2 - 26/07/2019 07:17:28

If you live for the descents but like to get to the trailhead under your own steam, you need an Enduro bike. But how much does a good Enduro rig cost and what do you have to pay attention to before buying? We reviewed eight affordable bikes and learnt a lot in the process. Our readers often ask us “When are you finally going to compare affordable bikes?” with the publication of our high-end Enduro bike group test at the beginning of the year. So, after reviewing 11 Trail bikes for € 3,000 in the last issue of ENDURO, we now have 8 Enduro bikes under € 4,000. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The Enduro bikes in this group test For this group test, we wanted to compare the best affordable options for an Enduro bike. We deliberately kept the test field diverse, with everything from the Propain Spindrift with its plush 180 mm travel and 27.5″ wheels to the Specialized Stumpjumper Evo, which is more of a Trail than an Enduro bike in terms of travel. We weren’t only out to find a test winner, but above all, we wanted to learn from the process and create a buyers guide by explaining what you should look out for when buying an Enduro bike. Bike Price Weight Travel (f/r) Wheel size Canyon Strive CF 5.0 € 2,999 15.26 kg 160/150 mm 29″ FOCUS SAM 8.9 € 3,999 14.92 kg 170/170 mm 27,5″ Propain Spindrift Performance € 3,185 15.40 kg 180/180 mm 27,5″ RADON Swoop 9.0 € 2,999 14.50 kg 170/170 mm 29″ SCOTT Ransom 920 € 3,799 15.04 kg 170/170 mm 29″ Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Comp Alloy 29 € 3,499 15.22 kg 150/140 mm 29″ Trek Slash 8 € 2,999 14.18 kg 160/150 mm 29″ YT Capra 29 AL Comp € 2,999 15.48 kg 160/160 mm 29″ Canyon Strive CF 5.0 | € 2,999 | 160/150 mm (f/r) | 15.26 kg | 29″ FOCUS SAM 8.9 | € 3,999 | 170/170 mm (f/r) | 14.92 kg | 27,5″ Propain Spindrift Performance | € 3,185 | 180/180 mm | 15.40 kg | 27,5″ RADON Swoop 9.0 | € 2,999 | 170/170 mm (f/r) | 14.50 kg | 29″ SCOTT Ransom 920 | € 3,799 | 170/170 mm | 15.04 kg | 29″ Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Comp Alloy 29 | € 3,499 | 150/140 mm (f/r) | 15.22 kg | 29″ Trek Slash 8 | € 2,999 | 160/150 mm (f/r) | 14.18 kg | 29″ YT Capra 29 AL Comp | € 2,999 | 160/160 mm (f/r) | 15.48 kg | 29″ € 4,000 – since when is that much money considered affordable for a bike? Admittedly, we weren’t too surprised when we looked at the prices of the bikes in this test – on average they cost € 3,309. The most affordable options are the Canyon Strive CF 5.0, the RADON SWOOP 9.0, the Trek Slash 8 and the YT CAPRA 29 AL Comp going for € 2,999 each. The most expensive bikes are the € 3,999 FOCUS SAM 8.9 and the € 3,799 SCOTT Ransom 920. You will undoubtedly find lower priced bikes on the market, but unless you’re willing to accept major compromises in performance, the options are very limited. Some brands didn’t want to give us their entry-level bikes for testing, and others couldn’t deliver in time. Why aren’t COMMENCAL, Bird or Nukeproof included in the test field? We invited all three brands to take part in this group test. COMMENCAL wasn’t interested and, unfortunately, Bird and Nukeproof couldn’t deliver a test bike on time. What to look out for on an affordable Enduro bike Before we go into more detail about the individual bikes, it’s good to consider what’s important on an Enduro bike in general. The press release of every modern Enduro bike contains the same phrase: it’s lower, longer, slacker, more efficient, and lighter. However, despite the spec being similar, all the bikes differ significantly in their handling. So, what should you pay attention to? Consider where and why you ride Do you want to compete in an Enduro race, do you spend most of your time riding manicured bike park tracks, or do you just want an all-rounder? Some of the bikes in this test field confine themselves to a niche and specific type of riding, while others are super versatile. Some bikes are very composed, like the YT CAPRA 29 AL Comp, which requires a lot of rider input in tight sections. Or there are bikes that are agile but quickly become nervous at higher speeds, like the FOCUS SAM 8.9. So, before you read the bikes’ individual reviews, think carefully about what it is you want. Do you prefer manualling out of berms and popping off every lip and ledge, or do you like steamrolling through the gnarliest rock gardens? Where do you ride, how steep is the terrain and how important is climbing capability? Suspension is essential With the announcement of every new bike, you’ll see the forum nerds discuss the geometry. However, what you rarely read about is the performance of the rear suspension. After all, suspension kinematics aren’t all that easy to understand just by reading a sheet of paper. However, the rear suspension design often has the greatest influence on a bike’s handling. If it wallows, the bike feels sluggish and lifeless, if it doesn’t respond sensitively enough, it feels nervous. The perfect rear suspension is sensitive without absorbing too much of the rider’s input, offering good mid-stroke support while not being overwhelmed by fast, hard hits. This group test has proven to us that good rear suspension with only 150 mm travel can be more capable than an inefficient linkage offering 170 mm travel. In other words, it’s a bad idea to choose your next bike based solely on a number on your screen. How much does a good Enduro bike weigh? Or should we ask, how much is a good Enduro bike allowed to weigh? You’ll often find that a heavier Enduro bike is actually the better investment because weight savings on crucial components such as tires or brakes come with a big drawback in performance. Despite having the correct air pressure in our tires (1.8 / 2.0 bar), we punctured seven times during testing because of flimsy casings. If you calculate about € 50 per tire, replacements can quickly add up. We don’t recommend saving weight and sacrificing performance on components as important as the brakes either. The lightest bike in the test field, the Trek Slash (14.18 kg), and the heaviest, the YT CAPRA (15.48 kg), are separated by 1.3 kg. If you were to fit the same tires on the Trek as are on the CAPRA, the difference would only be 776 g. If you then also subtract the additional weight of the CODE brakes and the longer travel fork, the remaining difference is negligible. Aluminium or carbon frame? The fear that carbon fibre frames break more easily in case of a crash or are less durable than aluminium frames is unfounded. Modern carbon frames are at least as durable as their aluminium counterparts. However, lower-end bikes often use lower-end fibres, which is why carbon bikes aren’t necessarily lighter. The biggest advantage of carbon fibre is freedom in bike design. However, YT, SCOTT and Trek prove that aluminium frames can look just as stunning. Bikes with carbon fibre frames are either more expensive or not as well specced, which is why carbon doesn’t have a lot going for it when you’re shopping on a budget. Party-Laps! Party laps! We put in back-to-back runs in the MTB ZONE Bikepark Geisskopf on all of the bikes to make direct comparisons! How important is the componentry spec on an Enduro bike? When you’re shopping for a new bike, you obviously also look at what components you’re getting for your money. We encountered some glaring differences in our test field – both with suspension and brakes. For example, RADON and YT spec a Performance Elite fork with the GRIP2 damper, while FOCUS and Canyon only stretch to a FOX 36 Rhythm. Similarly, in our test we had SRAM CODE RSC brakes competing against the lower spec SRAM Guide T. Of course, there are obvious differences in the performance of the individual components, but a bike’s handling is ultimately determined by the frame. After all, you can always upgrade the components afterwards – not so much the frame. In any case, the performance of entry-level components has become so good in recent years that we would prefer a 2019 NX drivetrain to a higher-end 1×11 drivetrain from 2016. Even the supposedly budget FOX 36 Rhythm has become super capable, outperforming some three-year-old high-end forks. Tops & Flops Often small details can make a huge difference: seamless integration, first-class ergonomics and carefully selected parts. Easier said than done – here are some of the tops and flops from this grouptest. Tops Top-notch!The FOX 36 Performance Elite fork on the YT and RADON delivers outstanding performance. It responds sensitively with very defined damping and can be fully tuned to your own preferences. However, setting it up requires a lot of time. Our tip: use as little compression damping as possible. The Best in TestThe rear suspension of the Canyon Strive responds sensitively to small hits, offering lots of mid-stroke support and plenty of progression. It provides traction without making the bike feel cumbersome – excellent! We like!The chainstay protector on the SCOTT is sufficiently long and soft. You won’t hear any chain slap here! Nicely sealedThe bearings of the Propain Spindrift are covered by an additional seal to protect them from dirt and water, giving you more riding time and less time in the workshop. Flops Too shortThe chainstay protectors on both the RADON and the Trek are clearly too short. The chain is loud and damages the paint. OverwhelmedUnfortunately, the SRAM Guide brakes don’t do justice to the Canyon, Trek and FOCUS. You can tease more braking power out of them with Trickstuff Power pads, but we recommend replacing them with better brakes as soon as you can. Painfully missedWhere do you put your water bottle? Unfortunately, there is no space for a bottle cage on the CAPRA. It’s annoying, especially on short, after work rides. SuperfluousInstead of having the option to lock out the fork on the SCOTT RANSOM, we would have preferred a compression adjuster to be able to tune it and make it a little more supportive. Where and how did we review the bikes? Besides riding the bikes on our home trails in the foothills of the Alps, we packed the bikes up and took six of our test riders to the MTB ZONE Bike Park Geisskopf to compare them head to head on the trails. We first rode each bike on the easy Flow Country track to dial everything in and then did back-to-back test runs on the Freeride Trail. We also put the bikes to the test on Evil Eye and the downhill track. By the time we were done, we had suffered seven punctures, a broken helmet and a few scrapes but we also learned a lot. The test team Christoph Bayer, 31, Editor-in-Chief ENDUROChristoph has been heading the tests at ENDURO for more than five years. As an all-rounder, he values well-balanced handling and good suspension. In his opinion, the best bike manages to combine opposing traits and performs well in every situation Finlay Anderson, 19, EditorFinlay is a newcomer to the ENDURO team. He currently lives in the Tweed Valley, the Scottish trail mecca. His riding style is fast and wild. Finlay loves to race, and also loves to see if he can rip the tires off his rims in the corners. For him, agile, fun handling is important, but not at the cost of high-speed stability. Andreas Maschke, 33, EditorFrom South America to the Dolomites, Andreas has done numerous bikepacking trips and knows all about long rides. For him, ride comfort, easy handling and reliability are crucial. Felix Gotzler, 25, Test RiderAs a racer, Felix is all about speed. Not only on the straights but in the corners too. The suspension has to be capable and swallow big hits but without excessively sagging under the rider’s input to make the bike as accurate as possible. Gregor Alf, 31, Test RiderIn his youth, Gregor was a professional BMX racer. Nowadays he is out to have fun and go fast. He likes efficient, agile bikes that are easy to hit big jumps with. Johannes Sturma, 26, Test RiderWhen you see him riding, you wouldn’t guess John’s only been doing it for three years. Unless he’s on his Enduro bike, you’ll regularly find him riding his downhill bike. For him, a bike has to carry good speed and offer a lot of reserves. The conclusion of our group test Besides all the fun we had on the extensive test sessions, this group test also gave us a lot of sleepless nights. When you review high-end bikes, there usually isn’t much for you to criticise in terms of spec, allowing you to concentrate on the bikes’ handling. For this group test, we had to compare very different Enduro bikes: we had perfectly specced options from RADON, Propain and YT going up against bikes with some significant weaknesses like the Trek or Canyon. At the same time, they had to compete against very expensive models like the FOCUS and the SCOTT. A points system would quickly have found a winner, but we didn’t want to make it that easy. After all, this is not about using arithmetic to declare a winner according to some rigid scheme, but to find an honest answer to these questions: Which bike would I choose and why? Which bike would I recommend to my closest friends? The answer: the Canyon Strive CF 5.0 – our Best in Test. Why does the Strive win in spite of its bad brakes and low-end spec? The answer is relatively simple: it’s the bike with the best handling by far. The geometry is absolutely spot on and the rear suspension is outstanding. The Canyon Strive CF 5.0 is a riot to ride on flow trails and flat sections without flinching at rougher, more demanding terrain. It strikes the perfect balance between agility and composure, both climbing and descending and it was the unanimous favourite of our testers. However, you’ll have to work a brake upgrade into your budget and since the brake hose is internally routed, only experienced tinkerers will be able to do this at home – everyone else will have to go to a bike shop. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The Best Value Tip goes to the Trek Slash 8. This may seem like a strange choice at first, but just like the Canyon, the bike, which is sold through a dealer network, won us over with its excellent handling and rear suspension. It’s a bit more playful and agile than some of our other test bikes because of its compact frame, but it can still handle rougher terrain. If you decide to go for the € 2,999 bike, we recommend upgrading the brakes and tires immediately. Some shops will be willing to swap components and only charge the difference if you do it before taking the bike home. Once you’ve done that, the bike delivers an excellent package at what is still a fair price, and you’ve got a local dealer to fall back on. The RADON SWOOP 9.0, the Propain Spindrift and the YT CAPRA are brilliant bikes for those who won’t accept any compromises in the spec. The RADON is an excellent climber, though some of the frame details could be improved. It also demands an active riding style, just like the YT. However, neither comes close to the Canyon in terms of rear suspension performance. The suspension on the Propain is fantastic, but the front and rear weight distribution is unbalanced due to the long chainstays and like the YT, it’s a very sluggish climber. We also recommend upgrading the tires on all three of these bikes. Though the geometry of Specialized Stumpjumper Evo is very radical, its suspension quickly reaches its limits in demanding terrain. It’s more of a Trail bike for steep terrain than a capable Enduro bike. Speaking of Trail bikes, the SCOTT Ransom also feels most at home on less demanding terrain despite its huge 170 mm travel. Its suspension is super plush, but unfortunately it doesn’t provide enough support. Due to the TwinLoc system, you also won’t find a compression adjuster on the fork. However, the Ransom is the most efficient bike in the test field and flies up the climbs. The FOCUS SAM 8.9 is very playful not only because of its small wheels but also because of its compact geometry. The rear suspension blows through its travel too quickly though (despite volume spacers) and on very rough trails, the bike lacks composure. If you like playing with the terrain, this is the bike for you. Best in test – Canyon Strive CF 5.0 Best value – Trek Slash 8 All the bikes in test: Canyon Strive CF 5.0 | FOCUS SAM 8.9 | Propain Spindrift Performance | RADON Swoop 9.0 | SCOTT Ransom 920 | Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Comp Alloy 29 | Trek Slash 8 | YT Capra 29 AL Comp This article is from ENDURO issue #039ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free!

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Enduro MTB - RSS
14 - 24/07/2019 08:34:30

How does the birth of a child impact the life of an elite EWS rider racing at the highest level? How do they find the balance between family life and training? And is it even possible for them to walk the fine line between risk and reward, knowing that they have a family to look after at home? We spoke to Joe Barnes to find out. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The workshop of the affectionately named “clubhouse”, actually just a big wooden barn, can best be described as an organised mess. Around me, shelves are piled high with trophies, spare tires and countless bottles of bike wash. The workbench is covered in a blanket of tools, and there is a 10-week-old baby asleep in a seat on the floor. Standing in the middle of this organised chaos is Joe Barnes, fitting a new rear derailleur to his bright yellow Orange Alpine 6. The birth of a child is life changing. Time off work, saving money and sleepless nights are just a handful of the challenges faced by parents. Now imagine this, as well as being a new dad, you are also a professional mountain bike racer, putting it all on the line competing on some of the hardest trails in the world. Could you handle the life of elite enduro racer and father Joe Barnes? Joe, Fiona and baby Bo are making it work. I caught up with them at their home in the Scottish Highlands, in order to gain an insight into the daily life of the dad who also races for and manages the Hazzard Racing team. Who is Joe Barnes? Joe, a.k.a “Top Chief”, is an elite enduro racer from Fort William, Scotland. Well known for his podium bagging race performances, Joe is arguably even more successful with his homemade video series documenting the adventures of the “Dudes of Hazzard”, which follows the crazy exploits of a small group of Scotland’s most creative and entertaining riders. Having finished installing the new rear mech, Joe walks over and gently picks up the sleeping baby. “This is Bo Barnes” he says, proudly introducing me to his son. We head up a set of creaky wooden stairs, the walls beside me lined with race plates, some still speckled with dried mud from the other side of the world. Through the door at the top of the stairs, we enter Joe’s office and gym. Next to a window looking out on the looming mountainsides are Joe’s desk and computer, where all the “Dudes of Hazzard” videos are brought to life. He shows me a few scenes from his latest “Hazzard Racing” creation, a typical Joe Barnes production with flat-out riding and a sprinkling of banter thrown in for good measure. It is here where we talk about Joe’s life, going all the way back to the very beginning… Joe started riding mountain bikes when his family moved to Fort William from the Lake District. He was only five years old at the time. Like most of us, Joe started riding because it was a fun and accessible pastime. “I think it was just a fun thing to do, having junk bikes and riding around the campsite where I grew up” he says, smiling, and hands me a photo of himself wheelieing an old bike through the campsite, with no helmet and seemingly not a care in the world. I think it was just a fun thing to do, having junk bikes and riding around the campsite where I grew up. However, the fun quickly turned to passion when Joe witnessed the Fort William round of the Downhill World Cup, held just a couple of miles down the road at Nevis Range. Living so close to one of the most iconic downhill tracks in the world, it seems that Joe was always destined to fall in love with the sport. It wasn’t long before he picked up his first downhill bike, an old Orange Patriot, and started racing at the age of fourteen. Joe competed as a Junior in the Scottish Downhill Association National series but soon set his sights on international racing. Having followed the world circuit around the globe with his dad, the biggest lesson he learned from his junior years is that racing isn’t always easy and that sometimes the races you look forward to most are the ones that end up disappointing you. “I always liked racing the Fort William World Cup, but I never did that well in it so it was always a bit of a love-hate relationship” Joe recalls. When the Enduro World Series came along, Joe knew this was an event that played to his strengths and was an opportunity not to be missed. Being a very technical rider, he preferred the long, steep and gnarly stages over the flat out tracks that were becoming all too common in the Downhill World Cup. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The new format of Enduro racing clearly suited him and Joe’s results were quickly noticed. He signed with Canyon Factory Racing Enduro for the 2013 season and for the next six years, he would fly the banner for the German direct-to-consumer brand while competing in the EWS. When talking about some of his personal highlights, there are numerous podiums, stage wins and outstanding results to choose from, but for Joe, the best feeling is simply when his riding just “clicks”. 2019 brought about some big changes for Joe. He announced that he would be leaving Canyon to set up his own program, called Hazzard Racing, with handpicked sponsors, a brand new bike and his own team setup. Shortly after the team change, an even more significant event took place – Bo Barnes was born in March 2019. It may seem like the switch to the new program and the birth of his first child were planned to coincide, but Joe tells me “It was actually just coincidental, the two things happening, but it has actually worked really well.” You gotta set an example for the little man, don’t you? You gotta be sending it. But how does the birth of a child affect the priorities of someone who’s only previous responsibilities were to go fast on a bike? As I watch Joe lovingly cradle Bo in his arms, he explains to me that the process of setting up his new team has actually impacted his training and racing schedule more than the family side of things. “I’ve definitely done less training this winter, but that’s more been down to setting the team up than family. I think I’m running on previous years’ training at the moment… But I still would have preferred to have done it this way” A topic that I often hear discussed by friends who have kids of their own is how the amount of risk they are prepared to take whilst riding has changed after having a child. For many, their risk perception has changed and they feel less comfortable pushing their limits on the bike. I mention this to Joe and am initially somewhat surprised by his response. “No, it hasn’t felt like it so far. It’s definitely not at the forefront of my mind when I’m doing something dodgy…” he laughs “You gotta set an example for the little man, don’t you? You gotta be sending it.” However, on reflection, it makes sense. A racer like Joe has spent their entire career walking the fine line between risk and reward, and they know their limits a lot better than the rest of us. “But I don’t feel like I’m too much of a risk taker. I’ve always ridden a bit conservatively which I think is a bit of a shame… But I’m one of the few people that have ridden all the EWS until the two I missed this year, that’s something like 49 races finished back to back, all healthy and consistent.” As we watch in silence, the baby begins to stir and wake. Will Bo Barnes follow in his father’s footsteps? Every parent who is passionate about something dreams that their child will be born with that same passion and Joe is no different. “I think I’d be lying if I didn’t say I was going to try and get him into it” he tells me. “Just get into football, it’s just as good as riding haha” he tells Bo sarcastically, then, to make sure the little boy knows he’s only joking he states “… it’s clearly not as good!” I say my goodbyes to Joe and Fiona, and offer my finger to shake hands with the little boy. Bo reaches out and holds on with a strong grip. He stares into my eyes and perhaps I am just imagining it, but in his eyes, I see the fiery determination of a future champion. We want to extend our thanks to Joe, Fiona and Bo for having us around and giving us an insight into their personal lives. Thank you and all the best! This article is from ENDURO issue #039ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free!

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8 - 11/07/2019 16:17:39

[Press Release] – The all-new SCOTT Gambler Tuned is the result of several years of R&D, working with some of the world’s best athletes both on and off the race track in order the one of the lightest, most adjustable downhill bikes on the World Cup Circuit. Progression adjust, wheel size adjust, and a frame weight of just 2650g including hardware combine to create a pure race machine. So, how did we get there? Considering the bike as a complete system we broke things down into four main factors: construction, adjustability, geometry and integration. COSTRUTION We wanted the bike to be light, stiff and strong. If you look at our racing pedigree across other disciplines, we aim to always give our athletes as many competitive advantages over other brands as possible. With the weight advantage, we’ve become experts over the years, and can finally apply this expertise to a downhill race rig. The Gambler Tuned’s carbon frame with hardware comes in at 2650g. However, carbon design and engineering go beyond just weight, as when we set a weight target, we set up a stiffness target as well. We worked closely with our athletes to determine a good blend of stiffness and flex, aiming to give them a tool that would be proficient on all world cup tracks and in all conditions. Working with various materials and layup techniques we were able to achieve a torsionally stiff frame for responsive behavior but with the right level of lateral flex to provide compliance and comfort on difficult sections of track. Even though we were able to get to our low weight target, we didn’t compromise on our strength target. This is a downhill bike after all, and it needs to be able to roll with the punches. We test all our bikes to our own very high standard, which sits well above industry norms, and with the Gambler we wanted to make sure that the bike could withstand the forces a professional athlete can exert during a world cup season. There is no point in making a lightweight, fast bike if it isn’t a strong bike. ADJUSTABILITY Our downhill bikes have always pushed the boundaries of adjustability. Both a rider and a bike need to be able to adapt to tracks, weather conditions and choice of shock (air or coil.) The new Gambler allows you to switch between wheelsizes without changing any other components on the bike. Chain stay length can also be adjusted, independent of wheelsize choice. Short with 29”, sure thing. Long with 27.5? Yep, that too. The Gambler also comes with spare angled headset cups, so that you can adjust head angle relative to wheelsize, fork choice etc. We also have a 4-way chip to allow not only bottom bracket height adjustment relative to wheelsize, but more importantly for geometry/kinematic tweaks depending on tracks, shocks or rider preference. We want the bike to be optimizable for each shock and rider given the track. GEOMETRY INTEGRATION Integration is becoming a more important topic at SCOTT as time goes by. We spent a lot of time here looking at previous concepts and asking ourselves if we really wanted to grandfather into the new bike performance compromises due to old standards – we didn’t. Enter our proprietary chain guide / bash guard solution. It seems like it shouldn’t make a huge difference on the bike, but it turns out it does. We even joke saying that it dictated the design of the entire bike. Why make this a proprietary piece? Chain devices are normally made to work with many different bikes and are therefore compromised. We only need to make it work for this one frame and a specific range of chainring sizes, so it can be easier to setup, better performing, lighter and allows us to gain some advantages on the frame construction, further reducing weight and increasing reliability/durability. SYNCROS HIXON iC DH Integration is nowhere stronger than in the cockpit. The new Hixon iC DH for Syncros builds on their recent developments with one-piece cockpits to build the lightest DH cockpit on the market. Why build a one piece? A traditional bar and stem must be reinforced at the clamping point, particularly when using carbon. By molding the two of these together we no longer need to reinforce this point and can concentrate on finding the perfect stiffness values for the bar. Furthermore, we can build a super strong layup which can withstand 260kg on each side in a downward force (over half a ton in total) and return to its original shape without any deformation- well above our own rigorous in-house standards for a DH bar. More questions about the bike? Listen to Tim Stevens, the lead engineer behind the Gambler, tell you everything you might ever want to know with regards to the technological features and concepts behind the all-new SCOTT Gambler. This educational video comes with subtitles in various languages. The new SCOTT Gambler 900 Tuned will be available in stores by December of 2019 at a provisional price point of 7999€. Stay “tuned” for further information. Scott

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4 - 11/07/2019 12:17:29

We’ve seen the Scott Factory team testing the new Gambler for some time now and Scott is ready to debut it for the public. It can run 27.5 or 29″ wheels and has many adjustments available to alter the geometry and progressiveness of the shock. Details inside from Scott. Product Photography: Keno Derleyn Introducing the All New SCOTT Gambler The all NEW Gambler Tuned was designed for one thing only, pure, unadulterated speed. Taking years of racing development and mixing it with our carbon expertise, this bike is our answer to the needs of white-knuckle downhill racing. Givisiez, Switzerland – The all-new SCOTT Gambler Tuned is the result of several years of R&D, working with some of the world’s best athletes both on and off the race track in order the one of the lightest, most adjustable downhill bikes on the World Cup Circuit. Progression adjust, wheel size adjust, and a frame weight of just 2650g including hardware combine to create a pure race machine. So, how did we get there? Considering the bike as a complete system we broke things down into four main factors: construction, adjustability, geometry and integration. CONSTRUCTION We wanted the bike to be light, stiff and strong. If you look at our racing pedigree across other disciplines, we aim to always give our athletes as many competitive advantages over other brands as possible. With the weight advantage, we’ve become experts over the years, and can finally apply this expertise to a downhill race rig. The Gambler Tuned’s carbon frame with hardware comes in at 2650g. However, carbon design and engineering go beyond just weight, as when we set a weight target, we set up a stiffness target as well. We worked closely with our athletes to determine a good blend of stiffness and flex, aiming to give them a tool that would be proficient on all world cup tracks and in all conditions. Working with various materials and layup techniques we were able to achieve a torsionally stiff frame for responsive behavior but with the right level of lateral flex to provide compliance and comfort on difficult sections of track. Even though we were able to get to our low weight target, we didn’t compromise on our strength target. This is a downhill bike after all, and it needs to be able to roll with the punches. We test all our bikes to our own very high standard, which sits well above industry norms, and with the Gambler we wanted to make sure that the bike could withstand the forces a professional athlete can exert during a world cup season. There is no point in making a lightweight, fast bike if it isn’t a strong bike. ADJUSTABILITY Our downhill bikes have always pushed the boundaries of adjustability. Both a rider and a bike need to be able to adapt to tracks, weather conditions and choice of shock (air or coil.) The new Gambler allows you to switch between wheelsizes without changing any other components on the bike. Chain stay length can also be adjusted, independent of wheelsize choice. Short with 29”, sure thing. Long with 27.5? Yep, that too. The Gambler also comes with spare angled headset cups, so that you can adjust head angle relative to wheelsize, fork choice etc. We also have a 4-way chip to allow not only bottom bracket height adjustment relative to wheelsize, but more importantly for geometry/kinematic tweaks depending on tracks, shocks or rider preference. We want the bike to be optimizable for each shock and rider given the track. Choose between two chainstay lengths, and 4 different BB positions to always have the perfect setup for each rider, each track, each type of shock etc. Race Ready – Dean Lucas testing the new SCOTT Gambler Tuned to its core. Dean Lucas Action Photos: Sven Martin “From the moment i first got on the new SCOTT Gambler, I felt comfortable and it took very little setup to make me feel right at home. I think my favorite thing about it is how light it is and its ability to carry speed on even the flattest tracks. And damn, it looks sexy!” – Dean Lucas SCOTT DH FACTORY INTEGRATION Integration is becoming a more important topic at SCOTT as time goes by. We spent a lot of time here looking at previous concepts and asking ourselves if we really wanted to grandfather into the new bike performance compromises due to old standards – we didn’t. Enter our proprietary chain guide / bash guard solution. It seems like it shouldn’t make a huge difference on the bike, but it turns out it does. We even joke saying that it dictated the design of the entire bike. Why make this a proprietary piece? Chain devices are normally made to work with many different bikes and are therefore compromised. We only need to make it work for this one frame and a specific range of chainring sizes, so it can be easier to setup, better performing, lighter and allows us to gain some advantages on the frame construction, further reducing weight and increasing reliability/durability. By ditching the traditional ISCG Chainguide/bashguard standard, we were able to design specifically around our frame, opening up many options for clever solutions that otherwise wouldn’t have been available. SYNCROS HIXON iC DH Integration is nowhere stronger than in the cockpit. The new Hixon iC DH for Syncros builds on their recent developments with one-piece cockpits to build the lightest DH cockpit on the market. Why build a one piece? A traditional bar and stem must be reinforced at the clamping point, particularly when using carbon. By molding the two of these together we no longer need to reinforce this point and can concentrate on finding the perfect stiffness values for the bar. Furthermore, we can build a super strong layup which can withstand 260kg on each side in a downward force (over half a ton in total) and return to its original shape without any deformation- well above our own rigorous in-house standards for a DH bar. Read more at https://www.scott-sports.com/global/en/gambler-tuned

Posted by
Sickline
2 - 09/07/2019 13:34:29

There is no one single kit that'll equip a home or pro shop with absolutely everything needed to install and remove every bottom bracket out there, but the Wheels Manufacturing Professional Bottom Bracket Tool Kit will give you a great start to bottom bracket installation and maintenance. The post Review: Wheels Manufacturing Professional Bottom Bracket Tool Kit | $250 appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
4 - 28/06/2019 12:51:32

View this post on Instagram Taking a simple children’s arts and crafts concept and attempting to make it as professional as possible. @im_tom_cruise threw his tarmac at me and said “do something you’ve been scared to do, I don’t care if you fuck up.” Here is the result. The biggest risks reap the biggest rewards. Huge shoutout to @collinchappelle for always making my work look even better on 📸 . . . #tarmac #specializedtarmac #sworkstarmac #tarmacsl6 #savetherimbrake #zippspeedweaponry #srametap #iamspecialized A post shared by Tyler Angelo Marchesano (@tunedbytyler) on Jun 27, 2019 at 8:19am PDT This amazing custom marble-finish S-Works Tarmac SL6 has blown the collective minds of BikeRadar HQ. The incredible custom finish was created by Tyler Marchesano — the wonder-mechanic behind the Di2shifter/PlayStation button mashup that we wrote about last year — who has recently branched out into paintwork. This custom collab Specialized Allez Sprint could be yours Is this PlayStation, SRAM and Di2 mashup the ultimate mechanics hack? The bike has been built for Chris Chou — a colleague of Marchesano’s who has no shortage of beautiful bikes — who asked Marchesano to undertake “something you’ve been scared to do” with the paintjob. The risk has clearly paid off. The rich grey-ish-pink-ish marble finish is stunning and we’ve enjoyed ogling at this and Marchesano’s other work all day. Exactly how he has pulled off the paintwork isn’t clear, but to our minds, the mystery only makes it all the more alluring. Be sure to scroll through the whole Instagram gallery up top to see every detail and, if you don’t already, be sure to give Tyler Marchesano’s account a follow. You won’t be disappointed!

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 27/06/2019 10:51:32

Computer navigation is great, but a paper map gives you your bearings like nothing else Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Canal towpaths are one of the tamer strands to gravel riding in the UK Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Farm tracks are a feature of the British countryside which open up to you on gravel bikes Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Roadie Mark Bailey explores narrow towpaths, bumpy bridleways, muddy climbs and stony descents Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Shifting weight is key to manoeuvring your bike over uneven, rocky ground Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Gravel bikes allow you to explore more than roads Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Keep an eye on your map’s contours, otherwise this might happen Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Gravel riding will test your limits Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media In the second instalment of our Adventure Addicts series in association with Scott Sports, roadie Mark Bailey joins former British CX champion Nick Craig in his Peak District playground to learn the way of the gravel. Adventure Addicts part 1: Introduction to gravel riding Why road cyclists should try gravel riding Humans are creatures of habit, but can also thrive on change. With that in mind, I’m in the Peak District for an introduction into gravel riding, a trip designed to help me escape my usual road-riding routine and explore narrow towpaths, bumpy bridleways, muddy climbs and stony descents in pursuit of a wilder off-road experience. But, like all the best bike journeys, this one begins in a cosy kitchen, with an Ordnance Survey map spread across the table, a military-style debate over kit and the buzz of a new adventure. Roadie Mark Bailey explores narrow towpaths, bumpy bridleways, muddy climbs and stony descents Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media The kitchen belongs to Nick Craig, a former professional cyclist who lives in the old mill town of Hayfield, which sits just beneath the iconic gritstone cliffs of Kinder Scout. Having won three national cyclocross titles and four national mountain bike titles, he is the perfect guide to gravel riding. “Road cyclists will find gravel riding a lot of fun because gravel bikes open up a whole new world of interesting places to ride,” he insists. When I first read about gravel bikes – which combine race-ready road frames with thick tyres and disc brakes, liberating you to tackle tarmac and trails on the same bike – I was intrigued. As a road cyclist I love epic 100km rides and the thrill of speed, but I instinctively seek out scenic spots and quieter backroads. To fuse adrenaline with adventure – blasting along a road at 40km/h then darting off-road to explore some trails – sounds like something that I could quickly embrace. Canal towpaths are one of the tamer strands to gravel riding in the UK Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Scott Addict Gravel 30 I’m riding a Scott Addict Gravel 30. Its 35mm Schwalbe G-One Allround knobblies are a whole 12mm wider than my road tyres, and its confidence-boosting Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, should give me all the stopping power I’ll need. What’s more it has an adventure-ready 11-34 rear cassette, which, since the biggest sprocket on my road bike is a 28, feels huge in comparison. Scott Addict Gravel 10 review How to plan a gravel ride The bike may be ready, but I have no idea how to plan a gravel adventure, which is why Nick and his OS map are here to help. “As well as normal roads, you can ride on gravel trails, bridleways, mountain bike trails, disused railway lines and towpaths,” explains Nick, tracing our planned route with his finger. “You just connect them up to make your own route.” Whereas road cyclists are limited to riding the pink and orange road lines on an OS map, gravel bikes enable you to explore the dotted green and orange bridleways, footpaths and byways, as well as any trails running through the green and brown smudges of moorland, forests and mountains. You can also explore unsurfaced roads, Forestry Commission tracks and easier mountain bike trails, which are graded green or blue. New gravel riders can use route-planning tech such as Strava and Garmin Connect, which list many off-road trails, as well as the OS Maps app which includes aerial 3D imagery. The Komoot app harnesses the input of local riders to provide a detailed analysis of routes, elevations and profiles. “Komoot is great for off-road routes because it shows all the local trails which make gravel riding so much fun,” says Nick. “But I find it best to combine maps and websites to work out the best routes.” Computer navigation is great, but a paper map gives you your bearings like nothing else Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media What to take on your first gravel ride Before we head out, Nick talks me through the kit required for gravel riding. Road cyclists can wear all their usual clobber: with the thicker tyres, you don’t need extra padding in your bib-shorts, and you won’t ride anywhere which requires knee pads or a full-face helmet. You have to carry the usual back-up kit of tyre levers, inner tubes, tyre plugs, a multi-tool and some food and drink. In more remote terrain it’s best to also pack a compact chain tool, spare link (Shimano Speed Quick Link and SRAM Power Link both offer tool-free assembly) and repair patches. Mountain bike shoes and pedals, and a tubeless tyre setup, are the two major kit upgrades you can make and there’ll be more about this in next month’s instalment. Keep an eye on your map’s contours, otherwise this might happen Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Gravel riding in the Peak District When we start riding through the sun-drenched lanes of Hayfield, I immediately forget I’m riding a gravel bike. The geometry is almost identical to my road bike and the 35mm tyres, which feature tiny dimples, purr smoothly on the road. The bike feels racy and agile, just like a road bike. “I ride the same setup on the road and on trails,” says Nick. “But a newcomer might want to drop the saddle 5mm to feel more comfortable on the terrain.” Of course, you can always install a new-fangled electronic dropper seatpost so you can change your position while you ride. Without much warning, we suddenly veer off the road and onto the Sett Valley Trail. The scenic track follows a disused railway line and forms part of the Pennine Bridleway National Trail. The road cycling devil on my shoulder starts worrying about falls and punctures, while the gravel cycling angel on my other shoulder reminds me that my bike’s chunky tyres can handle it. “It can take a while for road cyclists to adapt their mindset,” says Nick. To prove the point, he darts off the track. Just when I think he’s about to plough into a tree trunk, he disappears onto a hidden trail and emerges back onto the main path a few seconds later. “When you get used to them, gravel bikes change your whole perspective,” he says. On a normal road ride, I stay alert for potholes and wet leaves but on a gravel bike I’m soon ploughing through puddles and bumping over stones. After a short time we reach the old cotton-spinning town of New Mills. Shifting weight is key to manoeuvring your bike over uneven, rocky ground Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Gravel riding tips 1. Don’t venture too far I’d assumed we’d be out in the hills all day but Nick says for the best gravel experience it’s better to aim for variety. “It’s usually good to find places on the edges of towns and cities because that’s where you get all the interesting canal paths, bridleways and old railways, as well as the typical trails mountain bikers would follow. That’s when you’ll get the most out of a gravel bike and really see what it can do.” 2. Stay seated on steep climbs We take a sharp turn and emerge on a muddy uphill trail. I’m in too big a gear, which leaves my back wheel slipping. “Reading the route up ahead is important so you can prepare for what’s next,” advises Nick, who reminds me to stay seated on steep climbs to weigh down the back wheel. I try it and successfully wriggle up the slippery track. 3. Use your weight to stay in control The first major obstacle of the day looms into view: a steep-sided canal bridge. The thought of bombing down the other side, however, leaves me terrified. “Standing up over the saddle will allow you to use your body to counter the terrain,” advises Nick. It’s against all my road-cycling instincts to stand up on a descent, but those chunkier tyres make it possible. I keep my weight towards the back of the bike and feel much more agile and in control. “Think about how a cat walks gently on a roof, carefully adjusting its weight and balance,” says Nick. “Those subtle shifts are what you are aiming for.” 4. Keep a high cadence Having survived the steep ramp, I’m annoyed when a few moments later I tumble sideways on an innocuous muddy slope in a park. “A smooth and steady cadence is always best on unstable terrain so you don’t create excessive torque and cause wheel spin,” says Nick. 5. Use the momentum A key lesson I’ve learned from watching Nick all day is the importance of momentum. As a road cyclist, I instinctively get nervous at the sight of any hazard up ahead and I’m quick to brake or swerve. “On gravel, speed is usually your friend,” says Nick. “When your wheels are rolling you have better traction and grip.” When we encounter our first gravel section, I toy with different speeds: as soon as I slow down I start sinking into the stones, whereas at speed the bike dances over the gravel. 6. Work on your core We swing onto a stony path to climb the ominously-named Mount Famine. I watch, fascinated, as Nick makes countless micro-adjustments as he rides up the trail, picking his way around boulders to find the smoothest path. The wider handlebars of a gravel bike make this much easier, but a few planks and sit-ups at home would really help because your core muscles get taxed much more out on the trails than on the road. 7. Choose your kit well As my saddle bag bounces around chaotically, Nick points out some of his own Syncros gadgets: a bottle cage with an integrated multitool slot and a saddle bag which screws directly into the saddle, which both serve to keep you light and well balanced on the trails. From the top of Mount Famine we enjoy sweeping views of the moorland terrain, which is neatly carved up by stone walls into a vast patchwork quilt of browns and greens. I realise once again how thick the silence is up here, far removed from the traffic down below. 8. Know your limits A few mountain bikers pass by and say there are some crazy descents we could try nearby. But it’s important to know your limits. Unlike them, I’m not on a chunky downhill bike with full suspension. “When you are planning your route, keep an eye on the contour lines to make sure it’s not too steep,” advises Nick. “There are usually different ways to get down a mountain. But you can always get off and walk for a section if you need to.” 9. Descend with confidence I knew the long and bumpy descent into Hayfield would be the hardest part of the day and it doesn’t disappoint. As a road cyclist, the sight of small rocks and loose stones has all my synapses blinking on red alert. Nick gives me a few pointers: keep your head up to help identify the smoothest route down, and try not to go so slow that you lose your balance – easily done if you are feeling nervous. I successfully trundle down the stony path but when I reach a section of thick mud I unclip and walk. 10. Enjoy the versatility We emerge onto a main road and I realise how peaceful our ride has been so far. After the tranquillity of the trails and canal paths, riding next to cars feels strange, although it’s nice to see how easily these versatile bikes switch from grinding over gravel to slicing along tarmac again. Gravel riding will test your limits Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media What you’ll learn from gravel riding Gravel biking is about testing – but also recognising – your limits. And being able to connect different trails by walking a few segments is what liberates you to reach places you wouldn’t otherwise visit. When we arrive back in Hayfield for some toasted teacakes at Millie’s Tea Rooms, I am amazed to hear that we have only cycled around 25km, despite being out on the trails for hours. But in that short loop we’ve enjoyed a kaleidoscope of rugged peaks, dazzling green valleys, peaceful canal paths, adrenaline soaked gravel dashes, muddy falls, and lots of spontaneous debates over which path to take next. Planning your route is crucial, but making impromptu decisions along the way is all part of the fun. Gravel cycling is one activity where to say “get lost” is an invitation, not an insult. This article was produced in association with Scott Sports. Navigation and mapping assistance courtesy of Komoot.

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 25/06/2019 01:34:31

Zero Motorcycles, the brand that defined the category of electric motorcycles, introduced their most innovative and powerful motorcycle yet with the launch of SR/F earlier this year. Now, Zero’s internal engineering team, in collaboration with multiple partners, has transformed its new streetfighter into a full-blown racer, which AMA-professional racer Cory West will put to the test at the 2019 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb on June 30. “The racing effort for Pikes Pike at Zero is entirely run with internal engineering staff, who mostly commit their lunches, nights, and weekends to the cause,” said Brian Wismann, VP of Product Development at Zero Motorcycles. “No dedicated team members or factory-level budgets here. The bike was built with the support of key suppliers to the Zero production line, plus some clever designs from an engineering team let loose to experiment.” With 110 horsepower and 140 lb-ft of torque, Zero’s production SR/F already boasts impressive performance stats that challenge competitors representing the biggest names in the industry. Through the company’s “Blue Sky” program, which encourages Zero engineers to explore their creativity and reach for new heights, the SR/F has become an even more formidable contender, thanks in large part to the help of existing brand partners including Gates Carbon Drive, Showa, Pirelli Tires, SME Group, Dymag and Hotbodies Racing. In lieu of the chain kit typically used for race bikes, Zero engineers opted to stick with the same Gates Carbon Drive belt found on the production model. Their hope is that the smooth delivery of torque from the concentric pivot and constant tension belt will give the SR/F an advantage when pitted against gas bikes, which need to shift and respond to power pulses and surges from internal combustion engines. In order to upgrade the suspension on the SR/F, Zero tapped Showa for their rare Balance Free Front Fork (BFF) and Balance Free Rear Cushion lite (BFRC-lite) rear shock. The Showa components also serve the dual purpose of adding a contrasting visual accent against the matte black of the bike. Adding utlity and further visual character to the racer, Dymag forged aluminum wheels provide crucial weight savings, plus aesthetic appeal befitting the Pirelli Superbike Slicks fitted to them. Additional adaptations to the SR/F from Zero’s engineering team include two handlebar-mounted brake levers, which allow for better rear brake modulation while banking deeply into right hand turns – only possible through the clutch-less design of Zero’s direct drive electric motor. Custom rearsets were also designed to accommodate the bike’s unique swingarm pivot, which is concentric with the motor output shaft. Bringing together the overall concept is designer Tom Zipprian’s custom bodywork, which was 3D printed in-house specifically for Pikes Peak and reinforced with carbon fiber. Large number plates are required per race regulations, and this serves to stylishly accommodate those as well as provide useful data on testing the potential aerodynamic benefits of similar elements that generate downforce. The post Zero Motorcycles SR/F Set To Tackle Pike’s Peak appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
4pts
24/06/2019
4 - 11/06/2019 12:34:20

Can eMTBing with the whole family ever end well? Whining children, varying fitness and skill levels and completely different interests – oh, the joy of family holidays. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); For many riders, the weekends are a dilemma. You’ve got the temptation of bike adventures on the one hand, and family responsibilities on the other. Your partner wants attention, the kids want to have fun, and the new wardrobe from Ikea isn’t going to build itself. Not to mention grandma’s inevitable invitation to Sunday roast. Of course, in the long run, you won’t be able to resist following the call of the trails of famous weekend destinations in the Alps or even Finale Ligure. But does it have to be that way? After all, happiness is always within reach. A short trip usually fulfils the doctor’s recommended daily dose of e-bike fun! A short trip usually fulfils the doctor’s recommended daily dose of e-bike fun!! That’s exactly what we did on our trip to the Mobility Centre in Münsingen in the Swabian Jura with our trusted friend and dentist Kilian Klügel, his wife Julia and their children (Nelson 5 years, Ruben 9 months). The centre promises “a new form of mobility, a new form of tourism” and we were curious to find out what that meant. Above all, we wanted to reduce the risk of the trip coming to grinding halt after the first few meters with protesting kids or ending in organisational chaos. As is often the case on family holidays, the tots were much better equipped than their parents. Son Nelson brought his ebike, and the 9-month old Ruben had his trailer. Try as we might, and despite the Klügels T5 Multivan, there was no room left for the adults’ bikes. No problem – the mobility centre in Münsingen led by Jürgen Schwald has everything you need. That includes 25 rental bikes from Bergamont and CONWAY equipped with Bosch Nyon onboard computers and preinstalled routes, as well as professional advice and assistance. You don’t have to waste any time planning routes! The Mobility Center was founded 2016, providing a comprehensive concept for GPS guided e-bike tours that open up a 700 km network of routes in the Swabian Jura nature reserve and beyond. If you want to bring your own eMTB, you can easily load and ride routes with Komoot, and they’re all clearly marked whilst out riding too. If you want to rent an e-bike, we recommend booking in advance as demand is high! The 12 routes currently available are aimed at families, leisure riders and beginners, leading you through the picturesque UNESCO nature reserve and past the region’s most beautiful attractions. Those on the hunt for singletrack adrenaline will have to be patient for the moment, though more demanding options are in the pipeline. There’s also talk of an uphill flow-trail to be constructed in cooperation with Bosch. Being a family outing, extreme riding wasn’t That’s not what we were after this weekend. After a quick briefing by Jürgen, setting up the bikes and assembling the child trailer, we were off. If you want to, you can explore the local cuisine along the way at discounted rates with the “Genuss-Tour” (Pleasure-Ride) voucher booklet. Since we were travelling with small kids, we didn’t bother with a schedule – after all, you never know if and when the mood might take a turn for the worse. Let’s just see how long the kids have fun! Not only for Superman: Nelson’s stylish and super-light Ben-E-Bike TWENTY E-POWER We set off at a relaxed pace, across meadows and valleys, flying up the climbs without breaking a sweat. The mood was great with time to stop and enjoy the little things along the way. Picking plums, smelling the flowers, playing at the well, riding wooden goats on a farm. And thank goodness, the kids were clearly having the time of their lives! We passed the former military training area, which today makes up part of the Swabian Jura nature reserve, and we were stoked with the progress we were making. That’s until Nelson flew like Superman – although unfortunately, off his bike. A short break and a hug from Mum later, he managed to wipe away the frown and carry on. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Once we got back to Münsingen via the beautiful Trailfinger Gorge, we played the surefire ice-cream card, although we didn’t actually need to with broad smiles already all around! As the well-deserved ice-cream cooled our tongues and made the kids’ hands all sticky, we contemplated: the worries we have as parents are usually unfounded! Days like these prove time and again the magic a short holiday can work, especially if you don’t have to worry about the equipment and planning. A carefree outing, as it used to be when your own parents organised everything! We managed to pull off an eventful, but relaxed 12-hour holiday with the whole family. Who said the weekends are too short and riders are always faced with a dilemma between family and riding? One thing was certain: we would be back! But first, we had to race home in time for grandma’s Sunday roast. For more info head to: muensingen.com This article is from E-MOUNTAINBIKE issue #017E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free! Der Beitrag Mobility Centre Münsingen – A 12-hour holiday with the whole family erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine