4 - 11/02/2020 08:34:14

The Heckler hasn’t featured in Santa Cruz’s portfolio since 2016. Now the bike is back as an eMTB with a Shimano motor as well as a revamped look and suspension design to slot in nicely with the rest of Santa Cruz’s portfolio. Santa Cruz Heckler | Shimano STEPS E8000/504 Wh | 160/150 mm (v/h) | ab 7.499 € | manufacturer’s website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The party is already in full swing when the door slams open, a new guest enters the room and immediately storms the dance floor. In the world of eMTBs, that is the Santa Cruz Heckler. The iconic Californian MTB brand is finally joining the party. Regarding looks, the bike slots perfectly into the American brand’s lineup. The Heckler is powered by a complete Shimano system with the STEPS E8000 motor and an integrated but removable 504 Wh battery. A lot of current eMTBs have more capacity, but Santa Cruz deliberately chose to rely on Shimano’s complete system to guarantee the best possible after-sales service worldwide. The Heckler is powered by a complete Shimano system with the STEPS E8000 motor and an integrated but removable 504 Wh battery According to Santa Cruz, the kinematics of the rear suspension have been specially tuned to suit eMTB demands. The Americans rely on carbon for the frame material, using the high-quality CC fibres that we’ve already come to know on their high-end analogue mountain bikes. The choice of wheel size is unusual for a modern eMTB – instead of mixed wheels or 29ers, the Heckler rolls on 27.5” wheels front and rear, fitted with 2.6” wide MAXXIS tires. As with the rest of Santa Cruz’s lineup, the Heckler also features their proprietary lower link suspension platform A lifetime guarantee on the bearings and frame gives prospective buyers added peace of mind The specially developed handlebar has ports for internally routed display and remote cables, keeping the cockpit nice and clean Santa Cruz’s unmotorised bikes are known for being extremely quiet! Thanks to the large ribbed chainstay protector, the Heckler shouldn’t be an exception Santa Cruz attach the magnet for the speed sensor to the brake rotor. This way it can’t twist and you won’t lose it as easily – great! Unlike the Megatower or Hightower, you won’t find a flip chip on the Heckler As you’d expect from Santa Cruz, the bike looks well thought out with high-quality workmanship and lots of attention to detail. Be it the big chainstay protector, the way the rear linkage is bolted to the front triangle or the positioning of the charging socket and the on/off button above the motor. Santa Cruz have also developed their own 35 mm handlebar with ports to route the Shimano Steps cables internally and keep the cockpit looking neat and tidy. With a lifetime guarantee on the frame and the bearings, Santa Cruz continue to back their premium status with the Heckler. The geometry of the Santa Cruz Heckler eMTB Regarding geometry, you can see that Santa Cruz have prioritised maximum trail performance. The 465 mm reach in size L is well dimensioned, the head angle is rather slack at 65.5° and the 76° seat tube angle is neither particularly steep nor too slack. At 445 mm, the chainstay length is just about average too, and with 165 mm cranks, the bike should offer enough ground clearance for technical climbs. What’s striking is the rather long 135 mm head tube, which should make you feel comfortably integrated with the bike even on steep descents. Thanks to the 430 mm seat tube, there’s plenty of room for long dropper posts, giving you maximum freedom of movement as well as allowing you to choose between at least two frame sizes to suit your riding style and bodily proportions. Size S M L XL XXL Seat tube 390 405 430 460 500 Top tube 572 mm 595 mm 619 mm 650 mm 682 mm Head tube 110 mm 120 mm 135 mm 150 mm 175 mm Head angle 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° Seat angle 76.2° 76.1° 76.0° 75.9° 75.4° Chaninstays 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm BB Drop 13 mm 13 mm 13 mm 13 mm 13 mm Wheelbase 1187 mm 1211 mm 1237 mm 1268 mm 1304 mm Reach 425 mm 445 mm 465 mm 490 mm 515 mm Stack 597 mm 606 mm 620 mm 634 mm 655 mm The various Heckler models Santa Cruz are offering the Heckler a total of four builds. The € 7,499 Santa Cruz Heckler CC R 27.5 is their entry-level model. For the flagship Heckler XX1 AXS RSV featuring SRAM’s wireless drivetrain, you’ll have to fork out a whopping € 13,399. All models are built up around the same high-quality CC carbon frame, as well as Shimano’s STEPS E8000 motor and compact E7000 remote. Santa Cruz rely on the E7000 display for the less expensive R and S models whereas the two higher-end builds come with the E8000 colour display. On the trail, we prefer the more compact E7000 display and, unlike the expensive colour version, it’s compatible with the eTUBE ride app. The E8000 display on the high-end models seems like a downgrade to us, besides the fact that it’s colour. Unfortunately, the Santa Cruz Di2 handlebar isn’t available on their most affordable model. On a more positive note, Santa Cruz have specced powerful four-piston brakes across the range. The two top-end models come with Santa Cruz’s Reserve carbon wheels, and for maximum durability, they’ve opted to go with their robust downhill rim on the rear. Unfortunately, they haven’t given as much thought to the tires. Although the MAXXIS Minion DHR II tires on the front and rear offer plenty of grip, we would have liked the DoubleDown version on the rear. Experience has shown that the thin-walled EXO+ version doesn’t hold up to aggressive use. Santa Cruz Heckler CC XX1 AXS RSV 27.5 Santa Cruz Heckler CC XX1 AXS | € 13,399 Frame Carbon CC 27.5 150mm Travel VPP Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Select Ultimate Fork FOX 36-E Float Factory, 160mm, 27.5″ Brakes SRAM Code RSC Drivetrain SRAM XX1 Eagle AXS, 12spd Battery Shimano 504Wh Integrated Motor Shimano DU-E8000 Display Shimano Display Unit E8000 Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth Handlebar Santa Cruz Di2 Carbon, 25mm rise Stem i9 A35 Rims Santa Cruz Reserve 30 V2 27.5″ Carbon Rims Hubs i9 Hydra Tires Maxxis Minion DHR II, 27.5×2.6 EXO+ TR Price € 13,399 Santa Cruz Heckler CC X01 RSV 27.5 Santa Cruz Heckler CC X01 | € 11,199 Frame Carbon CC 27.5 150mm Travel VPP Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Select Ultimate Fork FOX 36-E Float Performance Elite, 160mm, 27.5″ Brakes SRAM Code RSC Drivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle, 12 spd Battery Shimano 504Wh Integrated Motor Shimano DU-E8000 Display Shimano Display Unit E8000 Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth Handlebar Santa Cruz Di2 Carbon, 25mm rise Stem Race Face Aeffect R Rims Santa Cruz Reserve 30 V2 27.5″ Carbon Rims Hubs DT Swiss 350 Tires Maxxis Minion DHR II, 27.5×2.6 EXO+ TR Price € 11,199 Santa Cruz Heckler CC S 27.5 Santa Cruz Heckler CC S | € 8,599 Frame Carbon CC 27.5 150mm Travel VPP Shock Rear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ Fork FOX 36-E Float Performance, 160mm, 27.5″ Brakes SRAM Code R Drivetrain SRAM GX Eagle, 12spd Battery Shimano 504Wh Integrated Motor Shimano DU-E8000 Display Shimano Display Unit E7000 Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth Handlebar Santa Cruz Di2 Carbon, 25mm rise Stem Race Face Aeffect R Rims RaceFace ARC HD 30 27.5″ Rims Hubs DT Swiss 370 Tires Maxxis Minion DHR II, 27.5×2.6 EXO+ TR Price € 8,599 Santa Cruz Heckler CC R 27.5 Santa Cruz Heckler CC R | € 7,499 Frame Carbon CC 27.5 150mm Travel VPP Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Select Fork RockShox Yari RC, 160mm, 27.5″ Brakes SRAM Guide RE Drivetrain SRAM NX Eagle, 12spd Battery Shimano 504Wh Integrated Motor Shimano DU-E8000 Display Shimano Display Unit E7000 Seatpost Race Face Aeffect, 31.6 Handlebar Race Face Aeffect R Stem Race Race Face Ride Rims WTB ST i29 TCS 2.0 27.5″ Rims Hubs SRAM MTH 746 Tires Maxxis Minion DHR II, 27.5×2.6 EXO+ TR Price € 7,499 The battery capacity of 504 Wh is far from class-leading, but Shimano don’t have a larger battery currently on offer. The compact E7000-Remote is easy to use and allows you to keep the position of the dropper post lever nice and ergonomic The two most expensive models feature Reserve carbon wheels with a lifetime guarantee Our first impression of the Santa Cruz Heckler At first glance, the Santa Cruz Heckler looks like a successful eMTB debut. They haven’t reinvented the wheel in terms of motor and integration, but the new Heckler features all the smart details that Santa Cruz are known for. Ultimately, it all depends on how the bike performs on the trail and we’re excited to find out – considering the price, our expectations are equally high! For more information, visit santacruzbicycles.com Der Beitrag Santa Cruz Heckler 2020 announced – the American brand’s eMTB debut erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
6 - 11/02/2020 08:17:17

Santa Cruz, one of the world’s most lusted-after bike brands, has released its first electric bike. Some might say late, but Santa Cruz has done things its way, not following trends and putting out something for the sake of it. Santa Cruz Heckler X01 RSV first ride review It wasn’t until Santa Cruz’s founder, Rob Roskop, started riding e-bikes and enjoying them – and a push from team athletes – that Santa Cruz took a serious interest in making an e-bike. That’s not to say it was then a simple case of bolting on a battery and motor, the team has spent three years developing the reborn Heckler. “We really tested as much as we could, rode as much as we could, and we made sure it would ride as close to a Santa Cruz mountain bike as we could make it,” Todd Ford, Santa Cruz project manager, told us. Why the rebirth of the Heckler? Well, the original Heckler was released in 1996 and was designed to elevate the rider’s trail experience, and that’s just what Santa Cruz is aiming for with the new Heckler. Santa Cruz Heckler details The Heckler sports 150mm rear wheel travel, a 160mm fork and uses 27.5in wheels with 2.6in tyres. Max Schumann Santa Cruz’s first goal when setting out to make an e-bike was to build the most playful, agile and fun e-bike it could. Its second goal was to make the bike as clean and good looking as possible, without batteries, cables and clutter on show. Finally, the bike needed to be as reliable and serviceable as possible, in line with Santa Cruz’s lifetime warranty. Santa Cruz started by looking at which bikes in its current line-up had the qualities that were as closely related to what it wanted to achieve with the Heckler, and settled on the Bronson. One of its most popular bikes. So, the Heckler sports 150mm rear wheel travel, a 160mm fork and uses 27.5in wheels with 2.6in tyres. Santa Cruz has used its CC carbon frame on all models. Max Schumann For every model in the Heckler range, Santa Cruz has used its CC carbon frame, which uses a higher-grade fibre to achieve the same strength and stiffness as the cheaper C layup but for a lower weight. This CC construction is used for both the front and rear triangles, plus the battery cover. This keeps the bike as light as possible and helps with that playful feeling Santa Cruz wanted. The only metal in the frame is found in the battery mounts and threaded inserts for the drive unit. Santa Cruz was keen to keep any metal/carbon joints to a minimum to reduce the number of stress-rising junctions between the materials, which require overbuilding and add weight. Internal cable routing is used throughout and is accessible by removing the battery. Max Schumann The frame features internal cable routing, which is accessible by removing the battery, to keep the look as clean as possible. The Heckler is also the first bike from Santa Cruz made direct-mount 200 compatible – so you can’t run a smaller rear rotor than 200mm, but you can go up to 220mm. Santa Cruz has kept its hardware in the same style as its mountain bikes, including forged links, thru-axle designs and radial bearings for pivots. However, things have been ‘beefed’ up for the Heckler to increase chassis stiffness to accommodate the extra weight of the battery and motor. Santa Cruz has made an e-bike handlebar. Max Schumann While not strictly a frame detail, Santa Cruz has also made an e-bike handlebar. Because the mode switch uses a Di2 cable, a bar with a hole and groove was made to hide the cable inside, so there are no extra wires on show. This feature in on both sides, so if you wanted to run a Di2 shifter the wire for that can be hidden too. The Hecklers’ handlebar dimensions are the same as Santa Cruz’s other trail bar: 800mm wide, 35mm diameter, 9-degree backsweep and 5-degree up. A bar with a hole and groove was made to hide the cable. Max Schumann An extra feature on the two top models is the inclusion of the new Reserve 27.5in downhill rear wheel. It features 32 spokes with a 31mm internal width and is stiffer than the regular Reserve 30, which Santa Cruz specs on the front. Santa Cruz Reserve DH 27.5 rear wheel. Max Schumann SRAM announced all its Eagle products would be e-bike compatible at Sea Otter last year, and Santa Cruz is one of the first brands to take advantage of this. They’re neither using the 7-speed EX drivetrain nor the NX drivetrain (apart from on the lower-spec model) which don’t have the full 50-10t range, but are instead using these higher spec, e-bike specific drivetrains – GX, X01 and XX1 through the top three models – with the full range available. Maxxis DHR II 27.5 x 2.6 EXO+ tyres. Max Schumann Santa Cruz claims that even with the extra power from the motor, it works better when you have a higher cadence, so having this easier gear is the best way to get the most efficiency from the motor. The shifters are also single-shift only to make sure there’s minimal gear crunching when changing with the extra motor power. The shifters are single-shift only for minimal gear crunching. Max Schumann Santa Cruz Heckler motor and battery Santa Cruz chose the Shimano E8000 drive unit for all Heckler models after testing everything it could get its hands on: Bosch, Yamaha, Brose, for example. Santa Cruz pointed out how it liked the minimalist design of the displays and remotes on the Shimano unit and how accessible Shimano is worldwide; if you need a replacement, any Shimano dealer should be able to get it for you, and you don’t need to hunt down some obscure part. Shimano’s E8000 drive unit has a 250W output and 70Nm torque. Max Schumann The E8000 is currently Shimano’s top-of-the-line e-bike system and produces 250W output and 70Nm torque. Santa Cruz admitted some motors produce bigger numbers, but claimed it liked how the Shimano motor rides and its competitive weight at a claimed 2.8kg. Shimano’s E-8035 integrated battery with 504Wh capacity is used, which is completely removable with a 4mm Allen key. Santa Cruz chose a 504Wh battery because it believes that for most people, it will provide as much riding as they’ll want, without being too heavy to affect the bike’s overall weight, and thus handling. The battery can be removed using a 4mm Allen key. Max Schumann Unscrew… Max Schumann Drop the cover… Max Schumann Pull… Max Schumann and remove… Max Schumann There’s access to the internal cable routing once the battery’s been removed. Max Schumann At a claimed 2.9kg, Shimano’s E-8035 integrated battery with 504Wh capacity could be carried as a spare. Max Schumann Plus, Santa Cruz claims that at 2.9kg, it’s possible to carry a spare in a backpack for those riders who want extra range. For the displays, the two top models in the range get the E8000, which features a colour screen and graphic for the power output. The two lower models use the E7000, which is black and white, and a little smaller. All Heckler models use the E7000 mode switch, which is a subtle two-button remote that sits against the left-hand grip. For the displays, the two top models in the range get the colour E8000 screen while the others are specced with the black and white E7000. Max Schumann Both displays connect to Shimano’s E-TUBE Project app, available on both Apple and Android. The first thing it does when connected is run a diagnostics test and lets you know if any firmware updates are needed. It should also tell you the health of the battery, which after time will start to deteriorate, so you’ll know when you should look to replace it. These features are only available if you run a full Shimano system. Santa Cruz Heckler geometry details With the Bronson making the template for the Heckler, there are obvious similarities, but there are also a few changes because Santa Cruz developed this bike alongside its 29er range, including the Hightower. The head angle sports a trail-friendly 65.5 degrees, while the effective seat tube is a little steeper than the Bronson’s at 76.1 degrees in a size medium. To keep the bike as playful as possible, Santa Cruz made the chainstays as short as it could at 445mm, which spans all five sizes. The small size sports a 425mm reach while the XXL tops out at 515mm. Max Schumann The reach numbers are a touch longer than the Bronson, but 5mm shorter than the Hightower. Santa Cruz opted to do this because it believes you climb more seated when riding an e-bike, so a touch shorter reach is more comfortable. The small size sports a 425mm reach, which jumps up in 20mm increments up to the large. The XL and XXL get a 25mm increase that tops out at a massive 515mm. Seat tube lengths are sensible on the Heckler, which should allow most people to size up if they want to tame down the agile feeling of the bike for something more sure-footed. Santa Cruz Heckler suspension details Santa Cruz’s VPP suspension platform can be found on the Heckler. Max Schumann Santa Cruz has invested a lot of time and development into its VPP suspension platform, and it was essential that the Heckler rode as close to its traditional bikes as possible. So it’s no surprise that the Heckler uses the same suspension platform and keeps a very recognisable Santa Cruz silhouette. The Heckler uses its lower link suspension design but runs lower anti-squat than the Bronson. Santa Cruz wanted to keep the suspension as active as possible under seated pedalling to make sure the rear tyre has as much traction as possible. High anti-squat can cause the suspension to stiffen up and the wheel to skip, which loses contact with the ground and drive from the motor, which takes away the point of having the assistance. It has kept the leverage rate almost identical to its other bikes and this leverage rate provides mid-stoke support. Even with the lower anti-squat, Santa Cruz claims it doesn’t sit down and sag into the suspension and have a significant wallowing effect. It helps maintain the bike’s geometry for comfortable climbing. RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate rear shock. Max Schumann Using the full range of RockShox’ Super Deluxe rear shocks across the Heckler models, Santa Cruz has kept the shock tune very similar to the Bronson. After testing various configurations, it settled on what it already knew and thought was best. Upfront, Santa Cruz is running e-bike-tuned Fox 36 forks, which range from Performance to Performance Elite and then Factory models. The E-Tune means the forks use different stanchions and an adjusted rebound tune. The lowest spec bike comes with a RockShox Yari RC fork, which is already e-bike compatible. All forks are 160mm travel. All of the e-bike tuned and compatible forks have 160mm travel. Max Schumann Santa Cruz Heckler models and pricing First things first, the new Heckler should be available now. Santa Cruz is releasing four models of the new Heckler: the R, S, X01 RSV and XX1 AXS RSV. These come in two colours: Blackout, which is the same colour as last year’s Hightower but in a gloss finish, and a bolder Yellowjacket, which is a throwback to the first Bronson. The Blackout colourway is the same colour as last year’s Hightower, but in a gloss finish. Max Schumann Santa Cruz Heckler CC R The base model Heckler comes with a full CC carbon frame and Shimano’s E8000 motor and 504Wh battery. It features a RockShox Super Deluxe Select shock and Yari RC fork and uses a SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain and Guide RE brakes. It rolls on WTB ST i29 rims with SRAM hubs and DT Swiss competition spokes, which are fitted with Maxxis DHR II 27.5 x 2.6 EXO+ tyres. £6,699 / $7,399 / €7,499 Santa Cruz Heckler CC S The S model features the same frame and drive unit, but upgrades to a RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ shock and Fox 36 E-Float Performance fork. It also gets a SRAM GX drivetrain and Code R brakes. The tyres remain the same, but the wheels use RaceFace ARC HD 30 rims on DT Swiss 370 hubs and Competition spokes. It also get the RockShox Reverb dropper post. £7,699 / $8,399 / €8,599 The Yellowjacket colourway is a throwback to the first Bronson. Max Schumann Santa Cruz Heckler CC X01 RSV Again, the X01 RSV model uses the same frame and motor as the previous models, but the suspension jumps up to an Ultimate model rear shock and Performance Elite model fork. SRAM X01 decks out the gearing and top-of-the-line Code RSC brakes provide plenty of power for slowing down. This model uses a Santa Cruz Reserve DH 27.5 rear wheel and standard Reserve 30 front wheel. Tyres remain the same. £9,999 / $10,899 USD / €11,199 Santa Cruz Heckler CC XX1 AXS RSV This is the top-spec Heckler and comes dripping in premium parts. Once again, the frame and drive unit are the same as is the RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate rear shock, but now you get a Factory level fork. SRAM’s latest wireless electronic shifting AXS Eagle adds to the bling. The brakes are again Code RSCs, and it runs Santa Cruz’s Reserve wheels and uses the same Maxxis tyres. This model gets upgraded hubs to i9 Hydra models. £11,999 / $12,599 / €13,399

Posted by
Bike Radar
2 - 11/02/2020 08:17:16

It was only a matter of time until Santa Cruz jumped into the e-bike game. Interestingly, they’ve done so rather quietly, and to some surprise, have found a way to incorporate their latest “Lower Link VPP” suspension layout into the mix. From a design standpoint, that layout just doesn’t seem like it would play nice with a motor and a battery to contend with, but alas it has…surprisingly nicely as well. Anyhow, we got a chance to get some saddle time on the new Heckler, a bike that Santa Cruz hasn’t produced since 2013. With 27.5″ wheels and 160mm/150mm travel, it falls in line with a Bronson, but with pedal assist. Read on for our initial thoughts on the latest creation from the coastal Californian brand… Details 27.5″ wheels 160mm front travel / 150mm rear travel Lower link VPP suspension Boost hub spacing Metric shock spacing Shimano motor 504wh integrated battery CC carbon construction front and rear Lifetime warranty S-XXL sizing $10,899 Yep, it all fits! Santa Cruz chose a Shimano motor with a 504Wh battery and managed to keep the chainstay length down to a respectable 445mm – which strikes a nice balance between stability while climbing under power and maneuverability on the downhills. As for parts, the drivetrain is a combination of SRAM’s Eagle XO1 12-speed bits and Shimano Deore XT cranks in a 165mm length. A 160mm travel Fox 36 Performance Elite graced the front end of the bike in test here. High and low speed compression and rebound damping provide loads of options for tuning. Maxxis Minion DHR II tires are spec’d front and rear in a 2.6″ width. RockShox’ excellent Super Deluxe Ultimate rear shock is featured out back with externally adjustable low speed compression, rebound and a lockout switch. The shock has metric measurements and standard eyelets. The battery is easily removable and separated from the downtube via a single 4mm allen key. This exposes the cables and hoses routed through the frame as well. A full size water bottle fits no problem as well. Going huge! With e-bikes demanding brake power, Santa Cruz just went straight to a direct mount 200mm rear brake mount. No adapter necessary. SRAM Code RSCs with Centerline rotors get the job done. There is ample tire clearance even with a rather wide 2.6″ tire, and although a bit difficult to see, there is a roost guard for the rear shock, covered in…roost! Santa Cruz just announced the availability of their excellent Reserve rims in the DH version in 27.5″. The rims were previously available only in 29″…Well, now we might better understand the timing as the Heckler is spec’d with these rims, which are surely up to the task. Geometry With the exception of the longer 445mm chainstays, just about all of the geometry numbers are the same as a current Bronson. Amply long reach, a relatively slack head angle and a fairly steep seat angle leave the bike well balanced all around. Speaking of the Bronson, the suspension travel is identical. It is also extremely similar as well in terms of kinematics… On the trail To be completely honest, foolishly I sort of scoffed at the idea of Santa Cruz releasing their first e-bike with 27.5″ wheels instead of 29″. Being a bit late to the e-bike game, I thought it was a risky move. I walked that back pretty quickly after riding the bike though, and for more than a few reasons. Out of the gate, I was extremely impressed with the geometry and general temperament regarding the bike’s handling. Although I do think that most brands are soon going to stop putting any new developmental efforts into 27.5″ bikes, I do think that a well designed bike on that wheel size can, in some ways, handle better than the average 29″ bike. The Bronson is no exception – and so neither is the Heckler. In my experience, Santa Cruz can be touch and go with rear suspension. For example, the MegaTower is a great bike, but many consider its rear suspension to be a little bit difficult to set up and get “just right” where it doesn’t hang up a bit. On the other hand, the Bronson is known for having an appetite to just gobble everything up that lays in its path. Once I get into some of the rougher sections of my ride and started hitting square edge roots and braking bumps, I was floored with how well the Heckler handled them. It was not simply impressive for an e-bike, but any bike for that matter. It’s worth adding that somehow it managed to eat up everything in sight, while still having a penchant for pop. It was shockingly easy to boost and jump, all while having an incredible sense of calm. So in summary, this is a bike that handles well, gobbles up bumps without wallowing, jumps and corners nicely and feels really stable. Not bad! Lastly on general mannerisms, while the motor itself was relatively quiet, what stood out more than anything was that the bike didn’t rattle or make a racket. In fact, it didn’t make a peep – it’s eerily quiet, so hats off to Santa Cruz for that. As far as the electronic side of things are concerned, Santa Cruz played it safe and for good reason. Part of their rationale for going with Shimano is because of the excellent, broadly available support for their motors. The motto at the Santa Cruz is “no missed rides”, so reliability and service are their number one priority. While there are bigger batteries than 504 Wh out there, I was impressed with the general layout and performance. The ergonomics were dialed and minimalist on the adjuster that handled changes between the 3 modes (eco, trail & boost). They had a good spread and the motor’s power transfer was very smooth regardless of which one I was pedaling in. The display was also discrete, simple and out of harms way. As far as the rest of the parts are concerned, the specs very much mirror Santa Cruz’ choices on fully human powered bikes. Things like the Eagle drivetrain, Code brakes, Fox 36 and Reserve rims on DT hubs are parts that need no introduction and have all gone well beyond proving themselves. As far as the spread is concerned, the 4 available spec levels all pack a good punch and are available from $7,399 to $12,599 USD. While those prices aren’t cheap by any means, Santa Cruz is neither a budget brand, nor are they an over the top boutique brand when it comes to pricing. Overall At the end of day, Santa Cruz has made an impressive debut into the e-bike world. I was initially skeptical of what they were bringing to the table, but was humbled after a solid ride. While there are no shortage of overused buzzwords to describe mountain bikes and their attributes, I’d prefer to avoid them in this summary. At the end of the day, this bike was just straight up fun. Yes there are bikes with more power and/or more travel out there. Let’s say you’re looking for an e-bike that’s simply a blast, but something like a Specialized Kenevo is just way too much bike and perhaps a Levo is just too conservative – well, this is exactly what you’re after. For an e-bike, it’s way too poppy and easy to get off the ground, but will surprise you with how well it eats everything up. The truly silent nature is a huge bonus, and while it is a bit pricey, the parts choice is really good within each tier. www.santacruzbicycles.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
2 - 03/02/2020 00:00:55

With bushfires causing damage and closures to large parts of the Victorian High Country, they’re well and truly open for business, and it’s time to #RollOnBack and support the regions that need us. Here is the official word from Ride High Country: Victoria’s High Country has long been known by cyclists as one of the most well-rounded destinations for a cycling holiday. With Australia’s largest rail-trail network, seven mountain bike parks, the toughest road climbs in the country and more gravel grinding than you could ride in a lifetime, this part of Victoria has something for every cyclist, no matter their ability or preferred riding style. And did we mention the incredible scenery, a bevy of local producers of beer, wine, cider plus the regional produce and food it is top-notch. The High Country was devastated by bushfires that traversed the region. But whilst their key cycling towns including Bright, Beechworth, Mansfield, Mt Buller and Falls Creek have not been physically damaged the economic damage is unparalleled. Why not heed Ride High Country’s request to #RollOnBack and start planning a cycling holiday to this incredible pocket of Australia, which is home to the largest rail-trail network in the Southern Hemisphere. The extensive network covers close to 300kms of easy to ride cycle-specific paths with three signature rail trails to explore. Only the High Country Rail Trail has sustained physical damage. The longest continuous trail in Victoria at 134kms is The Great Victorian Rail Trail. From Tallarook through Yea to Mansfield, ride through the Cheviot Tunnel, explore the Trawool Valley and enjoy the stunning scenery on offer. The Murray to Mountains Rail Trail is Australia’s longest sealed rail trail and the High Country’s most popular. Winding through the stunning Ovens Valley from Wangaratta to Bright, it also has a number including offshoots to Beechworth, Wandiligong and around Rutherglen. The ‘M2M’, as the locals call it, passes right past cafes, cellar doors, breweries and local farm produce gates. The unaffected section of High Country Rail Trail runs for 44kms from Wodonga to Old Tallangatta hugging the shoreline of Lake Hume, crossing the spectacular Sandy Creek Bridge. Experience the High Country’s historic towns, gourmet food and wine, spectacular scenery and local events all by bike. Farmers markets, festivals and cycling events mean you will never be short of things to see and do when you Ride High Country. The post Bushfire Update | Roll on back to Victoria’s High Country appeared first on Flow Mountain Bike.

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
6 - 31/01/2020 11:34:18

Ragley is back for 2020 with a range of hardtail mountain bikes and gravel bikes for various budgets and intentions. The 2020 Ragley bike range features 11 chromoly and aluminium hardtail bikes including the classic and award-winning Blue Pig and two drop bar options. All the bikes come with a five-year warranty and lifetime crash replacement. The mountain bikes all feature Maxxis tyres in EXO+ guise, and dropper seatpost lengths are sensibly selected according to frame size. Frame-only options are also available for every bike. Ragley Blue Pig review 2020 mountain bike buyer’s guide Ragley 2020 range overview Marley 1.0 The Marley 1 has a dropper seatpost, SRAM SX parts and a 6061 aluminium alloy frame. Ragley Ragley says the Marley is made for “exploration, adventure and play” and that it is suited to riding in all sorts of terrain. The Marley 1.0 is favourably priced and features a Brand-X dropper seatpost. Frame: Ragley Marley, 6061 alloy Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 27.5in Fork: RockShox Sektor RL 130mm 46mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA Orbit 57E ZS Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, Black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley 50mm, +3 degrees Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: WTB Serra 32h Boost Tyres: 27.5 x 2.6in Minion DHF 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 27.5 x 2.6in Minion DHRII 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Chainset: SRAM SX Eagle 12-speed Boost DUB Cassette: SRAM SX Eagle 11-50t Shifter: SRAM SX Eagle Brakes: SRAM Level T 180mm F&R Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £1,299.99 Latest deals Marley 2.0 Ragley’s Marley is made for adventure and playtime, and its price makes it the most accessible of the range. Ragley The budget Marley 2.0 comes in just under £1,000, making it the joint-cheapest bike in the range. The Marley features 27.5in wheels and a 6061 aluminium alloy frame. Frame: Ragley Marley, 6061 alloy Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 27.5in Fork: RockShox Recon RL 130mm 46mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA Orbit 57E ZS Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, Black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley 50mm, +3° Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: WTB Serra 32h Boost Tyres: 27.5 x 2.60in Minion DHF 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 27.5 x 2.6in Minion DHRII 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Crankset: Suntour Zeron, 32t, 170mm, Boost Cassette: Sunrace CSMS2 10-speed 11-46t Shifter: Shimano Deore M6000 10-speed Brakes: Shimano MT400 180mm F&R Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Ragley 31.6 x 400mm Price: £999.99 Blue Pig Race The Blue Pig Race is the staple in Ragley’s range and it is the definition of hardcore hardtail. Ragley The constant in Ragley’s story since 2008, the Blue Pig is, according to Ragley, “at home on any terrain but happiest when ridden hard, roosting turns and hammering the descents”. It is the definition of hardcore hardtail and the latest version has Boost rear wheel spacing and tweaked geometry. The Race version is the higher-spec of the two models. Frame: Ragley Blue Pig, 4130 chromoly Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 27.5in Fork: RockShox Lyrik Select RC 160mm 46mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA NO.9 Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley Stubbing 50mm Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: DT Swiss M1900 Microspline Boost Tyres: 27.5 x 2.5in Maxxis Assegai 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 27.5 x 2.4in WT Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Chainset: Shimano SLX M7100 12-speed, 170mm, 32t Cassette: Shimano SLX M7100 12-speed, 10-51t Shifter: Shimano SLX M7100 12-speed Brakes: Shimano SLX M7120 four-pot, 203mm front, 180mm rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £2,199.99 Blue Pig The Blue Pig loves enduro, downhill and just about anything you can throw at it. Ragley The cheaper of the two Blue Pig models, but it still features solid components and the same 4130 chromoly frame as its pricier sibling. Frame: Ragley Blue Pig, 4130 chromoly Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 27.5in Fork: RockShox Yari RC 150mm, 46mm offset Boost Headset: FSA NO.9 Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley Stubbing 50mm Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: Sun Ringle Duroc 35 Comp Boost Tyres: 27.5 x 2.5in WT Minion DHF 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 27.5 x 2.4in WT Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Chainset: SRAM Descendant 170mm, 32t DUB Boost Cassette: SRAM NX Eagle 11-50t, 12-speed Shifter: SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed Brakes: SRAM Guide T 200mm front, 180mm rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £1,799.99 Big Wig Ragley’s Big Wig is a 29er that is made for all-round shredding. Ragley The sleek Big Wig is a 29in-wheeled bike constructed from 4130 chromoly. Ragley says it is at home on any terrain, “lapping round trail centres, epic backcountry adventures in the middle of nowhere, big alpine tours or even enduro racing”. Frame: Ragley Big Wig, 4130 chromoly Sizes: M, L, XL Wheel size: 29in Fork: RockShox Revelation 140mm, 51mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA NO.9 Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley Stubbing 50mm Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: Sun Ringle Duroc 35 Comp Boost Tyres: 29 x 2.5in WT Minion DHF 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 29 x 2.4in WT Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Chainset: SRAM Descendant 170mm, 30t DUB Boost Cassette: SRAM NX Eagle 11-50t, 12-speed Shifter: SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed Brakes: SRAM Guide T 180mm front and rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £1,799.99 Big Wig Race The Big Wig Race features a 4130 chromoly frame and higher-end parts than the standard model. Ragley The Race model of the Big Wig features 10mm extra fork travel on its RockShox Lyrik, as well as receiving Shimano SLX components. You’ll have to shell out an extra £400 for the upgrades. Frame: Ragley Big Wig, 4130 chromoly Sizes: M, L, XL Wheel size: 29in Fork: RockShox Lyrik 150mm, 51mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA NO.9 Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley Stubbing 50mm Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: DT Swiss M1900 Microspline Boost Tyres: 29 x 2.5in WT Assegai 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 29 x 2.4in WT Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Chainset: Shimano SLX M7100, 12-speed, 170mm, 30t Cassette: Shimano SLX 10-51t, 12-speed Shifter: Shimano SLX 12-speed Brakes: Shimano SLX M7120 four-pot 203mm front, 180mm rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £2,199.99 Big Al Ragley says the Big Al is a 29er to complement the 27.5in Marley bikes. Ragley The Big Al is a 29in alternative to the smaller-wheeled Marley bikes. That is to say, it is designed for all-round riding. Ragley says it is comfortable “anywhere from playing on local trails, lapping round trail centres or epic back country adventures in the middle of nowhere”. Frame: Ragley Big Al, 6061 alloy Sizes: M, L, XL Wheel size: 29in Fork: RockShox Recon RL 140mm, 51mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA Orbit 57E ZS Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley 50mm, +3 degrees Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: WTB Serra 32h Boost Tyres: Minion DHF 29 x 2.5in WT 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / Minion DHR II 29 x 2.4in WT 3C MaxxTerra EXO TR Crankset: Suntour Zeron, 30t, 170mm Cassette: Sunrace CSMS2 10-speed, 11-46t Shifter: Shimano Deore M6000 10-speed Brakes: Shimano MT400 180mm front and rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Ragley 31.6 x 400mm Price: £999.99 Piglet The Piglet is a trail version of the esteemed Blue Pig, made for singeltrack and all-mountain. Ragley Made for lighter use than the Blue Pig, the Piglet is a trail bike made for “exploration, adventure and play”, according to Ragley. The latest version has Boost rear wheel spacing, revised geometry and updated rear triangle “to give a little more comfort on those long rides but at the same time retain stiffness for power transfer”. Frame: Ragley Piglet, 4130 chromoly Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 27.5in Fork: RockShox Revelation RC 130mm, 46mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA NO.9 Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley Stubbing 50mm Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: Sun Ringle Duroc 35 Comp Boost Tyres: 27.5 x 2.6in Minion DHF 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 27.5 x 2.6in Minion DHR 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Crankset: SRAM NX Eagle 170mm, 32t Boost Cassette: SRAM NX Eagle 11-50t, 12-speed Shifter: SRAM NX Eagle 12-speed Brakes: SRAM Guide T 180mm front and rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £1,799.99 Mmmbop Ragley’s Mmmbop is aluminium and the company says it is enduro race friendly. Ragley The interestingly-named Mmmbop is a racier number made for flat-out all-mountain and enduro-style riding. Ragley says it was “designed for riders who want to go faster, jump bigger or play harder”. Frame: Ragley Mmmbop, 6061 alloy Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 27.5in Fork: RockShox Sektor RL 150mm, 46mm Offset Boost Headset: FSA Orbit 57E ZS Tapered Handlebar: Ragley Alloy Handlebar, black, 25mm, 780mm Stem: Ragley 50mm, +3 degrees Grips: Ragley Lock-On Wheels: WTB Serra 32h Boost Tyres: 27.5 x 2.5in WT Minion DHF 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR / 27.5 x 2.4in WT Minion DHR II 3C MaxxTerra EXO+ TR Crankset: SRAM SX Eagle 12-speed Boost DUB Cassette: SRAM SX Eagle 11-50t, 12-speed Shifter: SRAM SX Eagle 12-speed Brakes: SRAM Level T 180mm front and rear Saddle: Ragley Tracker Seatpost: Brand-X Ascend Price: £1,299 Trig Adventure Ragley’s Trig Adventure has all the necessary luggage mounts, plus a 4130 chromoly frame. Ragley Ragley’s adventure bike is aptly named the Trig. It has a 4130 chromoly frame and a carbon fork, making it “lightweight and supple enough to provide comfort on longer trail rides while robust and stiff enough to take some serious abuse”, according to Ragley. Wide 2.1in tyre clearance allows for a range of wheel setup options (it comes with beefy tyres on 700c wheels), and it, of course, features plenty of bottle cage and luggage mounts for your next big journey into the unknown. Frame: Ragley Trig, 4130 chromoly Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 700c Fork: Carbon Headset: FSA NO.9 Handlebar: Ragley 6061 Alloy 19in 420mm, 20/21.5/23in 440mm Stem: 6061 Alloy 19in 70mm, 20in 80mm, 21.5/23in 90mm Bar tape: Black Cork Cushion Wheels: WTB Serra, 12mm front, 142mm rear Tyres: Resolute 650 x 42mm TCS Light/Fast Rolling Tan Sidewall front and rear Crankset: SRAM Apex 1 XSync 40t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM 11-42t Shifter: SRAM Apex Long Cage Brakes: SRAM SB HRD APX 160mm front and rear Saddle: Ragley Brown Seatpost: Ragley 27.2 x 400mm Price: £1,499 Trig Gravel The Trig Gravel is made for blasting gravel roads and trails. Ragley Made for gravel riding, the Trig Gravel is built-up with lower-spec components than the Adventure model to help bring the price to a reasonable £1,299.99. Mechanical (not hydraulic) disc brakes is an area where costs are cut, but the Gravel still features the same 4130 chromoly frame and carbon fork. Frame: Ragley Trig, 4130 chromoly Sizes: S, M, L, XL Wheel size: 700c Headset: FSA NO.9 Handlebar: Ragley 6062 Alloy Stem: Ragley 6020 Alloy Bar tape: Black Cork Cushion Wheels: WTB Serra, 12mm front, 142mm rear Tyres: WTB Riddler 700 x 37c TCS Light/Fast Rolling front and rear` Crankset: FSA 19/20in – 170mm, 21.5/23in – 175mm Cassette: Shimano HG500 11-32t Shifter: Shimano Tiagra 4700 10-speed Brakes: TRP/Tektro Mechanical 160mm front and rear Saddle: Ragley Black Seatpost: Ragley 27.2 x 400mm Price: £1,199.99

Posted by
Bike Radar
6 - 28/01/2020 11:34:16

Essential during the winter and a smart addition to your bike during the summer, good quality lights for your bike ought to be one of the first accessories on your shopping list. It’s a legal requirement in the United Kingdom to have lights on your bike if you’re cycling after dark, but some riders like to use them during the day as well, especially during the winter, in order to increase visibility to other road users. Like everything, though, there are tons of different brands offering an endless array of options, so it can be a near impossible task to figure out which lights are most suitable for your needs. Best mountain bike lights 2020: 8 top-rated options for night riding Cheap bike lights: 6 affordable options for commuting in the dark Fortunately, here at BikeRadar, our expert testers have used and abused dozens of light sets to bring you the definitive list of what we believe are the best road and commuting light sets on the market in 2020. Road lights are split into another two categories: those that provide enough illumination to enable you to see what’s on the road and those that are designed to simply ensure that you’re seen by other road users. We’ve focussed on front lights that are more powerful and will enable you to see where you are going on unlit cycle paths or rural roads, while the rear lights are designed primarily to make you visible to other road users. Once you’ve browsed the reviews, don’t forget to check out our buyer’s guide to road and commuting lights at the bottom of the page. We’ve covered all of the key factors you should consider, including light output, battery life and more. It’s worth noting that most of the lights on this list are aimed at keeping you visible in urban areas or, providing they are adequately powered, riding on unlit roads. If you’re after lights for riding off-road on trails, you’ll need something with greater power and battery life. Check out our separate round-up of the best mountain bike lights. Best light sets for bikes If you know exactly what you want then you might wish to buy a front and rear light separately, but for many people the lure of a good quality light set that solves all your lighting problems in one fell swoop is hard to ignore. The risk with buying a set of lights, however, is that it’s easy to end up with one of the two (usually the rear) not quite cutting the mustard in comparison to the other, as manufacturers look to keep costs down in order to hit a certain price point. With that in mind, our expert testers have tested both lights that are sold as sets and also separate lights from the same manufacturers that can be purchased together at a similar overall price, with a budget of around £100. Cateye AMPP 800 front and Cateye Rapid X3 rear lights 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now (front light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Buy now (rear light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Cateye AMPP 800 front and Cateye Rapid X3 rear lights. Immediate Media Great performance and build quality Secure and versatile mounting systems 800 lumens front, 150 lumens rear at max power Cateye has a well earned reputation for making high performing, good quality lights in this category and the the AMPP 800 and Rapid X3 only serve to back this up. The AMPP 800 has a bright, wide beam and the rear light has a clever system that uses two separate LEDs that enable you to run the light flashing and constant at the same time. Run time at full power could be slightly better on both, but having larger batteries would naturally increase the size of the units, so it’s a bit of a trade off. The only slight negative is the relatively high price for the set, but they’re robust enough to provide good value in the long term. Click here to read the full review of the Cateye AMPP 800 front and Cateye Rapid X3 rear lights Lezyne Lite Drive 1000XL front and Lezyne KTV Pro Drive 75 rear lights 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Lezyne Lite Drive 1000XL front and Lezyne KTV Pro Drive 75 rear light. Immediate Media Versatile light set with excellent build quality Bright with excellent peripheral lighting 1,000 lumens front, 75 lumens rear at max power With 1,000 lumens at full power, Lezyne’s Lite Drive 1000XL provides more than enough brightness and beam spread for riding on unlit roads. You’ll only get around 80 minutes at this power, but dropping it down to the second highest output (which sits at 500 lumens) provides just under three hours of run time, which ought to be enough for even the longest of commutes. Its CNC-machined aluminium build quality is excellent too, and its IXP7 waterproof rating is very welcome. The tough, rubber band style mounting system makes adding/removing the lights a cinch, though they’re arguably a little less secure than ratcheted or bolt mounted options. The rear light puts out a slightly middling 75 lumens at full power, but does offer an impressive 270 degrees of visibility. Click here to read the full review of the Lezyne Lite Drive 1000XL front and Lezyne KTV Pro Drive 75 rear lights Latest deals Ravemen PR900 front and Ravemen TR20 rear lights 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now (front light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Buy now (rear light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Ravemen PR900 front and Ravemen TR20 rear lights. Immediate Media Great front light with novel design Remote control included in the price 900 lumens front, 20 lumens rear at max power The PR900 front light is the real star of this set, offering a novel, twin lens design and enough power to make it suitable for riding on unlit roads or even off-road. The 900-lumen setting is more of an emergency turbo boost mode, but battery life on the 800-lumen setting is excellent, providing just over two hours of run time. It even has a USB port to allow you to use it as a battery pack to charge other gadgets (such as your phone, for example). The rear light is sadly less impressive, packing only 20 lumens of light and a modest battery life. It’s simple and versatile, thanks to its decent mounting system, but there are brighter lights available at this price. Click here to read the full review of the Ravemen PR900 front and Ravemen TR20 rear lights Blackburn Dayblazer 800 front and 65 rear light set 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); A strong pairing if you like to run lights during the day. David Caudery / Immediate Media Tough and practical Well balanced set 800 lumens front, 65 lumens rear at max power Though the headline figures in terms of output and battery life might not win any competitions, in practice the Dayblazer 800 and 65 lights make for a very handy set of commuting lights. Run time at max power isn’t best in class, but there’s more than enough power on tap on both lights to handle road based commuting. Both have a hardy construction and come with a limited lifetime warranty, so they represent pretty good value too. Click here to read the full review of the Blackburn Dayblazer 800 front and 65 rear light set Latest deals Guee Sol 800+ and Guee Cob X light set 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now (front light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Buy now (rear light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Guee setup formed a very attractive pairing for commuting. David Caudery / Immediate Media Good value set Ambient light sensor helps maximise running time 800 lumens front, 25 lumens rear at max power The Sol 800+ front light might look a little inelegant, but it’s CNC-machined exterior hides some smart internals. Our tester found the battery met the claimed run times of two hours at max power and four at half power. There’s also a clever ambient light sensor, which modulates the light’s brightness, built in to the front light that can help to maximise the battery life when riding at dawn or dusk. The rear light only puts out 25 lumens, but does last for a full five hours even on steady output. Click here to read the full review of the Guee Sol 800+ and Guee Cob X light set Knog PWR Rider 450 and Blinder Mob V Four Eyes 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now (front light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Buy now (rear light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The body of the light is a tough aluminium affair. Immediate Media Good beam Power bank facility and customisation options 450 lumens front, 44 lumens rear at max power Always one to do things slightly differently that other brands, two of the key selling points with Knog’s PWR Rider 450 are that you can use the front light as a power bank for other electronics and you can customise the output modes via its ModeMaker app. This is great if, for example, you’re desperate to find that ideal balance between output and run time, but ultimately it’s unlikely to be a real game changer for most people. The design of both lights is also very neat, but coming in a smaller, more streamlined package does mean sacrificing a bit of battery life. The front light lasts around two hours at full power, but since it’s putting out 450 lumens that’s simply good rather than brilliant. The rear light feels brighter than its 44 lumens would suggest when blinking, making it a good option for urban riding. Click here to read the full review of the Knog PWR Rider 450 and Blinder Mob V Four Eyes Kryptonite Alley F-650 and Kryptonite R-50 Cob 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The single LED puts out a circular beam with a pure central bright spotlight. Immediate Media Tough construction Simple to use 650 lumens front, 50 rear lumens at max power It’s not the brightest light on the market, but the Allez F-650 boasts plenty of power and battery life for road and urban riding. Our test light lasted beyond the claimed two hours at max power, and was still putting out a decent amount of light a good half an hour later, though it did dim a bit. Peripheral visibility isn’t quite as good as some other lights on test, but build quality is excellent. Our tester even has a version of this light that’s still going strong two winters in. The ratchet style mounting system is also very effective, providing a secure and stable fit on all handlebars we tried it on. Our tester was less fond of the rear light, mainly due to its shortish battery life (just over two hours at full power), but it’s otherwise a perfectly capable rear light, if that’s not a deal breaker for you. Click here to read the full review of the Kryptonite Alley F-650 and Kryptonite R-50 Cob Latest deals Light & Motion Urban 900 Commuter Combo 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); One major feature of Light & Motion’s lights is that they’re certified to US FL-1 standards. David Caudery / Immediate Media Sturdy and waterproof Good peripheral lighting 900 lumens front, 60 lumens rear at max power Though a little on the pricey side, Light & Motion’s Urban 900 Commuter Combo does provide performance and build quality that’s good enough to just about justify this. Our tester got just over an hour and a half out of the front light on full power, which is decent considering its 900-lumen output, and dropping the power further obviously extends battery life. There’s no flashing mode, so the longest running time is limited to 12 hours in ‘SafePulse’ mode, but this isn’t likely to cause anyone major issues. The rear light puts out a decent 60 lumens, but is a little more plasticky than the front light (though it is also certified to US FL-1 standards). The mounting system for both lights is also a bit finicky, but all things considered it’s a good overall package, even if the price feels a little steep. Click here to read the full review of the Light & Motion Urban 900 Commuter Combo Latest deals Magicshine Allty 1000 front and Seemee 60 rear lights 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now (front light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Buy now (rear light) from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Magicshine Allty 1000 front and Seemee 60 rear light. Immediate Media Powerful and effective front light Well considered modes and decent running time 1,000 lumens front, 30 lumens rear at max power With 1,000 lumens, Magicshine’s Allty 1000 front light is nominally the brightest on test, and in real life it certainly doesn’t disappoint on this front – it’s got enough oomph to cope with anything the road can throw at you and even some off-road riding too. Even on full power, the Allty 1000 lasted just under two hours in testing, which was impressive, but the battery life unfortunately didn’t quite live up to the claimed four hours at the second highest setting (500 lumens). Its Garmin mount compatibility also opens up mounting options considerably, though our tester found there was a small, annoying amount of play in the mount included with our test unit. The Seemee 60 rear light is also a decent unit. Its main gimmick is a set of internal sensors that can discern when you’re slowing down suddenly and put out ‘a frenzy of flashes’ at an increased brightness, to warn other road users you’re slowing down. Click here to read the full review of the Magicshine Allty 1000 front and Seemee 60 rear lights Best front lights for bikes Gemini Titan 4000 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Gemini provides genuine daylight-style vision. BikeRadar Unparalleled strip LED illumination power Custom modes and a wireless switch Excellent reliability and the best way to light up your bike rides If you want rally car levels of illumination on your ride, nothing beats Gemini’s radical Titan. By using six LEDs in a horizontal strip you get a detailed 3D rendering of the road/trail rather than harsh single/double point shadows for genuine daylight-style vision. While it maxes out at a darkness-detonating 4,000 lumens, half that is enough for 90 per cent of situations, so the bag battery capacity is ample for epic rides. Each mode is programmable in 10 per cent steps and you get a wireless remote as standard. We’ve been using Titans for years without a glitch. Click here to read our full review of the Gemini Titan 4000 Latest deals Guee SOL 700 Plus 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Automatic power adjustment is a great feature. BikeRadar Automatic power adjustment Nice CNC machined body If you’re the sort of person who always forgets to dip their full beam (stop being that person), the automatically power adjusting Guee SOL 700 might be just the light for you. While this could sound a little gimmicky, in practice we’ve found the automatic adjustments to be quite useful, particularly while riding at dawn or dusk when street lighting can be a little patchy. The light also fixes onto GoPro mounts, opening up a whole host of potential mounting positions. Click here to read our full review of the Guee Sol 700 Plus Latest deals Knog PWR road 600 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The PWR system seems to be totally fuss-free. BikeRadar Genuinely innovative modular lighting solution Nicely constructed Knog’s modular PWR system was released to much fanfare. The whole system is based around a central power pack that is available in a number of different capacities, and Knog has plans to include camp lights, Bluetooth speakers and more as part of the PWR family. Knog’s new PWR is the Swiss Army Knife of power banks We’ve spent seven months testing the 600-lumen head unit and a medium (5,000mAh) battery and have found the PWR system to be totally fuss-free. The battery life is also pretty decent for a mid-powered light. As a new-ish product, we can’t speak for long-term reliability, but so far the light has been very hardwearing and we don’t expect any long-term issues. Click here to read our full review of the Knog PWR front 600 Latest deals Blackburn Dayblazer 800 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); With submersible waterproofing, it’ll survive even the wettest of rides. BikeRadar Multi-mounting options Bright and long running enough to be really versatile A tough and powerful light Blackburn’s slimline Dayblazer uses a combination of GoPro-style tabs and a rubber band strap to mount it almost anywhere, so no matter your handlebar configuration, you’re bound to find space for the light. You’ll be grateful for the 800-lumen ‘Blitz’ mode that can pick out trouble in the darkest alleys and gutters on any ride too. The TIR lens, with diffusing side cutouts, gives a good ‘see me’ spread, with flash and pulse modes for daylight running. There’s basic battery info and the 1.5-hour run time at max power can be USB recharged in four hours. It’s submersible waterproof too, so if you live somewhere with plenty of rainfall it’s sure to live up to Blackburn’s light reputation of being super tough. Latest deals Exposure Strada 1200 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Exposure’s Strada front light. BikeRadar Remote high/low beam switching Tunable output and plug-in extras It’s a well-designed, high-tech, high-performance UK illuminator Exposure has been making high-performance, high-tech lights in the UK for over a decade. The latest Strada road light is 300 lumens brighter than the previous model for uncompromised back road riding and a wired remote for flicking between high and low beams is included as standard. Run times for multiple programmable modes are communicated through a strip OLED. Plug-in batteries, rear lights and USB chargers are all available as extras and the latest version recharges 40 per cent quicker than before. The CNC-machined light, bar and stem mounts are beautiful and UK factory backup is excellent. Click here to read our full review of the Exposure Strada Latest deals Hope R2i LED Vision 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Hope’s R2i LED Vision. BikeRadar Super robust construction ‘Double barrel’ LED setup improves visibility The R2i LED Vision carries over Hope’s signature machined aesthetic, housing two eye-friendly, warm coloured LEDs in a very sturdy all-alloy body. The ‘double barrel’ setup of the LEDs causes a binocular-like effect that helps decipher what’s ahead, with the smooth transition at the edge of the beam avoiding stark reflections and sharp edges. The light is relatively heavy, but our experience shows that the weight penalty is worth it, with legendary reliability and factory-direct support to boot. Click here to read our full review of the Hope R2i LED Vision front light Latest deals Best rear bike lights Alpkit Tau 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Reasonably priced and top-performing. BikeRadar Mega-light 20g weight Long run time Renowned for its reasonably priced and top-performing kit, Alpkit’s Tau featherweight 20g light boasts a 20-lumen LED light strip with five modes, including high and low flash and constant and a pulse function. The light will run for 3 hours 30 minutes on full-whack and the light’s switch indicates the charge level. Latest deals Bontrager Flare R 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); There are multiple LEDs to project light in various directions. BikeRadar Good light projection Compatible with wireless controllers The 47g light can be fixed to your bike with an angled mount so that it can be positioned in the correct direction for optimal visibility. There are multiple LEDs to project light in various directions and it can be paired up to work in harmony with Bontrager front lights using a Transmitr wireless controller that costs an extra £44.99 – or you can use your Garmin device. At max output, the light can run for 4 hours 50 minutes. Click here to read the full review of the Bontrager Flare R Latest deals Topeak Redlite Aero 1W 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); It’s always ready to go and has never failed us out on a ride. BikeRadar 55-lumen max power setting Lots of mounting options On paper, Topeak’s Redlite Aero 1W is nothing remarkable, but it’s always the one that’s ready to go and has never failed us out on a ride. Four modes max-out at 55 lumens (two-hour run time) with a low battery indicator. Different back pieces and bands fit various shaped tubes/posts, the single LED strip is angled and it charges in two hours. Latest deals Bontrager Flare R City 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); In max setting it’ll keep on going for just over five hours. BikeRadar Quick charge time Lightweight and long-lasting The light’s single LED emits 35 lumens using a wide-angle reflector, and in its max setting, which is daylight-flash mode, it’ll keep on going for just over five hours. With a 2 hour charge time and a 26g weight, it’s a solid companion for both daytime and night time rides. Click here to read the full review of the Bontrager Flare R City Latest deals Cateye Rapid X2 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Twin LED strips scroll through six modes with a 50-lumen max. BikeRadar 180-degree visibility Two hour re-charge time Cateye started the LED rear light revolution and still rules in terms of reliability. Twin LED strips scroll through six modes with a 50-lumen max and 180-degree visibility. It’s aero seatpost-friendly, but a lack of angle correction is irritating. Its light 30g weight limits max run-time to one hour, but the two-hour recharge is useful for busy riders. Latest deals Exposure TraceR MK1 DayBright 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The light boasts a two-year warranty and the metal body means it only weighs 49g. BikeRadar High 75-lumen output Six modes With the option to change between three constant modes and three pulsing modes to get the most from the battery’s output, you can expect the light to last around 3 hours 10 minutes on the maximum 75-lumen output. The light boasts a two-year warranty and the metal body means it only weighs 49g. It’s also built in the UK. Latest deals Exposure Tracer ReAKT+ Peloton 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The 75-lumen max light, with three-hour runtime, is very visible. BikeRadar It doesn’t require much space to mount Brightens when you brake in high-light situations Luckily for those with lots of clutter or not much space, the TraceR’s mount doesn’t need much frame/seatpost space to fit. The 75-lumen max light, with 3-hour run time, is very visible, has six modes, low battery indicator and charges in four hours. ReAKT is a feature that brightens the light when braking or in bright traffic situations, while Peloton dims if it detects a light following you. Latest deals Knog Cobber Mid 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Cobber has good side-to-side illumination. Alex Evans Great side-on visibility Plenty of modes As its looks suggest, the main selling point of the Knog Cobber Mid rear light is side-on visibility, and it certainly doesn’t disappoint on this front. Run time on full power was slightly lower than claimed by Knog, but at 1 hour 40 minutes was nevertheless good for a 75-lumen rear light. There are a total of eight standard modes, but you can also use Knog’s Modemaker app to programme your own settings if you want something specific. Click here to read the full review of the Knog Cobber Mid Latest deals Lezyne Zecto Drive Max 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Eight modes max-out at a 250-lumen daylight flash. A max 250-lumen flash mode for daylight running Very reliable With a versatile clip mount for straps or tubes, plus a robust construction, the ZDM is a bikepacking winner. Eight modes max-out at a 250-lumen daylight flash (9-hour run time). It’s heavy (69g) and sideways visibility is limited. There’s no waterproof rating, but we’ve dropped and hosed it without issue. Latest deals Moon Comet X-Pro 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Moon’s output impressed us. Alex Evans Excellent visibility Lots of mounting options Easy to fit, with lots of mounting options (including a seat rail mount, which is very good at this price), the Comet X-Pro also impresses with its intense output at full power. Run time at full power was bang on the 1 hour 30 minutes claimed by Moon too, which is very good considering the amount of power on tap. Unfortunately, there’s no pulse mode and it’s a little fiddly to use on the move, but the X-Pro is otherwise a very useful rear light. Click here to read our full review of the Moon Comet X-Pro Latest deals What to look for when buying a road or commuter light set Lumens Lumens are the unit by which the total amount of light emitted from a source is measured. Consequently, the amount of lumens a light offers tends to be the headline specification as a larger number essentially promises that a light will be brighter. Cyclists riding in lit urban areas, who don’t need lights to illuminate the road ahead, may only need a unit with a few hundred lumens, but if you venture on to unlit roads of paths that’s unlikely to be enough so you’ll need something more powerful. For urban commuting, 200 lumens should be sufficient. We would suggest a front light with a minimum of 400 lumens for riding on unlit roads. Don’t be fooled into thinking that the lumen rating of a light is the only thing that matters, though. A super-bright light that only has enough battery power to put out that headline figure for half-an-hour isn’t likely to be particularly useful, especially if you’ll need to use the most powerful setting for extended periods. Make sure you check the claimed battery life at all of the various power levels to find the most suitable light for your style of riding. LEDs The filament bulb is thankfully a thing of the past. Virtually all of today’s high-end front lights have Cree LEDs, which offer better brightness, more versatility, less heat, have a longer life and are smaller. Most rear lights now use COB LEDs. COB stands for ‘chip on board’ – essentially multiple LED chips forming a single module. They produce less heat, are brighter and can come in a variety of colours. Battery life Unlike mountain bike lights, which often use dedicated external battery packs, lights for road bikes and commuting usually have internal batteries, so there’s always going to be a trade off between power, battery life and the size of the light. For example, a more powerful light, with a longer battery life will require a physically larger battery and will therefore increase the overall size of the unit. This isn’t necessarily a problem in itself, but many road cyclists won’t want something overly large to spoil the sleek looks of their road bike or clutter the handlebar. Likewise, some commuters will want lights that are small enough to be stuffed easily in a work bag. For others, especially those who ride on unlit roads or enjoy especially long rides and commutes, a larger light with more lumens and battery capacity will be essential. Balance and beam pattern When buying a set of lights, it’s also wise to consider the balance between the front and the rear. The front light will almost always have much more power because its role includes lighting dark roads and cycle paths. However, while the outright lumen count of most rear lights won’t come close to the front, the spec is just as important. A rear light’s main role is to help make you visible to other road users, so having decent brightness and battery life is essential because it needs to last the length of whatever ride you’re taking on while also being powerful enough for other road users to see it from a good distance. Some lights are now also marketed for daytime use, with the appropriate brightness and flash patterns to help keep you seen in bright sunshine and low light. Both front and rear lights should also balance range and peripheral lighting. A highly-focussed beam can be great for lighting the road in front of you for fast riding, but for the sake of both being able to spot hazards and to enable road users approaching from different angles to see you better, it’s important that some of it spreads into the periphery as well. Mount systems In an ideal world you would be able to have a mounting system that is perfectly simple, lightning quick to install and remove, totally secure and infinitely durable… But in reality there’s usually a bit of a compromise between those various characteristics. The simplest mounts use heavy-duty rubber bands and dedicated grooves on the light mount. These systems have the advantage of being extremely quick and easy to install and remove, and can usually be easily adjusted to different types and sizes of handlebar, seatposts, etc. On the other hand, it’s easy to lose these elastic bands when the lights aren’t mounted on the bike and they’re more susceptible to movement over rough ground. Given long-term use, they’re also more likely to degrade and eventually break than a solid mount. Solid plastic or metal mounting systems, which clip on to the handlebars and are secured with bolts, tend to offer much better security on bumpy roads as well as much greater long-term durability. Installing or removing these types of mounts can often be a much more involved process though, sometimes even requiring a specific tool (such as a small Allen key). Usually, manufacturers will look to mitigate this inconvenience by making the light separately removable from the actual mount itself (so, for example, you can quickly take the light unit with you after locking up your bike), but not every light offers this function, so it’s worth checking before you buy. Other features Waterproofing is important, particularly if you regularly ride in poor weather conditions. The IP Code is a measurement of protection against the ingress of water and dust. IP4 protects against splashing of water, while an IP7 product will survive immersion in water for 30 minutes. Otherwise, some front lights not only power their own LEDs but have USB ports that allow you to charge mobiles or GPS computers – particularly useful for long-distance riders.

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 24/01/2020 05:00:56

Peaty’s Products has been innovating and releasing handy new goods, backed by the legend himself; Steve Peat, winner of 17 World Cup DH races. We’ve been curious about the brand since Steve Peat announced the launch, and got our hands on some tubeless products to test out. Read on for more details. Specs – Valve Stems 42mm (tested) & 60mm lengths 11 Color Options Integrated valve core remover Applicable for valve holes up to 8mm diameter Lifetime repair or replace warranty $32 USD Retail We opted for the all black color-way, though as these valves are made in conjunction with Chris King, they can also be found in an array of anodized colors. We were impressed with the attention given to even the most minute detail. The valve cap / core removal tool works very well, and fits snugly in the hand. The larger than average lock ring that keeps the valve in place is easier to thread tight due to its surface area. To cap things off, the Peaty’s tubeless valves are backed by an impressive warranty that states: “If you manage to break, snap, bend or crack our valves then we’ll fix or replace them free of charge!”. Specs – Tubeless Sealant Manufactured in the UK Ammonia-free, Non-hazardous, Latex-based Filling guide printed on bottle BioGlitter fills larger holes $30 USD Retail We were huge fans of the easy fill lines printed on the side of the bottle. No measuring cups required, simply empty straight into the tire. Included for reference on the back of the bottle is recommended usage amounts based on tire size. The bottle is re-sealable for storage. Perhaps the most notable feature of Peaty’s tubeless sealant is the incorporated ” BioGlitter ‘, a” special form of cellulose from hardwoods, primarily eucalyptus sourced from responsibly managed and certified plantations operating to PEFC standards. Peaty’s rationale behind incorporating the glitter is that it “works like platelets in your blood, building up behind holes to help our fast acting sealant form an even stronger bond with the rubber in your tire”. A closer look at the ‘BioGlitter’, it sure makes your tire look more shiny! Too bad it’s hidden inside for only you to know about. Below is a video of our attempt to puncture a 2mm hole in our tire in an attempt to watch the glitter do its magic. Overall As advertised, the BioGlitter quickly stops up the flow of air when the tire is punctured. We lost only a few PSI in the time it took to create a hole, and to spin the wheel to distribute the sealant around the inside of the tire. The ease of use when it comes to filling a tire with sealant, and the functionality of the BioGlitter has us pretty well convinced. Precision machined valve stems with an included tool, a plethora of color options, and reasonable price, make Peaty’s Products a top choice for setup of with your tubeless tires. More tubeless products (ie Rim Tape) and information can be found here: Peaty’s Products    

Posted by
MTB-Mag
6 - 21/01/2020 15:34:15

This month, find out how four hard-hitting electric mountain bikes stack up against each other, get the low down from all-time ultimate racer Nino Schurter, plus discover how good the riding is at Cwmcarn in Wales and Seathwaite in the Lake District. Plus, the team catch up with mountain biking’s loudest voice Rob Warner and Belgium’s finest Martin Maes, and there’s also expert advice from performance coaches Alan Milway and Chris Kilmurray, as well as mountain bike queen Tracy Moseley. The team’s new 2020 long-term rides get their first outings too, and there are loads more product and bike reviews for you to enjoy. Hard-hitting e-bikes E-bikes aren’t cheap, but these four from Canyon, Specialized, YT and Vitus pack a punch for less than five-grand. Grab a mag to find out which one wins over the MBUK team as they put them through their paces. Four sub-£5,000 e-bikes get thrashed to see which of these hard-hitters delivers the knock-out blow. Dropper posts put to the test Dropper posts are one of the most brilliant developments in mountain biking and plenty of brands are throwing their gloves into the dropper post ring. MBUK tests ten of the top contenders to see which one elevates itself above the rest. Dropper posts are one of the most important features of a modern mountain bike. Finding Nino Should you meet your heroes? MBUK staff writer Luke finds out with a once in a lifetime opportunity to ride and chat with Olympic, world and world cup champion Nino Schurter. Discover how Nino got started in mountain biking, what keeps him going and how strict an Olympian has to be. The man, the legend. Nino Schurter is mountain biking’s most successful racer. 2020 long-term bike first rides The team introduce their new 2020 long-term test bikes. From trail-whippets to enduro sleds and e-bike beasts, find out what the team will be putting the miles on this year. MBUK‘s editor James gets to grips with his new 2020 long-term ride. Progression sessions Production editor Chris gets back to basics with the help of riding coach and EWS racer Joe Connell. See what Chris takes from the day to improve his fundamentals and whether these pro tips can iron out errors in your riding, too. MBUK‘s Chris gets his fundamental skills refined by EWS pro and coach Joe Connell. Cwmcarn and Seathwaite From the natural trails of the Lake District to Cwmcarn’s rugged trail centre, the team ride these two very different venues – which both offer rewards of their own – under the spotlight to show you what makes them great places to visit. Cwmcarn has been a riding destination for years and it’s still dishing out the goods. Free gift Never forget your essentials with this month’s gift. The MBUK utility strap will keep your gear secure and offer you peace of mind on the trail. Lights. tubes. tools. Keep the essentials secure and right where you need them with the MBUK utility strap. Subscription offer Subscribe to MBUK and save! Plus, get a Muc-Off cleaning bundle worth over £20! Subscribe to MBUK and save, and get a Muc-Off cleaning bundle worth over £20. Included in the bundle 1-litre bike cleaner Expanding sponge Wet lube, 120ml Why subscribe? Save 35% on each issue – only £23.36 every six issues Access to exclusive monthly offers and competitions Get a Muc-Off cleaning bundle Every issue is sent hot off the press and delivered straight to your door You’ll never miss an action-packed issue or supplement again

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 12/01/2020 16:51:15

THE WIZARD OF LITHIUM-ION Professor Jeff Dahn stands next to Ravi Kempaiah and the Watt Wagon bike at the 1/3-of-a-mile Scotia Speedworld track, where Ravi broke the 12- and 24-hour world records for distance ridden on an e-bike.   Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, has one of the largest and most advanced university laboratories in the world devoted to studies of all aspects of lithium-ion batteries. And at its helm sits Professor Jeff Dahn. If you use lithium-ion batteries, then you have been affected by his work. He’s been working with batteries since 1978, and he and his associates have helped make vast improvements in materials used to make lithium-ion batteries safer, more energy-dense and longer-lasting. Photo Courtesy of Tién Nguyěn He has been co-creator of many patents, including the invention of NMC, which stands for lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide. NMC is used as a positive electrode material in lithium-ion batteries, which is now used in at least 10 percent of all lithium-ion batteries. When Tesla announced their Gigafactory, he reached out to Tesla and formed the first university research partnership between Tesla and Dalhousie University. Time Magazine called Professor Dahn “Tesla’s New Weapon”. We sat down with Professor Dahn at a racetrack in Halifax where Ravi Kempaiah was attempting to break the Guinness World Records for distance on an e-bike. This is our exclusive interview with Professor Dahn, a remarkable and very affable man who is passionate about batteries, energy storage and how it will affect our environment and our future. MEET THE PROFESSOR EBA: Professor Dahn, tell us a bit about you and what you’re working on these days? Professor Dahn: I’m a Professor of Physics and a Professor of Chemistry at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and I work primarily on lithium-ion batteries. We have three main focuses: to make lithium-ion batteries cost less, to make them last longer and to improve their energy density. EBA: You’ve been working on this for a long time. When did you start working on lithium-ion batteries? PD: I started working actually on lithium batteries, which was before lithium-ion in 1978 as a graduate student. Lithium-ion, I would say, came into play around 1986 or so. People started doing research in the area and was commercialized in 1991 by Sony. EBA: What’s the current state of lithium-ion batteries? “I really believe that one of the biggest impediments to the mass adoption of electric vehicles is cost. You can improve energy density and so forth, but the bottom line is that you’ve got to get the cost down.” PD: Lithium-ion batteries are pretty amazing at the moment. They’re used in electric vehicles and grid energy storage, in your laptop, and pretty much any device. They’re quite amazing, you know. You can expect to get easily 1000 charge-discharge cycles out of a lithium-ion cell—even a relatively poor lithium-ion cell will last four to five years, so they’re really state of the art in rechargeable power sources. EBA: We’re out here with Ravi as he attempts to set a world record. What do you think about the technology in the bike he’s riding? PD: This is quite an amazing e-assist bike, with a titanium frame, a really robust gearing system and a fantastic motor. He has a battery pack that’s about double the energy that you would have in a typical e-assist bike. I’ve ridden e-assist bikes all over Europe, and they’re absolutely fantastic! It’s not like sitting on a bike and doing nothing; you’re biking more or less normally, but you’re going twice as fast, so during a day you can travel twice as far. Hills present no problem because you just ask for more assistance. They’re really an absolutely wonderful machine. EBA: With your grasp of chemistry, how do you think of what chemical would enhance what part of what type of battery? PD: In the lithium-ion battery, there’s really several things you have to think about when you’re trying to improve them. You have the negative-electrode material, the positive-electrode material and the electrolyte. These three things are the things that you try to work on to improve the cells, so if you have in mind, for example, increasing the energy density of the cell, then you’re looking at changes to the electrode materials. “The research community is looking to find the next big thing, beyond lithium-ion, but to be honest, at this moment, there’s no real clear thing out there that people can say, ‘That’s the next thing!’ At the moment, the bet remains on lithium-ion.” And if you’re looking at increasing the lifetime of the cell generally, then you are looking at changes to the electrolyte. The reason for that is that when a lithium-ion cell is degrading, it’s because of unwanted reactions between the electrolyte and the charged electrode materials, so you have to stabilize and hinder or prevent those reactions as much as possible. So, there’s these three things that you’re working on all the time—the positive, the negative and the electrolyte. EBA: What you think of the solid electrolytes? PD: The solid electrolyte is a system that could really improve the lifetime of cells and, in addition, it’s not a combustible system, so in principle, it can improve safety as well. I think it’s really important to continue working on solid-state batteries, and it’s happening all over the world. There are a lot of claims being made about solid-state batteries will be ready in a few years, and we’ll see what happens. I don’t know how close to this state of readiness it really is at this time. EBA: Where is better technology going right now? PD: I would say the next five years looks like a vast expansion in production capacity of lithium-ion to meet the demand of vehicles and grid. In the same time, the research community is looking to find the next big thing, beyond lithium-ion. But to be honest, at this moment, there’s no real clear thing out there that people can say, “That’s the next thing!” At the moment, the bet remains on lithium-ion. The kind of projections you see in the next five years it will at least double in terms of production capacity around the world. Maybe even more! EBA: Do you think energy storage capacity as well? PD: Oh, yeah! Energy storage is booming at the moment. You see announcements from the various companies about very large-scale energy storage systems, coupled with solar popping up all over the place. It’s just booming! DIFFERENT TECHNOLOGY EBA: What about technologies like aluminum-ion or graphene? Are those on the horizon? PD: The real interesting thing about an element like aluminum is, for every aluminum-ion you transfer from the positive electrode to the negative, you transport three electrons through the wire, so in principal it can give you a three-fold advantage over lithium, if you can make it work. The real issue with aluminum is that if you can find an electrode material that aluminum can diffuse rapidly through, like lithium can diffuse rapidly in graphite, or in positive electrode materials like NCA, which is in Ravi’s bike. The thing about aluminum is that it’s triply charged—three-plus. And it is very difficult for a triply-charged ion to diffuse rapidly in solids. It just polarizes the environment and makes bottlenecks that make it very difficult, so finding electrode materials that are functional for aluminum and other ions like magnesium that people have talked about are very difficult. I don’t know what will happen in that space. EBA: What about the amount of charge needed for something like a Tesla semi? To have a 500-mile range, that battery is massive. Won’t it take a long time to charge? PD: Well, the size of the battery doesn’t have much to do with its ability to charge rapidly. It’s all a question of having the available power. At this point in time, any lithium-ion battery can be charged in roughly half an hour. So, if you have a giant truck, and let’s just say it has a megawatt-hour battery in it, then you’d have to have 2 megawatts of power to charge it in half an hour. It’s all a question of having the right-size cord and plug available to provide the juice that you need. “In terms of energy density, I think you can probably get another 50 percent beyond lithium-ion. To go beyond that, you really need to get a new periodic table. We need new elements. We need new properties.” What a lot of people are talking about and wanting is the ability to be able to charge in a shorter amount of time. This is a situation where you can make some trade-offs in the lithium-ion cell to promote faster charging, but most of those trade-offs lead to a lower energy density, which means a bigger battery, so you have to sort of balance the speed of charging with the energy density that you require. EBA: Half an hour to charge a battery is reasonable. If you were doing a cross-country trip on a bike, stopping for a half-hour is completely reasonable. PD: Oh, yeah. I don’t think anybody think this bike of Ravi’s can go about 125 kilometers before it needs to be charged. If you don’t need water and to go to the bathroom after that amount of cycling, I mean, you’ll be happy to take a half-an-hour break! EBA: Is there a place for capacitors in all of this? PD: The real difference between capacitors and batteries is energy density. Even a super-capacitor might have an energy density of around 10 Wh per kilogram, whereas a lithium-ion battery these days is 250 Wh per kilogram, so the energy density is really low. The advantage of a capacitor is that it can really accommodate a very rapid delivery or storage of energy, so very high-power capability. The place you could see it that might make sense is in capturing regenerative braking, for example. Right now, lithium-ion batteries are very good at that. Maybe there would be some space for a capacitor, but I just don’t think the vehicle companies want to give up any volume for that type of thing. INTO THE FUTURE EBA: Do you have any thoughts on the distant future of battery technology? PD: I think that if you look at where lithium-ion is today, and you imagine what we could do. The best possible battery of all? In terms of energy density, I think you can probably get another 50 percent beyond lithium-ion. To go beyond that, you really need to get a new periodic table. We need new elements. We need new properties. Maybe people would say I’m a pessimist, but it is really difficult to imagine a system based on the periodic table we have today with massive energy density, a factor of more than one-and-a-half the best lithium-ion of today. EBA: This is what you are working on today. PD: Yeah. I work on mostly lithium-ion. Improving lifetime, increasing energy density, and lowering cost. We do have a project called “Beyond Lithium-Ion” with very high-density cells, but at the moment their lifetime is about one-tenth that of lithium-ion. They will have a place in some specialty markets, but not the big markets. I really believe that one of the biggest impediments to the mass adoption of electric vehicles is cost—the cost of the battery. I had a conversation with Martin Eberhard (one of the founders of Tesla) long ago, standing next to a Tesla Roadster. This was in 2009. Martin said, “Look, the batteries we have in this Roadster now, the thing goes 240 miles. It’s a comfortable car; it’s really awesome. The real issue is the cost. If the batteries cost one-fifth of what they do now, no one would drive a gas-powered car.” That conversation stuck with me. Martin’s message was that you can improve energy density and so forth, but the bottom line is that you’ve got to get the cost down. Then people are really going to jump in here. EBA: Is that going to improve as production goes up, like that from the Gigafactory? PD: A lot of it is associated with economies of scale, but it also comes back to the fundamental material costs associated with the cell. Ravi’s bike uses a positive-electrode material called NCA, which is lithium nickel cobalt aluminum oxide. Probably 80-percent nickel and about 15-percent cobalt in the positive electrode. Cobalt is expensive, so we have to get rid of the cobalt. This has been a big research focus for us recently, making materials with the same properties, but with no cobalt to help drive down the cost. Every little thing you can do, to nibble away here, nibble away there, and slowly you bring the cost down. EBA: If you compare prices of bike batteries over the past few years, the prices have come down. PD: Oh, yeah. There are some really nice graphs that chart historical data for costs and also make projections into the future. Cell costs below $100 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) are projected and pack costs around $130 per kWh are projected. EBA: Professor Dahn, thank you for taking the time to talk to us and answering our questions! PD: It’s really fun sitting out here in the sun watching Ravi go in circles! THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com The post THE WIZARD OF LITHIUM-ION appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
2 - 10/01/2020 14:17:16

Lighter than steel and stronger than aluminium, titanium has long been considered one of the best – and luxurious – metals for making a bicycle frame. While carbon fibre is clearly the material of choice for top racing frames, titanium is no slouch either when put to good use. Titanium might give up some weight compared to the best carbon frames, but the ride quality is excellent, with a renowned smoothness over rough ground. Beyond those enticing qualities, titanium also boasts excellent fatigue life, and thanks to its inherent corrosion resistance, can be left unpainted for a unique, elegant finish that will look as good in 25 years as it does now. Titanium does have a reputation for being expensive, and that’s not undeserved, but if the prospect of a titanium frame is appealing, it’s worth taking into account the complete life of a bike. If it lasts you the rest of your riding life, then the value proposition starts to look a lot better for titanium. We’ve rounded up five of the best titanium road bikes as reviewed by the BikeRadar team. The best titanium road bikes in 2020 Reilly T325: £3,798 Sabbath Mondays Child Mark II: £2,880 Dolan Titanium ADX Disc Ultegra: £2,402 Kinesis GTD: £4,000 Spa Cycles Elan: £2,180 Reilly T325 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Reilly T325 is a titanium bike with a racy edge. David Caudery / Immediate Media £3,798 (as pictured) Fun and fast Wonderful ride quality A bike for the person who wants one bike to race forever more, Reily’s T325 has a semi-compact frame for added stiffness and an aggressively short head-tube to help you get into a long and low position. It’s not quite as light as an equivalent carbon race bike, but unless you’re only riding hill climbs or a real weight weenie, you probably won’t notice this, so good is the ride quality. Reilly also offers a lifetime warranty on the frame. Read our full review of the Reilly T325 Latest deals Sabbath Mondays Child Mark II 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Sabbath Mondays Child Mark II will tackle out-of-the-saddle climbs with no problems. David Caudery / Immediate Media £2,880 (as pictured) Fast, efficient frame Quality wheels and groupset With its oversized head tube and bottom bracket, as well as a semi-compact frame design, Sabbath’s Mondays Child is stiff enough to race, with its confidence-inspiring geometry making it a particularly noteworthy descender. Its high-stiffness does mean a little sacrifice in ride comfort, but the smartly specced tubeless-ready wheels and tubeless Schwalbe Pro One tyres soften the ride enough for all-day comfort. The frame also comes with a lifetime warranty, so you needn’t worry about it lasting the distance either. Read our full review of the Sabbath Mondays Child Mark II Latest deals Dolan Titanium ADX Disc Ultegra 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Dolan has a reputation for producing value-packed bikes. Courtesy £2,402 (as pictured) Smooth riding frame with good value spec Clearance for chunky tyres Dolan has a well-earned reputation for producing good value bikes, and its Titanium ADX Disc is likely to only reinforce that. The smart-looking frame and Deda carbon fork come kitted out with Shimano’s excellent Ultegra groupset and a host of other quality components, all at a very reasonable price for a titanium bike. With its tall head tube (205mm on our tester’s 58.5cm test bike) it has a sportive-focussed geometry, but this is a bike designed to pamper you over long distance. Unless you have the flexibility of a professional road racer, you’ll likely appreciate the elevated position. You’ll also probably appreciate the generous tyre clearance – thanks to addition of disc brakes, the Dolan has clearance for up to 35mm tyres, so you can go big enough to smooth out rough roads or take on light gravel. Read our full review of the Dolan Titanium ADX Disc Ultegra Latest deals Kinesis GTD 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); An all-year, titanium mile-eater and bags of fun, too. David Caudery / Immediate Media £4,000 (as pictured) Lovely frame with great kit Plenty of customisation options available Though Kinesis is better known for its range of aluminium bikes, it has quietly offered a decent titanium road bike for a long time. The GTD name is an abbreviation of ‘Go The Distance’, which is just what it’s designed to do – this is an ultra-endurance, mile-munching machine. Its disc brake setup allows clearance for up to 34mm tyres, meaning you can comfortably fit big rubber, too. At £2,100 for the frameset alone it doesn’t come cheap, but built up with quality components it offers a brilliant package for audaxing, fast-touring and all-year round road riding. Read our full review of the Kinesis GTD Latest deals Spa Cycles Elan 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Ideal for just about any terrain: flat, rolling, climbing, descending… David Caudery / Immediate Media £2,180 (as pictured) Comfortable, do-anything bike Old-school style Spa Cycles has been catering to the needs of British touring cyclists for over 40 years, so the company knows a thing or two about what works for that type of riding. The Elan combines smart, old-school styling and features such as external cable routing and a threaded bottom bracket, with modern touches including disc brakes and decent tyre clearance, making for a reliable, do-anything bike that will serve you well for a very long time. The riding position is comfortably upright thanks to its tall-ish head tube, but our tester found the frame stiff enough to get moving when cranking it up in the drops. The 10-speed Shimano 105 drivetrain (complete with a triple chainset for a true blast from the past) that came on our test bike is a little dated, but it performed admirably and Spa Cycles nevertheless offers plenty of customisation options if it’s not to your taste. Read our full review of the Spa Cycles Elan Latest deals Also consider… Van Nicholas Yukon Disc 3.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Yukon Disc falls somewhere between a tourer and race bike. David Caudery / Immediate Media £3,911 (as pictured) Great handling High quality, customisable build Van Nicholas is a Dutch-based brand that has done more than its fair share to popularise titanium bikes – and for good reason. The Yukon Disc has a great frame that could be made to truly sing with a few different component choices (as on our test bike). At 9.67kg including full-length mudguards, it’s pretty lightweight for a touring bike, and its 34t x 34t bottom gear ought to be low enough to winch you up steep pitches. Likewise, there’s very little flex from the frame, making it an efficient climber. Curiously, though, the bike has clearance for up 35mm tyres, but our test rig came set up with 25mm Mavic tyres – not bad tyres by any stretch, but a little slim for something that’s designed to be an all-day mile muncher. An upgrade to something with more volume would likely make a significant difference because the bike we tested was a little firm at the rear end. Finally, the slightly dropped seatstays might not appeal to the purists, but it’s a modern design touch that differentiates the Yukon Disc from its peers. Read our full review of the Van Nicholas Yukon Disc Latest deals What to look for when buying a titanium bike Frame geometry Like any kind of bike, geometry plays a massive part in the way a titanium bike rides and handles, so you want to ensure the bike you purchase matches the type of riding you intend to do on it. Titanium bikes tend to be designed for long-distance riding, so the geometry will often be relatively relaxed, with a taller head tube, slacker angles and a longer wheelbase. The slacker steerer angles and longer wheelbase aid stability and give a slightly slower, more deliberate response to steering compared to a twitchy race bike. It also puts you in a more upright position, with less weight on your hands and less strain on your neck, shoulder and back muscles. You might have to sacrifice a little in aerodynamics, but over the course of a long ride across rough terrain the gains in comfort could pay dividends. If you want to race or have a more aggressive position on the bike, you’ll be looking for a frame with a shorter head tube, steeper angles and shorter chainstays. Versatility The advent of disc brakes for road bikes has not only been great for slowing you down, but has opened up the possibility for manufacturers to build in much greater tyre clearance to bikes. Subsequently, many titanium road bikes are now offering clearance for up to 35mm road tyres. This not only brings benefits in terms of comfort and potentially reduced rolling resistance, but it also has the potential to massively increase a bike’s versatility, moving firmly into gravel bike territory. This is ideal if, for example, you live in a country (like the United Kingdom, where BikeRadar is based) where the road quality generally varies from bad to appalling. Even if you prefer rim brakes, many modern rim brake calipers can accommodate up to 28mm tyres on wide rims, so it’s worth checking the frame and fork can handle that as well. Longevity A titanium bike is likely to cost a fair amount more than an equivalent carbon, aluminium or steel bike, simply because the nature of the material makes it more difficult to construct frames and parts from. Without going into too much detail, the machining, welding and finishing of titanium bikes are more labour-intensive processes that require specialist skills and equipment, compared to other frame building materials. All of this increases production costs and, inevitably, these costs are passed on to the consumer. However, where a titanium bike makes up for its initial cost is in longevity. It’s an extremely resilient material, meaning titanium bikes can take a lot of knocks and punishment without trouble. With that in mind, many manufacturers will offer a lifetime warranty on titanium frames to the original owner, giving you peace of mind that should you run into any production issues further down the line they’ll have you covered.

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