this stature – it was just the right amount. In short, the AT sports a very well rounded (no pun intended) tread pattern. As far as the casing is concerned, no flats occurred during my testing, but part of that time frame was spent with Cushcore’s new XC inserts installed. While it’s hard to make any bold claims about the effectiveness of the Aramid reinforcement, it seemed to do a good job and put the puncture resistance:weight ratio at a good place for a mid duty trail tire. The sidewalls also resisted folding over in the corners fairly nicely whether inserts were installed, or not. Their thickness sort of split the middle between the average lightweight and heavy duty casing, which is nice. Overall In summary, the new AT is an excellent tire and I think that e*thirteen is definitely on to something with the new Mopo compound. With that in mind, I tend to prefer a well supported, slow rebound rubber. Cornering and braking were all very impressive, but best of all it rolled very quickly and efficiently – far better than any other e*thirteen tire models out there, and better than the two tires that it bears resemblance to. Basically it’s just a damn good all arounder that should suit most riders in most conditions. I also applaud the new, rounder profile – at the end of the day, despite how stacked the tire market is, these are definitely worth consideration. www.bythehive.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
8 - 10/07/2019 10:34:34

Specialized has launched the latest incarnation of its popular Demo downhill bike for 2019, and now it’s built around 29-inch wheels. Nino Schurter’s limited edition Scott Spark RC Best mountain bikes under £1,000 Any fans of downhill racing, particularly those who follow the French gent Loic Bruni and his teammates at Specialized Gravity (Finn Iles and, until this year, Miranda Miller), have been waiting for this moment. The Californian brand has been conspicuous in its development of the Demo 29. Versions of the prototype were rolled out for racing in 2018 and then shelved again, sent back to R&D for fine-tuning, with the team running the previous Carbon Demo to great success — Bruni of course won the 2018 World Championships in Lenzerheide, Switzerland. The less costly Demo Expert 29 is the ‘journeyman park and race bike’, according to Specialized. Specialized By UCI Downhill World Cup 2019 Round 1 in Maribor, Slovenia, Bruni and Iles were ready to race the bike at the highest level. Both riders proved exceptionally fast, with Bruni taking that opening race win and two further victories since. That’s three out of four 2019 World Cups for Bruni on this new bike – more wins in one season than his pre-2019 total. The bike clearly works. There is a caveat to this fairy-tale beginning, but we’ll address that later. Specialized Demo 29 development and geometry Specialized explains the months and years of hard work that has gone into the bike in simple terms. Its aim through development was a bike that was built around 29-inch wheels because they “better maintain their momentum in rough sections”, carried speed more efficiently over square-edged hits through refining suspension action, were more stable under hard braking and pedalled well when it was time to get on the gas. A refined, more rearward axle path is, according to Specialized, the key to bettering performance in square-edged hits. It hasn’t gone to the extremes here, because it believes in balance and not focusing on one characteristic at the expense of another. Too much and the bike’s geometry can noticeably change through the suspension cycle, as well as create excessive chain growth and sacrifice small bump sensitivity. It opted not to include an idler pulley (such as that on Commencal’s Supreme DH), which can help eliminate pedal kickback and allow a more rearward axle path, to avoid the extra friction incurred by this solution and because “the right amount of chain growth can help create effective anti-squat and improve pedalling performance”. Anti-squat on the new Demo 29 is increased by 300 percent over the previous model. This geometry chart shows the difference between the old Demo and the new Demo 29. Specialized Likewise, anti-rise increases by 70 percent, a move Specialized says was made in order to better the ride under braking. This increase means the bike compresses less during braking; more stable geometry means the rider moves around less to compensate. Geometry-wise, the Demo 29 is mostly bigger, longer and taller. Stack height is increased by 19mm to 633mm, bottom-bracket height is up by 8mm to 350mm in order to “balance the bike’s ability to corner, yet not hit pedals in pedalling sections of DH tracks”, head angle is slackened by nearly one degree to 62.7 degrees, front-centre, wheelbase and chainstay are all longer than before. Specialized Demo 29 wheel size All-in-all, the Demo 29 seems like a fierce speed machine that is likely to sell like hotcakes to the racing community. The caveat is that Specialized Gravity is gaining all its success with a 27.5-inch rear wheel on the bike (a recent change in UCI ruling means racers can compete with different size wheels, something previously not allowed). In Specialized’s own words, the “Demo is R&D in motion”, and we shouldn’t rule out the introduction of a 27.5-inch kit in future. Constant development is also the reason this bike is alloy, not carbon. The Demo 29 is available in three sizes, with two full-build options and a frame-only option. A frame kit, including shock is available. Specialized Specialized Demo Expert 29 Frame: Demo 29, M5 alloy, 200mm travel Colour: Gloss-Storm Grey-Rocket Red Rear axle: 148mm Fork: RockShox BoXXer Select 29 fork Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Coil Select Plus Brakes: SRAM Code R 4-piston Drivetrain: SRAM GX DH 7-speed Price: £4,499 / $5,000 Specialized Demo Race 29 Frame: Demo 29, M5 alloy, 200mm travel Colour: Gloss-Metallic Black-Burnt Yellow Rear axle: 148mm Fork: Öhlins DH 29 Shock: Custom Öhlins TTX Brakes: SRAM Code RSC 4-piston Drivetrain: SRAM X0 DH 7-speed RRP: £6,499 / $6,500 Specialized Demo Race 29 frameset Frame: Demo 29, M5 alloy, 200mm travel Colour: Gloss-Acid Mint-Burnt Yellow Rear axle: 148mm Shock: Custom Öhlins TTX, trunnion-mount rear shock Price: £2,749 / $2,500

Posted by
Bike Radar
12 - 09/07/2019 07:34:29

Richie Schley is one of the big freeride legends that have brought a new spirit and style to mountain biking and helped to shape our sport. We caught up with the Cali-Canadian during the presentation of the new YT DECOY on the Cote d‘Azur to talk bikes and of course, shred some trails! So Richie tell us, how did you get into eMTBing and how has it changed your life? Well, I’ve always been curious about the e-bike, because in my mind I picture it as a shuttle. You know instead of having to drive up the mountain or take the lift or whatever. But I go back and forth because I don’t have that many friends in California who have them, so I think the more people that get the e-bikes the more fun it’ll be and I think I’ll use it a lot more. I think it’s super cool because you can just do so much more riding. You have to be so fit in this sport in order to enjoy the downhilling unless you have a lift or crew that want to shuttle together. I think to have longer travel, more aggressive e-bikes you just get way more riding in. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); When did you start riding e-bikes? I think about five years ago. Then I switched brands, and YT didn’t have an e-bike until now so I kind of mellowed out. But I’m super excited now because it’s back on again. I really believe e-bikes are pretty awesome for the sport, and I’m yet to hear an argument about the dangers or hazards or negative part of e-mountainbiking. Every argument I’ve ever heard I don’t think its a legit argument, I think people should be open and if its a pedal assisted e-bike I think it should be able to be on all trails like all mountain bikes. You’ve been living in the US, in LA, for seven years now. How do you see the situation there? Right, where I’m living, in Orange County, I think in most of the parts it’s illegal to ride an eMTB. And I think that it’s gonna take time. I was spending a lot of time in Germany watching the evolution, and I think it’s just when people don’t understand something, they’re skeptical. So I think there needs to be an education process, and the laws need to be more specific because a pedal assisted bike makes no difference compared to a mountain bike. I think it’s going to take time, and hopefully when more people adopt the sport then hopefully we will have a better position because more people fight for it. What are the most common prejudices you hear? Well, I think people think you’re going to be coming too fast and have a collision, but I think we all know on a flat trail when two people are coming the opposite direction you can have a collision no matter what bike you’re on right? And then I hear people say “oh people will be coming up trails you don’t expect them to come up, but yet where I live we hike-a-bike up super steep trails or if you’re a really good rider you can pedal up sections so that can occur also. The other one I hear is people will get too far out where they shouldn’t be and they’ll get themselves in danger. But when I’m home I’ll run into people once a week who are hiking and are lost, so they’re all just ridiculous fabrications of a problem, I believe. I think people also believe that there’s gonna be trail erosion, and as you know if you’ve ridden one of these bikes, it’s kinda hard to erode the trail unless you’re really trying to, so arguably someone can do that on a normal mountain bike also. The one that I hate the most is that it’ll bring more people to the sport who shouldn’t be there, but that’s just selfish and we shouldn’t have that attitude. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Have you experienced first-hand how e-bikes can bring new people into the sport? A lot of my surfer friends want to mountain bike but they’re not fit that way, their physical fitness is different, so I can’t wait to put them on an e-bike and get them into the sport. There are a few older surfer guys that used to mountainbike a little bit, but then they went and bought an e-bike, and now they’re so into it. Mountain biking is such a hard sport, it’s so physically demanding, and to climb the hills takes too much commitment to have the fitness needed to do it for a lot of people. I think that’s where the bike will really open people’s eyes, as you don’t have to have this commitment to being physically fit in the same way, and you can still enjoy the sport. What do you think could help to reduce the existing prejudices in the US? In Europe, eMTBing is a huge thing and no one is really thinking about it, it’s just naturally there and evolving. I think in the sport of mountain biking we have a few issues. In my whole time in the industry, every new product gets criticised. The front suspension, the rear suspension, the dropper post, the disc brakes, it’s all cheating, cheating, cheating. I mean, how can suspension be cheating? And now this is another thing, it’s just a little step further because you’re helping with the power. The people that are cross country racers or riders who are in it for the toughness and stamina have that conversation all day. But for the people who do this sport because they enjoy it, this is a way to enjoy it more so why would you criticise it? More people need to try it and see it and realise there’s really no difference. I think it’s just going to take some time. Thank you for the interview, Richie! It was so much fun flying up and down the hills here with you on electric wings! Der Beitrag Interview: Richie Schley, and the prejudices against eMTBing in the US erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts
09/07/2019
10 - 08/07/2019 17:17:31

YAMAHA WABASH Yamaha shocked the world in 2017 by announcing four new bikes at the big North American bike show, Interbike. Those bikes went into production and started shipping to consumers last year, and we’ve had a chance to ride all of them and review one so far. They announced the fifth bike to their lineup last year by announcing a drop-bar gravel bike called the Wabash. It’s named after the Wabash Trace trail that runs over 60 miles through Iowa—from Council Bluffs to the small town of Blanchard near the Missouri border. Yamaha delivered us one of the very first Wabash units to hit the U.S., and we couldn’t wait to ride it and see what it’s like. THE BIKE The Wabash is a drop-bar bike with a traditional, double-triangle frame with modern amenities like thru-axle wheels and disc brakes. The aluminum frame and fork construction make for a solid but stiff ride. Cable routing is largely internal, and there are external cable clamp bosses to mount a dropper post, if you’re so inclined. The seat tube is 30.9mm to fit a variety of posts available. There is a bottle-cage mount on the seat tube and bosses, and mounts for a rear rack and front and rear fenders. THE PARTS A SRAM Apex drivetrain is complemented by a KMC X11e e-bike-specific chain. SRAM dual-piston hydraulic brakes are plenty for this bike, and the magnet for the speed sensor is built into the rear rotor, while the sensor is integrated into the rear of the frame, something Yamaha started with their other bikes. The single shifter is integrated into the rear brake lever. The 700c rims are mounted with Maxxis Speed Terraine 33mm tires, which are a good choice for the right combination of low-rolling resistance and off-road grip, as they have really small knobs in the center but more aggressive ones towards the side to aid in cornering. The tires are tubeless-ready, but the rims aren’t. Larger tires with more volume can be used also, but Yamaha suggests not going over 40mm if you ever plan to mount fenders and/or a rack on the bike. The wide handlebars are meant for gravel riding and are covered with padded cork tape. An integrated small headlight comes on with a push of a button on the display. It’s bright but has a fairly narrow beam. THE MOTOR Yamaha had two choices for which motor to put in the Wabash. Since it’s an off-roader, at least part-time, they could have easily put in the PW-X motor, with one extra mode that boosts the torque to 80Nm at the highest setting, making it similar to their hardtail eMTB, the YDX Torx. They instead decided to go with the PWSeries SE, the same as on the rest of their line. Yamaha’s proven compact display offers easy-to-read information, and lights up the top in different colors based on the power level chosen. We asked them why they don’t put a 28-mph, Class 3 motor on a drop-bar bike. Their answer was simple and responsible—since the Wabash is meant to go off-road, they wanted to keep it as a Class 1 bike to keep it legal for street and trails. This makes perfect sense, and the hand-off from pedal assist at around 20 mph is so gradual, you barely notice it. “Our over-exuberance was met with some sketchy moments, but that’s what happens on an e-bike!” The motor offers instant torque—from zero rpm up to a maximum of 70 N/m and at a cadence of up to 110 rpm. There are four levels of assist: Eco+, which essentially overcomes the extra weight of the battery and motor; Eco, which offers a bit more power; Standard, which was our mode of choice for all but the steeper ascents; and High. Integrated LED light in front is included. It is enough to be seen but not necessarily to see off-road at night. The bike comes with Yamaha’s one and only display. It’s in a rugged case and mounted in front of the stem so you don’t have to look too far down to see it. The controller is behind the bars on the left side, near the stem. It’s a neat configuration, for sure, but you have to sit upright to reach it. The world’s smallest bike bell is directly opposite it, also with the same reason to sit upright. The 500-Wh battery gave us enough range for several rides before needing to recharge it. We rarely used Eco and only used Eco+ to find out if it was any fun. It wasn’t. We’d love to see an integrated battery on future Yamaha bikes. It seems there’s a natural progression toward this, and it really improves the look of the bike. WHO IT’S MADE FOR This bike is designed for commuters who want to ride flats in their suit on the way to the office, then switch to their cycling shoes, flip the pedals over, clip in and find fun dirt paths on the way home. As drop-bar bikes go, it’s a relatively inexpensive and capable bike for some light off-roading. THE RIDE We used the Wabash for both paved and unpaved expeditions. On the road there’s plenty of gearing even for steep hills. The aggressive rider position makes you want to go faster. We’re big fans of fingers always on brakes, so we mostly rode with our palms resting on the Apex brake hoods. The single shifter for the rear derailleur controls up- or downshifting. This may be the world’s tiniest bike bell. It was actually useful to alert others we were coming. The relatively narrow tires translated bumps pretty harshly through the unforgiving aluminum frame and fork. We almost got stuck in a few grooves on the street, which is something commuters might consider. If you have horribly maintained roads, you might want to think about running wider tires. We loved the smooth transition between power assist and no assist, we could accelerate from stops, never having to roll through to carry momentum. Above 20 mph it’s all the strength of the rider, and this bike’s pretty easy to keep up there. Controls were well-placed overall. Most of the time we had to change position to ring the little bell or change power mode, neither of which we did much. Whistling was easier than the bell in traffic. When we hit the dirt, the bike provided more fun than we expected. There aren’t a lot of options for gravel bikes in the e-bike world, so this was a treat! It’s definitely a different experience than that of even a front-suspension mountain bike. Plenty of energy is transferred to the rider, especially from the front end, over rocks and bumps. We did like the padded cork tape on the bars. That did actually help smooth out the bumps. Yamaha went for an off-road saddle with chromoly rails. It was comfortable, even on longer rides. The 42t large rear cog and the power-assist turned up to High was just enough to climb most steep inclines, but lacking any suspension made getting through rutted sections troublesome. A fully SRAM Apex 1 drivetrain shifted perfectly and provided an excellent gear range. Descending on the Yamaha was a blast. It was nimble, and that was a good thing. On all the off-camber corners, even with all the loose rocks and dirt, the tires bit, never sliding once. The one time we did skid was the usual skid test to make sure the rear wheel can lock up, even while we’re sitting on the saddle. Modulation kept that at a minimum. THE VERDICT If we had one complaint, it would be that Yamaha really needs to update the form and function of their e-bikes. The Wabash, while a good performer, does have the look and feel of a bike from 2017. Being that they are as large a company as they are with a vaunted history of turning out incredibly designed motorcycles, we have higher expectations of what Yamaha could deliver. The Wabash looks dated as it lines up next to the competition, many of which now feature integrated batteries. Overall, this is a really fun bike to ride, and it does love to go off-road. It feels as natural in either environment. The great thing about drop bar bikes is the variety of riding positions it offers. It would definitely be a fun commuter, especially if there’s a dirt shortcut along the way. There’s a lot of value for the price, especially with the level of components. SPECS YAMAHA WABASH MSRP: $3500 Motor: Yamaha PWSeries SE Battery: Yamaha 500 Wh, 36V lithium-ion Charge time: 4 hours Top speed: 20 mph (with assist) Range: 30–50 miles (tested) Drive: SRAM Apex 1 Brakes: SRAM Apex hydraulic, 160mm rotors Controls: Yamaha Fork: One-piece aluminum, 12x100mm thru-axle, fender compatible, internal brake hose routing Frame: Yamaha hydroformed aluminum Tires: Maxxis Speed Terrane, 700x33c TR EXO Weight: 42.3 lbs. (large) Color choice: Latte Sizes: S/M/L www.yamahabicycles.com   THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post Bike Review: YAMAHA WABASH appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
8pts
08/07/2019