6 - 25/11/2019 15:17:15

Mondraker have just announced an all-new lineup of Crafty Carbon eMTBs featuring 160/150 mm travel, 29” wheels, Bosch Performance CX motors and 625 Wh integrated batteries as well as impressively low weight and much more! Read all the most important information right here! Mondraker Crafty RR SL | 160/150 mm travel (f/r) | 29” Wheels | Bosch Performance CX 625 Wh | 11,999 € | 19.9 kg with 625 Wh battery (size Medium) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The Crafty Carbon is Mondraker’s top of the line enduro all-rounder. All models share the same 160/150 mm suspension travel, roll on 29” wheels and are powered by the Bosch Performance CX Gen 4 motor and an integrated, non-removable 625 Wh battery. The Crafty RR SL will also be available with the smaller 500 Wh battery, for those who care more about riding performance than extended range. Features of the new Mondraker Crafty Carbon The new Crafty Carbon lineup has a host of new features, starting with the new carbon frame. All the new carbon frames are constructed from Mondraker’s premium Stealth Air Carbon, which the brand claim has allowed them to achieve the lightest possible weight without compromising on reliability whilst still reaching optimum stiffness in all areas of the frame. Mondraker have succeeded in reaching a very low frame weight, with the Crafty Carbon RR SL weighing in at just 19.3kg in size Medium with a 500 Wh Powertube battery. Mondraker have used their premium Stealth Air Carbon Technology for all Crafty Carbon frames For 2020, Mondraker have also optimised their Zero Suspension System (a virtual pivot with two moving links) for eMTB use. Refinements are claimed to include less chain growth and less brake-jack, as well as increased initial suppleness and end-stroke progression. All Crafty Carbon models come specced with FOX DPS metric sized and Trunnion mounted shocks that have been specifically tuned for the new Zero E-Bike Optimised system. Mondraker’s Zero Suspension System has been optimised for their 2020 range of eMTBs The three Crafty Carbon models are specced with the popular Bosch Performance CX Gen 4 motor (Click here to see how the new Bosch eMTB motor compares against the competition). The 625 Wh Powertube powering it is sleekly integrated, however, it is not removable meaning you will have to bring your Crafty Carbon inside and attach the charger directly to the bike when charging the battery. It also means that you cannot ride with a spare battery to further extend the Crafty’s range. As mentioned, the flagship Crafty Carbon RR SL is also available with an integrated and non-removable 500 Wh Powertube, for those chasing the lowest weight possible. Mondraker have engineered a cooling airflow system into the frame, which should help to dissipate heat and keep the Bosch system performing at its best. The air enters through the cooling grills at the headtube and travels down past the battery, and is then expelled through an opening at the opposite end of the battery. We can’t comment on the cooling system’s effectiveness just yet, however, the intake ports look to be visibly smaller than those found on the Merida eONE-SIXTY. This air intake is said to help keep the Bosch system cool during heavy use All three Crafty Carbon models feature the popular Bosch Performance CX motor… … and Kiox display, as well as an integrated, non-removable Powertube battery Crafty Carbon R and RR models also benefit from Mondraker’s Hidden Housing Guide technology for their gear cable, rear brake hose and internal dropper cables. The Crafty Carbon RR SL comes specced with SRAM’s wireless AXS dropper and shifting, therefore only the rear brake cable is routed through the frame. All models come as standard with an Acros Internal Cable Routing headset which should keep the cockpit neat and tidy. The Hidden Housing Guide and Acros Internal Cable Routing headset should keep everything tidy up front Finishing touches include the use of Enduro MAX bearings in the suspension links, an integrated dropout speed sensor and an oversized 1.5” headtube and steerer. The new chainstay and motor covers have also been designed to finish the Crafty Carbon frame with style. Geometry of the Mondraker Crafty Carbon The Crafty Carbon gets treated to Mondraker’s Forward Geometry concept, which has also been slightly refined for their 2020 bikes. Mondraker are eager to stress that they believe they have found the sweet spot for eMTB geometry, however, we will have to test the Crafty Carbon before we can confirm or deny these claims. The Crafty Carbon’s head angle sits at a relatively slack 65.5°, paired with the 160 mm travel FOX 36 with a 44 mm offset. The seat tube angle comes in at 76°, and the chainstays are 455 mm long on all models. Size S M L XL Seat tube 380 mm 420 mm 450 mm 480 mm Top tube 605 mm 625 mm 650 mm 670 mm Head tube 110 mm 110 mm 130 mm 130 mm Head angle 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° Seat angle 76° 76° 76° 76° Chainstay 455 mm 455 mm 455 mm 455 mm BB Height 350 mm 350 mm 350 mm 350 mm Wheelbase 1225 mm 1245 mm 1270 mm 1290 mm Reach 450 mm 470 mm 490 mm 510 mm Stack 622 mm 622 mm 640 mm 640 mm The Mondraker Crafty Carbon lineup The all-new Mondraker Crafty Carbon lineup consists of three models: the flagship Crafty Carbon RR SL (11.999 €), the Crafty Carbon RR (8.999 €) and the Crafty Carbon R (7.499 €). The Crafty Carbon RR SL and RR models will be available to purchase from the beginning of December 2019, and the Crafty R will hit the market in March 2020. Mondraker Crafty Carbon RR SL Mondraker Crafty RR SL | 160/150 mm travel (f/r) | 29” Wheels | Bosch Performance CX 625 Wh | 11,999 € | 19.9 kg with 625 Wh battery (size Medium) The Crafty Carbon RR SL is the flagship model in Mondraker’s new eMTB lineup. Its spec is than drool-worthy, however, at the not so modest price of 11,999 €, we would expect nothing less. Highlights include its FOX Factory suspension, wireless SRAM Eagle XO1 AXS drivetrain and RockShox Reverb AXS dropper and Shimano XTR 4-piston brakes with 203 mm rotors front and rear. The Crafty Carbon RR SL rolls on DT Swiss HXC1200 Carbon wheels fitted with MAXXIS Rekon 29×2.6” tires in their EXO+ casing. Fork FOX 36 Factory Fit4 160 mm Rear shock FOX DPS Factory 150 mm Brakes Shimano XTR M9120 4-piston 203 mm rotor (f/r) Drivetrain SRAM Eagle XO1 AXS Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth AXS Stem Onoff Krypton FG 30 mm Bars Onoff Krypton Carbon 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss HXC1200 Carbon Spline 29 Tires Maxxis Rekon 29×2.6″ 3C MAXX TERRA, EXO+ Protection Weight 19.9 kg with 625 Wh Powertube / 19.3 kg with 500 Wh Powertube (Size Medium) Price 11,999 € Mondraker Crafty Carbon RR Mondraker Crafty RR | 160/150 mm travel (f/r) | 29” Wheels | Bosch Performance CX 625 Wh | 8,999 € | 21.3 kg with 625 Wh battery (size Medium) The Crafty Carbon RR shares the same FOX Factory suspension as it’s flagship stablemate, however, it comes equipped with a full Shimano XT 12-speed groupset including Shimano’s XT M8120 4-piston stoppers and 203 mm rotors front and back. DT Swiss HX1501 wheels and MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHRII 29×2.6” tires finish off the solid build. Fork FOX 36 Factory Fit4 160 mm Rear shock FOX DPS Factory 150 mm Brakes Shimano XT M8120 4-piston 203 mm rotor (f/r) Drivetrain Shimano XT M8100 12-speed Seatpost Onoff Pija Dropper Stem Onoff Krypton FG 30 mm Bars Onoff Krypton Carbon 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss HX1501 Spline One 29 Tires Maxxis Minion DHF/DHRII 29×2.6″ 3C MAXX TERRA, EXO+ Protection Weight 21.3 kg with 625 Wh Powertube (Size Medium) Price 8,999 € googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Mondraker Crafty Carbon R Mondraker Crafty R | 160/150 mm travel (f/r) | 29” Wheels | Bosch Performance CX 625 Wh | 7,499 € | 21.8 kg with 625 Wh battery (size Medium) The “entry-level” build in the Crafty Carbon lineup is kitted out with workhorse componentry and comes in at 7,499 €. FOX takes care of the suspension with a budget-conscious spec. The FOX 36 Performance takes care of things up front, and a FOX DPS Performance shock controls the rear-wheel travel. SRAM provide their GX/NX Eagle drivetrain and G2 RSC brakes, paired with 200 mm rotors at both ends. Fork FOX 36 Performance FIT GRIP 160 mm Rear shock FOX DPS Performance 150 mm Brakes SRAM G2 RSC 200 mm rotor (f/r) Drivetrain SRAM GX/NX Eagle Seatpost Onoff Pija Dropper Stem Onoff Krypton FG 30 mm Bars Onoff Krypton 1.0 780 mm Wheels DT Swiss H1900 Spline 29 Tires Maxxis Minion DHF/DHRII 29×2.6″ 3C MAXX TERRA, EXO+ Protection Weight 21.8 kg with 625 Wh Powertube (Size Medium) Price 7,499 € Our first thought about the new Mondraker Crafty Carbon The new Mondraker Crafty Carbon looks to be an exciting development in the Spanish brand’s eMTB lineup. The low weight looks promising but it has to be considered that the battery is not removable, meaning you can’t switch it during the ride and have to have a charging setup with space for the whole bike. Also, you will have to change the tires to unleash the bike’s full potential which will increase the overall weight. However, we are still looking forward to bringing you a full review soon, and finding out if its low weight, refined suspension and updated geometry let the Crafty Carbon fulfill Mondraker’s bold performance claims. Never heard of Mondraker? Then don’t miss our review on the Mondraker Level RR to find out how Mondraker bikes fit in the eMTB market. For more information head to mondraker.com Der Beitrag Mondraker release all-new sub-20 kg Crafty Carbon RR SL eMTB for 2020 erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
2 - 25/11/2019 14:01:01

Mondraker presents their new electric mountain bike Crafty Carbon models, breaking the rules with its flagship model RR SL by being the first e-MTB with 29″ and 150mm of travel under 20kg. Main Features Frame: Stealth Air Carbon Wheels: 29″ Suspension: Zero Travel front/rear: 160mm/150mm Hub spacing front/rear: Boost 110×15mm/148×12mm Drivetrain: 1×12 Motor: Bosch Performance Line CX 4 Battery: Bosch Powertube 625Wh (Crafty RR SL also available with 500Wh battery) Weight: 19,3kg (Crafty RR SL + 500Wh battery); 19,8kg (Crafty RR SL + 625Wh battery); 21,3kg (Crafty RR); 21,8kg (Crafty R) Sizes: S, M, L, XL Prices: 7.499€ (Crafty R); 8.999€ (Crafty RR); 12.000€ (Crafty RR SL) Geometry For all Crafty Carbon models, Mondraker has refined and optimized its Forward Geometry. The sum of a 76° seat tube angle, 455mm short chainstays, long reach, and a 65.5° head tube angle combined with short 44mm fork offsets and 30mm stems pretend to offer overall better control and handling, stability, and confidence on every terrain, whether you are riding uphill or downhill. Detalles Mondraker has anticipated the future and the new trends that are to come, where weight and performance will play a very important role in some models of electric mountain bikes from different manufacturers. That is why, to lighten the weight of all Crafty Carbon frames, and thus also achieve a finer and nicer tube at the same time, Mondraker had to make the decision to depend on the battery extraction system, a feature that many will think is not right. While it is true that it is a risky decision, we must take into account that it is a pure performance electric mountain bike, and its purpose is not to be used to make long routes where you need to change the battery halfway. Crafty Carbon frames use Stealth Air technology, a manufacturing process that starts from the best selection of high modulus carbon fibers and the elaboration of a thorough and complex laminate. They feature a new cooling system that helps dissipate the heat generated by the battery, allowing the air to enter through integrated gills near the steering pipe, flow through the inside of the bottom pipe, and go outside through an outlet which is located above the lower part of the same tube. Bosch’s new fourth-generation Performance Line CX motor is now more compact, powerful and quiet, and although I like its improvements and operation, I can’t say the same about the display and the remote control, which I would like them to be more compact and ergonomic, like those of Shimano. The Bosch motor speed sensor is located inside the left rear dropout of the frame and the magnet is integrated into the brake rotor itself. Another very interesting new feature that we can find in the Crafty Carbon models is the Acros ICR (Integrated Cable Routing) steering system that allows the introduction and internal guidance of the rear brake cables, derailleur and seat post from the top of the head tube, leaving a very clean aesthetic on the front of the bicycle. The Crafty Carbon models feature a new redesigned and optimized kinematics especially according to the needs and rigors of an electric mountain bike. The Zero suspension system stands out for a very sensitive initial behavior, more absorbent and with marked progressivity. The upper-link is a Trunnion carbon monoblock that offers better lateral torsion stiffness. The 17mm thru-axles together with the oversized Enduro Max bearings offer more durability, perfect for demanding use and capable of withstanding greater loads. The top of the range model Crafty Carbon RR SL has been created with no compromises, designed for those riders who prioritize maximum lightness and performance over autonomy. It comes equipped with the new Bosch Performance Line CX motor with an integrated 500Wh Powertube battery, and some of the best components on the market such as Fox Factory suspensions, SRAM’s and RockShox’s AXS electronic system, Shimano XTR brakes, e*thirteen carbon cranks, and DT Swiss carbon wheels. A dream build like this only weighs 19.3kg, currently being the lightest electric mountain bike on the market with 29″ wheels and 150mm of rear travel. If equipped with the 625Wh battery, which offers 25% more of autonomy, its weight is still less than 20kg, weighing 19.8kg. In my opinion, it is one of the most beautiful and exclusive electric mountain bikes I’ve seen so far. In Action A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to try the new Crafty Carbon around Gondramaz, a beautiful small town belonging to the Aldeias de Xisto located in the Serra da Lousã, Portugal. Unfortunately, the weather did not cooperate during the test. Heavy rains made the trails complicated, leaving big puddles and a lot of mud, forcing me to be almost more aware of the unknown terrain than the bike itself, trying not to crash as I rode over slippery roots and rocks. Although I could not enjoy the new Crafty Carbon to its full potential, my first impressions were the following: My height is around 1.81m and I tested both size M and L. Taking into account my riding style, I always prioritize the handling and playfulness of a bicycle above all. Considering the geometry numbers and that it has 29” wheels when turning and jumping, I felt more comfortable with an M, unlike with the L, which although it was more stable at high speeds, and perhaps a little more comfortable to pedal, I noticed it felt a bit long for my liking. It was a shame not to be able to try the new Crafty Carbon and enjoy the beautiful landscapes and trails of the Serra da Lousã in better weather conditions, with some more sun and less mud and water, since it seems that Mondraker has created a very capable electric mountain bike. mondraker.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
4 - 25/11/2019 07:01:02

Welcome again to another edition of Flow’s Fresh Produce! Today, our dear readers, marks the start of our final week of spring here Down Under. And you know what that means? That means the summer holidays are just around the corner – yieeeww! To get in the spirit of things, Mick’s been been down in Tassie checking out the Derby round of the 2019 Asia-Pacific Enduro World Series. He also caught up with Thomas Vanderham and Hans Rey, who have both travelled to Oz to see why everyone is frothing over the mountain biking in Derby. Stay tuned for some very entertaining videos and photo stories from those fellas… Of course summer holidays also means we’re getting closer to the C-word (it’s still November, so legally we’re not allowed to say it just yet). For those of you out there with little tackers, you might want to check out our feature on the Kids Ride Shotgun MTB Seat, where we caught up with local rider Dan MacMunn and his little bloke Jack, who’s absolutely loving the chance to hit the singletrack with Dad. Prepare for cuteness overload! Summer riding adventures here we come! There’s been a tonne of other juicy news stories and reviews landing on the website over the past couple of weeks. Marin has launched its new Rift Zone Carbon trail bike, which looks to be killer value for money for the two models that will be available here in Australia. We’ve also published our mid-term review of the 2020 Trek Fuel EX 9.8, as well as a long-term review of some very well-priced alloy wheels from a UK brand called Hunt. Keeping our legs busy for the silly season, we’ve had some new bikes join the Flow test fleet, including a lovely titanium hardtail from Curve, and a bike that has been getting a load of buzz over the past couple of months – the 2020 Giant Reign E+. Rightio, and with y’all up to speed on all things Flow, we can now crack the lid on this week’s bubbly bottle of Fresh Produce. Please enjoy, and as always, hit us up with any questions you’ve got about any of the new products you see here. Orbea Occam M10 Ooph – that’s a good looking rig right there! Basque brand Orbea has garnered plenty of attention over the past couple of seasons as it continues to reinvigorate its mountain bike lineup. The latest bike to get the overhaul treatment is the Occam trail bike, which receives a striking asymmetric chassis that’s available in both alloy and carbon variants. We’ve got the nearly-top-of-the-range M10, so gets the the carbon frameset along with Fox Factory Series suspension, a Shimano Deore XT M8100 groupset, DT Swiss XM-1650 wheels, and carbon Race Face bars. Mick’s already had some quality saddle time on the Occam down in Tassie, so stay tuned for a detailed first look story coming soon. From: Orbea Price: $8,299 Bontrager Rally Mountain Bike Shoes New trail/enduro kicks from Bontrager. What do you think of the blue? Taking styling cues from Bontrager’s Flatline shoe, the Rally is a brand new clip-in version. Designed in conjunction with the Trek Factory Racing enduro and DH race teams, the Rally is a burly flat-soled shoe that offers more traction with big-bodied clip-in pedals by wrapping the composite shank with a full rubber outsole. This makes it more practical for hike-a-biking compared to lean XC shoes, while a recessed cleat pocket sits within a deep channel that’s there to help you clip back in. The Rally features a well-padded synthetic leather upper for comfort, along with reinforced toe and heel caps for protection. There’s also a shock-absorbing EVA midsole, lace-up closure and a big Velcro strap for snugging them down on your feet. Available in three colours (including the TFR signature version shown here), and in sizes from EU 39 through to 48. From: Trek Bikes Price: $219.99 Granite STASH Multi-Tool All of this is designed to sit inside your fork’s steerer tube. Hiding tools and spares on your bike has become increasingly in-vogue in the world of mountain biking, and Granite Designs is the latest brand to get on board the bandwagon with its new STASH tool series. Shown here is the STASH Multi-Tool, which is designed to put a fold-out multi-tool inside the hollow cavity of your fork’s steerer tube – not unlike those from OneUp and Specialized. The Granite version is more like the Specialized SWAT CC tool, in that you don’t need to tap a thread through your fork’s steerer tube. Instead, the whole assembly acts as a compression device to preload the headset bearings, where the lip on the upper part of the tool is designed to sit on top of your stem. The multi-tool then slides out of this upper assembly, with a simple O-ring holding it in place. You’ll find a minimalist spoke key, valve core tool, and 8-piece multi-tool within. From: Link Sports Price: $79.99 Granite STASH Tire Plug Tool More secret STASH tools, this time for your unoccupied handlebar. You get tubeless anchovies, a metal fondue fork, and a metal reamer for performing a trailside tubeless tyre repair. For air-retention based emergencies, Granite offers the STASH Tire Plug Tool, which sits inside one of the ends of your hollow handlebar. Granite includes two sizes of rubber bungs and end caps to suit different thickness bars. Within the tool is both a reamer for cleaning up the puncture, and a fondue prong for inserting one of the four tubeless anchovies to plug up the puncture. From: Link Sports Price: $27.95 Granite STASH Chain Tool Stealthy chain breaker stores inside your bars. And last, but certainly not least, is this stealthy little chain breaker that Granite wants you to stow inside the other end of your handlebars. CNC machined from 7075 alloy, the Chain Tool weighs just 50g and is ready to fit into any handlebar that has an internal diameter of 18-21mm. There’s even machined pockets for clipping in a spare set of quick links. From: Link Sports Price: $34.95 Trek Knock Block Lockring Spacer This lockring spacer keys in with a Trek Knock Block headset. You might have seen Wil’s review of the 2020 Trek Fuel EX 9.8, where he detailed a bunch of changes he’s made to our long-term test bike. One of those changes was a new bar and stem, which necessitated the use of this little Knock Block lockring spacer. This $30 spacer clips into the upper headset, and then tightens down on the steerer tube. This means you maintain the functionality of the Knock Block headset to prevent the over-rotation of the bars (which would see the fork crown hitting the downtube, and the brake/shift levers hitting the top tube), while having a flat spacer top that’s compatible with any regular mountain bike stem. *Note: Trek originally had this spacer listed with a price of $60 AUD. Since publishing the review of the Fuel EX 9.8, Trek contacted us to inform us that they’ve now dropped the price to $30. From: Trek Bikes Price: $30 BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post We’ve got a new 160mm travel dropper post from BikeYoke, which you can internally adjust the travel with by 5mm increments. It was only a few weeks ago that we received the “World’s lightest dropper post“, and we’ve since received another dropper post from German brand BikeYoke. This one is the regular Divine dropper post, which puts less emphasis on the grams, and more on being travel adjustable. That’s right – unlike the vast majority of droppers on the market, the Divine can have its travel reduced internally by the user. BikeYoke includes 4 x 5mm plastic plastic spacers that clip onto the main piston shaft, reducing the maximum travel in 5mm increments up to a maximum of 20mm. Useful for those who want a little less travel, or need to reduce the total extension to suit their saddle height. The BikeYoke Divine dropper post is available in 125mm, 160mm and 185mm travel versions, and you can get it in 30.9mm, 31.6mm and 34.9mm diameters. The Divine is cable activated with ‘stealth’ routing, and BikeYoke offers various handlebar remotes to integrate with Shimano or SRAM brake levers, as well as a standard band clamp version. From: BikeYoke or MTBDirect Price: $555 Stan’s NoTubes DART Tubeless Tyre Repair Tool The new DART tool from Stan’s NoTubes has finally arrived. The flexible rubber plugs have a special coating on them to produce a chemical reaction with the sealant within. It’s finally here! And it’s a little different to what we expected too. This is the Dual Action Repair for Tubeless (DART) tool from Stan’s NoTubes, which was excitedly announced last month. It’s designed to plug up punctures in tubeless tyres, though unlike other solutions out there, the DART is lined with a special compound that’s designed to set off a rapid reaction as soon as latex sealant comes in contact with it. According to Stan’s, this vigorous reaction is supposed to create a faster and more robust seal. As you can probably tell, the production rubber plugs have a different design to the ones shown by Stan’s in the original launch, though they’re still made of a flexible material that Stan’s says you don’t need to trim off after you’ve repaired the puncture. We’re not eager to get a puncture, but we are looking forward to seeing how well the DART tool works on the side of the trail. Stay tuned! From: JetBlack Products Price: $32.95 Stan’s NoTubes DART Refill Pack Stan’s is selling a refill pack. Hopefully we don’t need ALL of them. And likely because the product team at Stan’s NoTubes thinks we’re total riding hacks, we’ve got a 5-pack of spare DARTs to go with our tool. Fingers crossed we don’t have to use ALL of those little plugs – at least not for a while anyway! From: JetBlack Products Price: $24.75 Mo’ Flow Please! Enjoyed that article? Then there’s plenty more to check out on Flow Mountain Bike, including all our latest news stories and product reviews. And if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel, and sign up to our Facebook page and Instagram feed so you can keep up to date with all things Flow! The post Flow’s Fresh Produce | Tubeless Tech, Secret Stash-Tools & An Adjustable Dropper Post appeared first on Flow Mountain Bike.

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
2 - 19/11/2019 08:34:16

Wie lässt sich das Cockpit am Mountainbike aufgeräumter gestalten und die Performance der höhenverstellbaren Sattelstütze auf ein neuen Level heben? Einfach einen besseren Hebel nachrüsten!Wir haben sechs der beliebtesten Remote-Hebel getestet, um herauszufinden, welche Option für eure Teleskopsattelstütze das beste Upgrade darstellt. Wenn ihr bereits unseren Vergleichstest zum Thema „Die beste Teleskopsattelstütze für euer Mountainbike“ gelesen habt, dann werdet ihr wissen, dass nicht alle Remote-Hebel gleich gut sind. In vielen Fällen sind die standardmäßigen Hebel wackelig – auch wenn es an der Funktion grundsätzlich nichts auszusetzen gibt, macht ihr Gebrauch nicht allzu viel Spaß. Viele spezialisierte Komponenten-Hersteller bieten mittlerweile universelle Remote-Hebel zum Nachrüsten an und erlauben es euch so, die Ergonomie nach euren Wünschen anzupassen – für ein Mehr an Performance und Individualität. Wir haben sechs der beliebtesten Optionen ausgewählt und sie auf die Probe gestellt. Wenn ihr bereits unseren Teleskopsattelstützen-Vergleichstest gelesen habt, dann werdet ihr wissen, dass nicht alle Remote-Hebel für Teleskopstützen die gleiche Performance bieten googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Welche Remote-Hebel für Teleskopstützen haben wir getestet? Da es zahllose Remote-Hebel für Teleskopsattelstützen auf dem Markt gibt, haben wir uns auf sechs der gängigsten Modelle für Upgrade-Willige beschränkt. Wolf Tooth Components veröffentlichte möglicherweise als erste Firma eine Nachrüst-Option für Remote-Hebel und wir haben uns dazu entschlossen, sowohl das Modell ReMote als auch ReMote LA (Light Action) zu testen. BikeYoke hat uns mit dem Triggy-Remote-Hebel beeindruckt und OneUP Components bietet mit dem Dropper Post-Remote-Hebel ebenfalls eine vielversprechende und erschwingliche Option. Da so viele Bikes ab Werk mit der FOX Transfer-Sattelstütze ausgestattet sind, haben wir auch den FOX Transfer-Remote-Hebel gegen die Konkurrenz ins Rennen geschickt und waren besonders neugierig darauf, wie er sich gegen den auffallend schön gefertigten PNW Components Loam Lever schlagen würde, der für einen ähnlichen Preis erhältlich ist. BikeYoke Triggy | 25g | 54 € FOX Lever Remote | 28g | 78 € OneUp Remote | 31 g | 45 € PNW Components Loam Lever | 46g | 74 € Wolf Tooth Components ReMote | 32g | 65 € Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA | 35 g | 65 € Warum sollte ich den Remote-Hebel meiner Sattelstütze upgraden? Wenn der Remote-Hebel eurer Teleskopstütze sich im Gebrauch steif und wackelig anfühlt, dann wird ein Upgrade an dieser Stelle euren Daumen verzücken. Die besten Nachrüst-Remote-Hebel für höhenverstellbare Sattelstützen weisen einen längeren Hebel auf, der seidenweich auf einem Lager oder einer Buchse läuft und so maximale Hebelwirkung für eine mühelose Auslösung der Stütze bietet. Die Hebel weisen außerdem ein ergonomisch geformtes Paddel auf, das sich mit eurem Daumen leicht erreichen lässt und über kleine Rillen oder ein griffiges Gummipad verfügt, damit ihr bei Nässe nicht abrutscht. Wenn eure Sattelstütze in einem gut gepflegten Zustand ist, dann wird ein Upgrade des Hebels die Performance noch verbessern und euer Cockpit wird den Neid eurer Mitfahrer auf sich ziehen. Ist der Remote-Hebel überhaupt mit meiner Teleskopstütze kompatibel? Alle Bedienhebel in diesem Vergleichstest verfügen über eine Zug-Klemmvorrichtung, die nicht auf das feste Kabelende bei Schaltzügen angewiesen ist. Das bedeutet, dass die Hebel mit jeder per Zug angesteuerten Sattelstütze funktionieren, unabhängig davon, ob das feste Kabelende am Hebel oder der Stütze selbst befestigt werden muss. Wenn ihr eine hydraulische RockShox Reverb-Teleskopstütze besitzt, dann sind eure Möglichkeiten leider sehr begrenzt, denn nur Wolf Tooth Components und BikeYoke bieten ein Umrüst-Kit an. Doch glücklicherweise ist bereits der ab Werk verbaute 1-fach-Remote-Hebel von RockShox außerordentlich gut. Solltet ihr eine RockShox Reverb besitzen und noch immer den winzigen, zylinderförmigen Daumenhebel verwenden, dann empfehlen wir euch dringend ein Upgrade auf den 1-fach-Remote-Hebel. Alle Remote-Hebel in diesem Test verfügen über eine sichere Zugklemmung, die mit jeder Sattelstütze auf dem Markt funktioniert, die per Kabel angesteuert wird Warum sind alle Remote-Hebel in diesem Test schalthebelartig und für eine Montage unter dem Lenker gedacht? Da 1-fach-Antriebe mittlerweile der Standard bei Trail-, Enduro- und E-Mountainbikes sind, nehmen alle getesteten Bedienhebel den Platz des Schalthebels auf der linken Seite unterhalb des Lenkers ein. Wir glauben, dass auf diese Weise die beste Performance und Ergonomie sowie die komfortabelste Erreichbarkeit während der Fahrt gewährleistet wird. Wenn ihr noch immer mit einem 2-fach-Antrieb unterwegs seid oder ein E-MTB besitzt, das eine große Bedieneinheit für die Unterstützungsstufen nahe des Griffes auf der linken Seite aufweist, dann sind leider kaum Upgrade-Möglichkeiten vorhanden. Fazit – welcher Remote-Hebel für Teleskopsattelstützen ist der beste des Jahres 2019? Nach ausführlichem Testen, Waschen und gelegentlichen Baumkontakten haben wir schließlich unser Fazit ziehen können. Mit Ausnahme des FOX Transfer-Remote-Hebels haben sich alle Bedienhebel in diesem Test keinerlei Blöße geleistet und stellen ein fantastisches Upgrade für alle dar, die die originalen Hebel ihrer Teleskopstützen optimieren wollen. Der BikeYoke Triggy ist perfekt geeignet für Fahrer, die auf der Suche nach niedrigem Gewicht und spitzenmäßiger Ergonomie sind, wohingegen der Remote-Hebel von OneUp einen super Grip sowie Performance zu einem erschwinglichen Preis bietet und sich daher unseren KAUFTIPP-Award schnappt. Der Kampf um den Sieg tobte schließlich zwischen dem exzellenten Wolf Tooth Components ReMote und dem PNW Components Loam Lever. Auch wenn der PNW Components Loam Lever schwerer ist, machen seine robuste Konstruktion und die clevere Lagerabdeckung ihn zu einem äußerst attraktiven Hebel. Doch den hochverdienten TESTSIEG sichert sich Wolf Tooth Components mit einem begeisternden Preis-Leistungs-Verhältnis, einer Fülle an Ersatzteilen und einer einzigartigen Sollbruchstelle zwischen Hebel und Klemme, die den Hebel bei einem heftigen Crash schützt. Testsieger: Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA im Test Für alle, die eine leichtgängige Hebelfunktion und maximale Kontrolle wünschen, bietet Wolf Tooth Components den ReMote LA mit einem längeren Hebel für verringerte Bedienkräfte an, aber funktioniert das Ganze auch? Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA | 35 g | 65 € Der 35 g leichte Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA-Hebel verfügt über alles, was schon den standardmäßigen Wolf Tooth ReMote ausgezeichnet hat, zusätzlich nun aber über einen längeren 57,1-mm-Hebel, wodurch die benötigte Kraft zum Auslösen um über 25 % verringert wird. Der längere und aus 6061-T6-Aluminium gefertigte Hebel bietet ein besseres Hebelverhältnis. Dies resultiert in einer super leichtgängigen Funktion, die es noch dazu einfacher macht, die Bewegung der Stütze „abzufedern“ und sie in der Mitte ihres Verstellweges zu stoppen. Der Remote-Hebel verfügt über eine geräumige und sichere 3-mm-Kabelklemmung und ist kompatibel mit allen per Kabel angesteuerten Teleskopsattelstützen. Die Klemmung weist eine Vertiefung auf, um zu verhindern, dass das Kabelende platt gedrückt und beschädigt wird. Das große gedichtete 21-mm-Industrielager sorgt für einen butterweichen Betrieb, ohne jegliches Wackeln oder Spiel. Der gefräste, durch feine Rillen aufgeraute Hebel bietet eine Menge Grip, auch wenn er nicht ganz so griffig ist wie das konkave OneUp-Paddel. Ein Feature, das uns besonders gefällt, ist die günstige, austauschbare Plastikachse, die so konzipiert ist, dass sie bei Krafteinwirkungen bricht und so den Hebel im Falle eines Crashs schützt. Der Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA ist erhältlich mit Adaptern für Shimano I-SPEC A, B, EV und II, SRAM MMX, MAGURA, Hope sowie einer standardmäßigen zweiteiligen 22,2-mm-Lenkerklemme. Nutzt man die 22,2-mm-Klemme, erhält man einen zusätzlichen seitlichen Verstellweg, da der Hebel in einer kleinen Schiene um ca. 1 cm verschoben werden kann. Im Betrieb überzeugt der Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA mit einer seidenweichen Funktion, die ein fantastisches Upgrade für jede Stütze darstellt. Der Wolf Tooth Components LA-Remote-Hebel ist in der Farbe „stealth black“ erhältlich, sowie in limitierter Auflage in drei weiteren Farben. Die 3-mm-Kabelklemmung am Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA beschädigt das Kabel nicht und ist widerstandsfähiger gegenüber einem „Runddrehen“ der Schraubenköpfe als die winzigen 2-mm-Madenschrauben Mit seinem großen 21-mm-Lager bietet der Wolf Tooth Components ReMote-Hebel eine wunderbar leichtgängige Funktion Fazit Wenn ihr eine super leichtgängige Funktion, gepaart mit einer spitzenmäßigen Ergonomie wünscht, dann stellt der Wolf Tooth Components ReMote LA ein grandioses Upgrade für jede per Kabel angesteuerte Teleskopstütze dar. Mit seinem längeren Hebel, verglichen mit dem standardmäßigen ReMote-Hebel, ist er die perfekte Wahl für Fahrer, die ihre Sattelstütze gern in verschiedenen Positionen federleicht zum Stehen bringen. Was uns jedoch am meisten überzeugt, ist die Verfügbarkeit von Ersatzteilen sowie die Sollbruchstelle an der Achse, die sich bei einem Crash „opfert“ und den teuren Hebel damit schützt – unser TESTSIEGER. Stärkenseidenweiche Funktionlanger Hebel erleichtert die ModulationSchwächenLager ungeschützt Mehr Infos findet ihr unter: wolftoothcomponents.com Kauftipp: OneUp Dropper Post Remote-Hebel im Test Erschwinglich, qualitativ hochwertig und mit einer erstklassigen Performance gesegnet – den OneUp Dropper Post-Remote-Hebel muss man einfach mögen, doch wie schlägt er sich gegen seine Konkurrenz? OneUp Remote | 31 g | 45 € Der 31 g leichte OneUp Dropper Post-Remote-Hebel gefällt uns in vielerlei Hinsicht. Zunächst einmal funktioniert er – dank der Kabelklemmung am Hebel – mit jeder mittels Kabelzug angesteuerten Sattelstütze. Weiterhin läuft er auf einem überdimensionierten Lager und bietet eine solide und äußerst geschmeidige Funktion. Der Hebelarm sitzt ein wenig höher als bei den meisten anderen Optionen und ähnelt damit eher der Position des standardmäßigen, rechtsseitigen Triggers zum Hochschalten als dem Paddel zum Herunterschalten. Diese Position zu erreichen, erfordert weniger Bewegung des Daumens und wir sind wirklich begeistert von dem konkav geformten und geriffelten Daumen-Paddel, das somit einen super sicheren Grip bietet. Der Hebel ist erhältlich mit Adaptern für Shimano I-SPEC II, SRAM MMX oder als standardmäßige 22,2-mm-Lenkerklemme und verfügt über drei Positionen zur seitlichen Einstellbarkeit. Auf dem Trail haben wir keinerlei Probleme mit dem OneUp Dropper Post-Remote-Hebel gehabt und seine Funktion ist geschmeidig und wackelfrei. Das konkav geformte und geriffelte Paddel des OneUp Dropper Post-Remote-Hebels bietet den sichersten Halt von allen Hebeln im Test Dank seines großen Lagers lief der OneUp Dropper Post-Remote-Hebel ohne Wackeln Fazit Der OneUp Dropper Post-Remote-Hebel ist perfekt geeignet für alle, die sich einen kompakten und hochgradig taktilen Bedienhebel wünschen. Das konkave, geriffelte Paddel vermittelt fantastisches und fühlbares Feedback sowie Grip auch bei Nässe. Für erschwingliche 45,50 € ist der OneUp-Hebel unser KAUFTIPP und eine großartige Wahl, wenn ihr nach einem Upgrade für euren Remote-Hebel sucht. Stärkengriffiges PaddelerschwinglichSchwächenhoch sitzender Hebel könnte nicht jedem gefallen Mehr Infos findet ihr unter: oneupcomponents.com BikeYoke Triggy-Remote-Hebel im Test BikeYoke hat den Fokus schon immer auf clevere ingenieurtechnische Lösungen für Probleme am Bike gelegt. Der Triggy-Remote-Hebel bildet da keine Ausnahme und nutzt ein intelligentes Design, um sein Gewicht zu reduzieren und ein Maximum an Performance zu liefern. BikeYoke Triggy | 25g | 54 € Wie alle Remote-Hebel in diesem Vergleichstest ist auch der BikeYoke Triggy mit allen Kabelzug-aktivierten Sattelstützen kompatibel. Die Konstruktion aus 6061-T6-Aluminium ist äußerst gelungen, mit abgerundeten Kanten und umfangreichen Aussparungen, damit das Gewicht auf ein Minimum reduziert wird. Mit lediglich 25 g ist er in der Tat leicht. Der BikeYoke Triggy-Hebel bietet weiterhin zwei verschiedene Befestigungspunkte, sodass ihr seine horizontale Position feiner einstellen könnt. Anders als die Hebel von Wolf Tooth Components und PNW Components nutzt der Triggy statt eines Lagers eine Buchse. Die Fertigungstoleranzen fallen sehr genau aus, sodass am Hebel keinerlei Wackeln oder Spiel spürbar ist. Der Triggy ist erhältlich mit Shimano I-SPEC B bzw. II-Adaptern und kann direkt an der SRAM MMX-Klemme befestigt werden. Eine 22,2-mm-Lenkerklemme ist natürlich ebenfalls verfügbar. Auch wenn sie sich nicht komplett aufklappen lässt, so ist sie flexibel genug, um die Griffe nicht abnehmen zu müssen. Im Gebrauch entwickelt sich selbst nach härtesten Misshandlungen keinerlei Spiel in der Buchse. Unser einziger kleiner Kritikpunkt lautet, dass das Paddel nicht das griffigste seiner Art darstellt und bei Nässe gar ein wenig rutschig ist. Die Aussparungen halten zwar das Gewicht niedrig, doch ohne sonstige Rillen oder Noppen tragen sie nicht zur Verbesserung des Grips bei. Die winzigen Löcher im Paddel helfen zwar bei der Reduktion des Gewichts, tragen jedoch ohne sonstige Rillen oder Noppen nicht zum besseren Grip bei Das Kabel wird mit einer innenliegenden Madenschraube gesichert Fazit Der BikeYoke Triggy-Remote-Hebel dürfte Ingenieuren und Bikern gefallen, die eine top Performance bei minimalem Gewicht suchen. Der Triggy-Hebel ist ein fantastisches Upgrade gegenüber einem Standard-Hebel, denn er ist schick, kompakt und ergonomisch. Stärkenleichtgewichtig und elegantkeinerlei Wackeln oder SpielSchwächenPaddel fehlt es an Grip Mehr Infos findet ihr unter: www.bikeyoke.de googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); FOX Transfer Lever Remote-Hebel im Test Wir lieben die FOX Transfer-Teleskopsattelstütze, die allein oder mit zwei zur Auswahl stehenden Hebeln verkauft wird. Wir haben den Standard-Remote-Hebel getestet, um zu sehen, ob er mit der Qualität der zugehörigen Teleskopstütze mithalten kann. FOX Lever Remote| 28g | 78 € Schon seit ihrem Erscheinen im Jahr 2016 sind wir Fans der FOX Transfer Factory-Teleskopsattelstütze. Doch während die Transfer-Stütze noch immer in der obersten Liga mitspielt, kann der 79,00 € teure Remote-Hebel nicht mehr mithalten. Mit lediglich 28 g fällt er zwar sehr leicht aus und die sauber integrierte Kabelklemmung ist gewiss minimalistisch sowie kompatibel mit allen Teleskopstützen. Zudem bietet der Hebel eine gute Funktion, die eine saubere Modulation der Stütze ermöglicht – doch das war‘s auch schon mit den positiven Seiten. Da der FOX Transfer-Hebel lediglich an einem simplen Drehgelenk ohne Lager befestigt ist, wackelt er und fühlt sich im Gebrauch äußerst billig an. Dem kleinen Paddel mit seinen winzigen Vertiefungen fehlt es außerdem an gutem Grip und angenehmer Haptik. Verglichen mit der ähnlich teuren Konkurrenz ist der FOX Transfer Lever-Remote-Hebel eine schlechte Wahl und nur für jene geeignet, die auf kompletten Minimalismus stehen. Das Kabel wird mit einer winzigen Madenschraube im Hebel geklemmt Da der Hebel nicht über ein vernünftiges Lager bzw. eine Buchse verfügt, fühlt er sich wackelig und billig an Fazit Auch wenn die FOX Transfer-Sattelstütze noch immer ganz oben mitspielt, versprüht ihr standardmäßig verbauter FOX-Remote-Hebel nicht das gleiche qualitativ hochwertige Feeling. Wenn ihr euch eine neue FOX Transfer zulegen wollt, dann würden wir sie stets mit einem anderen Remote-Hebel paaren. StärkenkompaktSchwächenfühlt sich wackelig und billig ankleine Madenschraube zur Klemmung des Kabelsteuer! Mehr Infos findet ihr unter: ridefox.com PNW Components Loam Lever-Remote-Hebel im Test Die Glückssträhne von PNW Components geht weiter. Schon die Bachelor-Teleskopsattelstütze fanden wir außerordentlich gut, doch was uns bei unserem Teleskopstützen-Vergleichstest am meisten beeindruckt hat, war der robuste Loam Lever. Er ist so konstruiert, dass er einfach alles übersteht – und wir haben ihn wahrlich auf die Probe gestellt. PNW Components Loam Lever | 46g | 74 € Der 46 g leichte PNW Components Loam Lever ist ein wahrhaft robuster Teleskopstützen-Remote-Hebel. Diesen CNC-gefrästen Hebel zu benutzen, ist eine absolute Freude, auch dank der engen Fertigungstoleranzen. Ein weiteres cooles Feature am PNW Loam Lever ist, dass das Spritzguss-Gummipad am Hebel in fünf verschiedenen Farben erhältlich ist und es euch somit erlaubt, eine zu eurem Bike passende Auswahl zu treffen. Der Hebel verfügt über eine strapazierfähige 3-mm-Schraube an der Kabelklemmung und ist kompatibel mit allen Sattelstützen, die per Kabelzug aktiviert werden. Der Hebel ist 59 mm lang und benötigt die gleiche leichtgängige Auslösekraft wie der Wolf Tooth Light Action-Remote-Hebel. Außerdem läuft auch der Loam Lever auf einem großen 21-mm-Lager, wodurch seine Funktion unglaublich smooth ist. Der lange Hebel sorgt dafür, dass es ein Leichtes ist, die Position der Stütze im Verlauf ihres Verstellweges genauestens zu wählen und macht es damit weitaus leichter, eine Sattelhöhe im mittleren Verstellbereich zu erreichen. Auf dem Trail sorgt das Gummipad mit Handschuhen für einen super Grip – allerdings nicht ganz so griffig wie mit den geriffelten Optionen von OneUp und Wolf Tooth. Die Verarbeitungsqualität ist über jeden Zweifel erhaben: Keinerlei Spiel oder Wackeln stören den Betrieb und selbst nach einigen heftigen Einschlägen auf dem Trail hat sich der Hebel als äußerst widerstandsfähig erwiesen. Der Loam Lever-Remote-Hebel ist mit Adaptern für Shimano I-SPEC II, SRAM MMX sowie einer standardmäßigen 22,2-mm-Lenkerklemmung erhältlich. Er verfügt zudem über zwei Positionen, um den seitlichen Sitz des Hebels einstellen zu können. Einzigartig am Loam Lever ist die zusätzliche Anschlagschraube, die euch den Winkel des Hebels nach vorn und nach hinten kippen lässt, wie bei der Hebelweitenverstellung von Bremsen. Ein vollständiges Cover über der Lager-Unterseite sorgt außerdem für maximalen Schutz für das gedichtete 21-mm-Lager und rundet das fantastische Paket ab. Das Spritzguss-Gummipad ist in fünf verschiedenen Farben erhältlich Das gedichtete 21-mm-Lager wird von einem robusten Cover geschützt Fazit Der PNW Components Loam Lever-Remote-Hebel ist mit seiner fantastischen Verarbeitungsqualität sowie seinem coolen Look ein exzellentes Upgrade für jede Teleskopstütze. Der lange Hebel bietet ein Maximum an Kontrolle bei minimalem Widerstand und sein vollständig abgedichtetes Lager ist für all diejenigen ein dicker Bonus, die viel bei Nässe unterwegs sind. StärkenGummipad bringt etwas Farbe ins Spielrobuste Konstruktiongeschütztes LagerSchwächenschwerster Hebel im Test Mehr Infos findet ihr unter: pnwcomponents.com Wolf Tooth Components ReMote-Hebel im Test Wolf Tooth Components ist womöglich der erste Hersteller, der einem in den Sinn kommt, wenn es um Upgrades für Teleskopstützen-Remote-Hebel geht. Wir haben den originalen ReMote-Hebel auf die Probe gestellt und ihn gegen seine Konkurrenz antreten lassen. Wolf Tooth Components ReMote | 32g | 65 € Der 32g leichte Wolf Tooth Components ReMote-Hebel ist der originale Remote-Hebel von Wolf Tooth Components und stellt mit seinem kürzeren Hebel eine kompaktere Option dar als das LA-Modell. Der 46,3 mm lange Hebel aus 6061-T6-Aluminium bietet ein ausreichendes Hebelverhältnis für die meisten Stützen und gewährt eine schnelle und satte Funktion. Der Hebel verfügt außerdem über eine große und sichere 3-mm-Kabelklemmung und ist kompatibel mit jeder Teleskopstütze, die per Zug angesteuert wird. Die Vertiefung in der Klemmung verhindert bei der Installation des Kabels ein Plattdrücken oder Beschädigen. Wie auch beim LA-Modell arbeitet dieser Hebel mit dem gleichen gedichteten 21-mm-Industrielager seidenweich und ohne jegliches Wackeln oder Spiel. Und auch das günstige, austauschbare Plastik-Bauteil, das sich bei einem Aufprall „opfert“ und mit seiner Sollbruchstelle den Hebel schützt, ist identisch. Die Oberfläche des gefrästen Hebels ist super griffig gearbeitet und bietet dem Daumen hervorragenden Halt. Übrigens: Dass es sich bei der Behauptung, der lasergravierte Wolfskopf auf dem Hebel mache einen mindestens 5 % schneller, um ein Gerücht handelt, lehnen wir entschieden ab. Der Wolf Tooth ReMote-Hebel ist erhältlich mit Adaptern für Shimano I-SPEC A, B, EV sowie II, SRAM MMX, MAGURA, Hope und natürlich auch mit einer standardmäßigen geteilten 22,2-mm-Lenkerklemme. Bei dieser kann der Hebel sogar in einer kleinen Schiene um ca. 1 cm zur Seite verschoben werden. Auf dem Trail bietet der Wolf Tooth ReMote eine schnellere Auslösung sowie sattere Rückmeldung als das LA-Modell und ist daher perfekt für all jene, die ihre Sattelstütze entweder komplett ausgefahren oder vollständig versenkt nutzen. Der Remote-Hebel von Wolf Tooth Components ist in „stealth black“ sowie in vier weiteren, jedoch limitierten, Farben erhältlich. Die 3-mm-Schraube zur Kabelklemmung ist deutlich widerstandsfähiger gegenüber Abnutzung als die 2-mm-Madenschrauben, die bei einigen Hebeln verwendet werden Das 21-mm-Lager läuft butterweich, ist jedoch nicht wie beim PNW Components Loam Lever vor Schmutz geschützt Fazit Dank seines 21-mm-Lagers bietet der Wolf Tooth ReMote-Hebel eine seidenweiche Funktion. Er reagiert schneller als das LA-Modell und ist daher die perfekte Wahl für Fahrer, die mit ihrer Sattelstütze schnellstmöglich zwischen dem komplett aus- und eingefahrenen Zustand wechseln wollen. Stärkenseidenweicher Betriebäußerst satte FunktionSchwächenungeschütztes Lager Mehr Infos findet ihr unter: wolftoothcomponents.com Eure Stütze und deren Hebel sind an sich neu aber funktionieren nicht richtig? Dann dürft ihr unseren Service-Artikel für Dropper Posts nicht verpassen. Und falls das alles nicht hilft, dann solltet ihr euch vielleicht nach einer neuen Sattelstütze umschauen. Einen Überblick über alle aktuellen findet ihr in unserem Vergleichstest der besten Teleksopsattelstützen.

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
8 - 19/11/2019 08:34:16

In diesem Jahr hat sich auf dem Markt der Teleskopsattelstützen eine Menge getan: neue Anbieter, neue Technologien und mehr Verstellweg als je zuvor. Wir sagen euch, worauf es bei der Auswahl einer neuen höhenverstellbaren Sattelstütze wirklich ankommt und welches Modell für euch am besten geeignet ist. Bei so vielen neuen Gesichtern auf dem Markt haben schlechte Sattelstützen keine Chance mehr. Teleskopsattelstützen müssen sowohl eine erstklassige Performance als auch tadellose Zuverlässigkeit bieten. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Teleskopstützen 2.0 – mehr Verstellweg, günstiger und sogar drahtlos In unserem Teleskopstützen-Test aus dem Jahr 2017 haben wir noch verkündet: „Warum sind in diesem Vergleichstest keine drahtlosen Sattelstützen zu finden? Drahtlose, elektronische Teleskopsattelstützen sind die Zukunft, doch aktuell bieten sie nicht dieselbe Leistung wie traditionelle Modelle.“ Die Zukunft ist jetzt. RockShox hat die elektronische Reverb AXS-Teleskopsattelstütze veröffentlicht, drahtlose Technik ist also hier und funktioniert herausragend, doch ist das Ganze wirklich 800 € wert? Auch neue Akteure haben mit ausgezeichneten klassischen Optionen die Bühne betreten: Die Sattelstützen von PNW, OneUp und Yep haben alle etwas Einzigartiges zu bieten. Der Verstellweg der Sattelstützen hat sich erhöht, die neuen, langen und flachen Rahmengeometrien haben uns niedrigere Überstandshöhen beschert und die Stützen sind generell kompakter geworden. So lassen sich 170 mm Verstellweg mittlerweile in denselben Abmessungen unterbringen wie ältere 150-mm-Modelle – und es gibt sogar Sattelstützen, die sich bis zu 258 mm ausfahren bzw. absenken lassen! Wenn ihr auf der Suche nach einer neuen Teleskopstütze seid oder einfach mehr Verstellweg hinzugewinnen wollt, dann liefern wir euch mit diesem Test die nötige Hilfe und Orientierung. In dieser Kaufempfehlung werden wir euch erklären, welche Eigenschaften eine gute höhenverstellbare Sattelstütze ausmachen, bevor wir die Frage nach der besten Teleskopsattelstütze auf dem Markt beantworten. Falls ihr noch weitere Fragen zu Sattelstützen habt oder auf der Suche nach einer neuen Remote seid, dann findet ihr alle Antworten in den FAQ am Ende dieses Artikels. Worauf kommt es bei einer guten Teleskopsattelstütze an? Eine gute Teleskopstütze sollte einmal montiert werden und dann völlig sang- und klanglos ihren Dienst verrichten. Sie sollte sich leicht installieren lassen, nur einen minimalen Wartungsaufwand erfordern und zu 100 % zuverlässig sein. Die besten Sattelstützen besitzen zudem einen ergonomischen Hebel, der mit den bereits am Lenker vorhandenen Bedienelementen harmoniert und sich leicht montieren lässt. Der Hebel sollte zudem leichtgängig und butterweich in der Bedienung sein und außerdem sensibel genug, um die Sattelstütze an jedem Punkt ihres Verstellwegs stoppen zu können (Falls ihr mit eurem Hebel nicht zufrieden seid oder nach einem Upgrade sucht, dann sollte ihr unseren Vergleichstest zu den besten Dropper Post-Remotes nicht verpassen.). Die besten Teleskopstützen weisen darüber hinaus eine kompakte Bauform auf, denn dadurch können auch Fahrer mit kurzen Beinen mehr Verstellweg aus dem limitierten Platzangebot zwischen Sattelklemme und Sattel herausholen. Und schließlich sollte der Kopf der Teleskopstütze so konstruiert sein, dass man nicht die Geschicklichkeit eines Hirnchirurgen und die Arme eines Oktopus braucht, um den Sattel zu befestigen. Mittlerweile sind 1-fach-Antriebe der Standard an Bikes, wodurch Remotes im Stil eines Schalthebels – links unter dem Lenker montiert – die gängigste Wahl für Teleskopsattelstützen darstellen Welche Arten von höhenverstellbaren Sattelstützen gibt es? Nahezu alle modernen Teleskopsattelstützen besitzen eine interne Zugführung, wobei das Kabel an der Unterseite der Sattelstütze befestigt wird – sicher und gut versteckt im Inneren des Rahmens. Während die Installation und Einstellung dieser Sattelstützen etwas mehr Zeit in Anspruch nimmt, sind sie – einmal montiert – weitgehend wartungsfrei. Nahezu alle High-End-Bikes besitzen mittlerweile eine Öffnung für eine innenverlegte Sattelstütze und die Auswahl an extern angesteuerten Modellen (bei denen das Kabel an der Teleskopsattelstütze außerhalb des Rahmens befestigt wird) nimmt stetig ab. Alle Sattelstützen verfügen über einen Bedienhebel, der sich am anderen Ende des Kabels befindet und am Lenker befestigt wird. Mit diesem Hebel lässt sich die Sattelstütze auf drei Arten ansteuern. Am verbreitetsten ist die Variante, bei der ein Edelstahl-Schaltzug dazu genutzt wird, die Sattelstütze zu aktivieren. Der Vorteil dieses Systems ist, dass Ersatz-Schaltzüge günstig und einfach zu bekommen sind. Der Nachteil: Mit der Zeit korrodieren die Züge und müssen ersetzt werden. Außerdem mögen die Züge aus Stahl es ganz und gar nicht, wenn sie im Inneren des Rahmens stark geknickt werden. Einzigartig an der weitverbreiteten RockShox Reverb ist ihre hydraulische Ansteuerung: Anstelle eines Kabels ist der Schlauch hier mit Mineralöl gefüllt, um die Sattelstütze hydraulisch zu aktivieren. Von Vorteil ist hierbei, dass nichts korrodieren kann und auch enge Windungen im Rahmeninneren kein Problem darstellen. Allerdings muss das System, wie bei Scheibenbremsen, entlüftet werden, da Luft hineingelangen kann. Mittlerweile gibt es noch eine weitere spannende Kategorie: die drahtlose Ansteuerung, bei der die Sattelstütze ohne jegliche physische Verbindung zwischen der Teleskopstütze und dem Hebel aktiviert wird. MAGURA bietet bereits seit einigen Jahren die Vyron an, doch das leicht verzögerte Aktivieren der Stütze nach Betätigung des Hebels konnte uns auf dem Trail bisher nie überzeugen. Die neue RockShox Reverb AXS bietet nun endlich eine verzögerungsfreie Betätigung und hebt drahtlose Sattelstützen damit auf ein völlig neues Level. Der Aufbau einer Teleskopsattelstütze Obwohl sie auf den ersten Blick simple Komponenten sind, verfügen viele höhenverstellbare Sattelstützen über einige Features, die das Nutzungserlebnis verbessern können. Verstellbare Ausfahrgeschwindigkeit Einige der besten Teleskopsattelstützen erlauben es, die Ausfahrgeschwindigkeit der Sattelstütze einzustellen und so auf den eigenen Fahrstil abzustimmen – von langsam und träge bis hin zu kronjuwelengefährdend schnell! Bei einigen Sattelstützen lässt sich die Geschwindigkeit am Hebel einstellen, bei anderen über eine Veränderung des Luftdrucks in der Stütze selbst, und wieder andere Modelle verfügen lediglich über eine Ausfahrgeschwindigkeit. Stufenlose Höhenverstellung Einige Sattelstützen haben vorbestimmte Einrastpunkte am obersten und untersten Ende sowie in ihrer Mitte, wenngleich die meisten Modelle eine stufenlose Einstellung der Höhe bieten. Die stufenlose Höhenverstellung erlaubt es, die Sattelstütze an jeglichem Punkt ihres Verstellwegs zu stoppen und so die Sitzhöhe während der Fahrt genauestens zu justieren. Remote-Hebel Alle Sattelstützen in diesem Test verfügen über einen Hebel, der am Lenker angebracht wird, wodurch ihr die Teleskopsattelstütze absenken könnt, ohne eure Hände von den Griffen nehmen zu müssen. Mit der allgemeinen Zunahme von 1-fach-Antrieben funktionieren die Hebel am besten. Sie lassen sich wie Schalthebel betätigen und ermöglichen einen funktionellen und ergonomischen Betrieb. Stack-Höhe Die Stack-Höhe bezeichnet den Überstand der Sattelstütze über dem Rahmen in ihrer niedrigsten Position. Unterschiede im Design und in der Klemmvorrichtung für den Sattel haben zur Folge, dass manche Sattelstützen länger oder kürzer ausfallen als andere. Die besten Teleskopsattelstützen weisen nur noch geringe Stack-Höhen auf und ermöglichen euch somit, mehr Verstellweg innerhalb von weniger Raum unterzubringen. Durchmesser der Sattelstütze Die meisten Teleskopstützen sind mit einem Durchmesser von 30,9 bzw. 31,6 mm sowie gelegentlich auch 34,9 mm erhältlich, wodurch sie in die meisten aktuellen Rahmen passen. Reduzierhülsen können benutzt werden, um den Durchmesser der Sattelstützen zu erhöhen, damit sie auch in einen Rahmen mit einem breiteren Sattelrohr passen. Eine zu dicke Sattelstütze passt jedoch nicht in einen Rahmen mit einem zu schmalen Sattelrohr. Verstellweg Teleskopstützen sind mit einem breiten Spektrum an Verstellweg erhältlich, von 100 mm bis hin zu sagenhaften 258 mm. Das Ziel für die meisten Fahrer sollte sein, so viel Verstellweg wie möglich in ihrem Rahmen unterzubringen. Limitiert wird das Ganze von der Länge des Sattelrohrs, der Konstruktion der Sattelstütze sowie der Beinlänge des Fahrers. Kartusche Im Inneren der meisten Sattelstützen arbeitet eine hydraulische Kartusche mit einer Luftfeder, die unter Druck steht. Betätigt man den Hebel, fährt sie die Sattelstütze aus. Zu dem System gehört auch eine mit Öl gefüllte Dämpfung, welche die Bewegungen der Sattelstütze geschmeidiger werden lässt. Einige Sattelstützen lassen sich daheim warten, während andere so konzipiert sind, dass sie für einen Service zurück zum Hersteller müssen. Gewicht Teleskopsattelstützen werden immer leichter und doch gibt es erhebliche Unterschiede zwischen den verschiedenen Herstellern. Eine gute Sattelstütze sollte möglichst leicht und zugleich zuverlässig sein. Sattelklemmung am Stützenkopf Nicht alle Sattelklemmungen am Stützenkopf sind gleich. Die Montage eines Sattels an einigen der Sattelstützen im Test erfordert die Geschicklichkeit eines Hirnchirurgen und mindestens zwölf Finger. Eine gute Sattelklemmung ermöglicht hingegen die Montage des Sattels mit minimaler Anstrengung – und ebenso leicht sollte man den Winkel und die Position des Sattels unabhängig voneinander verstellen können. Weitere Informationen und Fragen rund um Dropper Posts haben wir in unserer FAQ am Ende der Seite erklärt. Welche Modelle haben wir getestet? Für jedes Budget gibt es heutzutage eine Vielzahl an passenden Teleskopstützen. So gern wir das auch gewollt hätten, bei einer derartigen Vielzahl an Optionen und einem langen Testzeitraum ist es schlicht nicht möglich, alle Modelle in allen Varianten zu testen. Generell lässt sich sagen: Je günstiger eine Teleskopsattelstütze ist, desto kürzer ist oft auch ihr Verstellweg – außerdem sind diese Modelle oft schwer und besitzen eine hohe Stack-Höhe. In unseren Augen sollten 150 mm für durchschnittlich große Fahrer als die minimale Absenktiefe zum Trail-Biken angesehen werden. Da die modernen Rahmengeometrien immer niedriger werden, dürften sogar 170 mm für viele Fahrer eine Option sein. Bei diesem Test haben wir alle Teleskopstützen außen vor gelassen, die weniger als 150 mm Verstellweg bieten, und uns stattdessen auf höhenverstellbare Sattelstützen konzentriert, die in einem breiten Spektrum an Längen verfügbar sind und somit auch zu einer größeren Zahl an Fahrern passen. Mittlerweile gibt es übrigens auch leichtgewichtige Optionen mit geringer Absenktiefe für XC-Fahrer. Doch obwohl diese Modelle sicherlich interessant sind, haben wir solche Sattelstützen nicht in diesen Test aufgenommen. Während unserer Tests teilten sich alle Sattelstützen eine Eigenschaft: ihre immense Zuverlässigkeit. Selbst nach Tausenden Stunden geballter Tests begegneten uns nur äußerst wenige Probleme. Stütze Preis1 Gesamtlänge2 Maximale Einstecktiefe3 Fahrhöhe4 Stack-Höhe5 Hub [mm] Gewicht (inkl. Hebel) Mechanismus BikeYoke REVIVE (Test hier) 434 € (mit Triggy) 520 mm 290 mm 206 mm 45 mm 125 – 160 – 185 583 g Kabel FOX Transfer Factory (Test hier) 429 €/69 € 530 mm 300 mm 205 mm 60 mm 100 – 125 – 150 – 175 583 g Kabel KS LEV Si (Test hier) 260 €/39 € 500 mm 275 mm 200 mm 50 mm 65 – 75 – 100 – 125 – 150 – 175 589 g Kabel OneUp V2 (Test hier) 209 €/45,50 € 550 mm 300 mm 255 mm 40 mm 120 – 150 – 180 – 210 594 g Kabel PNW Bachelor (Test hier) 255 €/74 € 500 mm 275 mm 225 mm 57 mm 125 – 150 – 170 – 200 590 g Kabel RockShox Reverb AXS (Test hier) 800 € 470 mm 245 mm 190 mm 75 mm 100 – 125 – 150 – 170 650 g Wireless RockShox Reverb C1 (Test hier) 445 € 510 mm 275 mm 205 mm 63 mm 100 – 125 – 150 – 175 – 200 585 g Hydraulisch Yep Uptimizer HC 2.0 (Test hier) 380 € 535 mm 290 mm 205 mm 52 mm 80 – 100 – 125 – 155 – 185 573 g Kabel Ihr seid euch nicht sicher, ob die Sattelstütze eurer Wahl in euer Mountainbike passt? Dann lasst euch von Trev verraten, worauf man bei der Montage einer längeren Sattelstütze achten muss. Du hast die Sattelstütze, die dich interessiert nicht gefunden? Hier sind alle höhenverstellbaren Sattelstützen, die wir in den letzten Jahren getestet haben und die nicht ihren Weg in unseren aktuellen Vergleichstest gefunden haben: e*thirteen TRS+ Test | Brand-X Ascend Test | 9Point8 Fall Line Test | Crankbrothers Highline Test | Easton Haven Test | PRO Koryak ASP Test | RockShox Reverb Stealth Test | Magura Vyron Test Wie haben wir die Teleskopsattelstützen getestet? Sattelstützen sind möglicherweise die am schwierigsten zu testenden Komponenten an einem Bike. Anders als bei einem Bike selbst kann ihre Performance nicht relativ schnell auf einem Trail „gemessen“ werden. Eine gute Teleskopsattelstütze soll nicht nur bestens funktionieren, sondern – und das ist ganz entscheidend – sie muss zuverlässig sein! Sie soll glänzen durch ihre unauffällige Funktion. Die einzige Möglichkeit, sie zu testen, ist daher ein langfristiges Prozedere. Auch wenn wir an Modelljahre gebunden sind, haben wir uns bemüht, die getesteten Teleskopstützen so lange wie möglich an unseren Test-Bikes montiert zu haben, und jede Sattelstütze in diesem Test hat wenigstens 5 Monate auf dem Trail verbracht, einige sogar beträchtlich länger. Sie wurden hart rangenommen, die Bikes wurden an ihren Sätteln aufgehängt, die Dichtungen haben einiges an Nässe gesehen und Sättel wurden ausgetauscht. Wenn man die Sattelstützen daheim warten konnte, haben wir auch das getan, um herauszufinden, wie bedienerfreundlich sich ein Service durchführen lässt. Wir haben versucht zusammenzuzählen, wie viele Fahrstunden in die Produktion dieses Tests flossen, aber irgendwann haben wir den Überblick verloren. Mit Sicherheit waren es über 1.000 Stunden voller Auf und Ab (jep, das Wortspiel war beabsichtigt). Außerdem interessant: Obwohl wir mehr Teststunden absolviert haben als in unserem 2017er Vergleichstest, haben wir weitaus weniger technische Defekte und Zuverlässigkeitsprobleme erlebt. Das zeigt, wie die Hersteller die Teleskopsattelstützen weiterentwickeln, damit sie noch zuverlässiger werden. Die beste Sattelstütze – RockShox Reverb AXS Drahtlose Integration ist die Zukunft. Wenn ihr auf der Suche nach der reibungslosesten Funktion, der leichtesten Auslösung und der simpelsten Installation seid, dann kauft die RockShox Reverb AXS. Die Steuerung via Drucktaster bietet eine verzögerungsfreie Aktivierung, die an jedem Punkt des Verstellwegs gestoppt werden kann – und das schneller als bei jeder anderen Sattelstütze in diesem Test. Doch auch die Reverb AXS ist kein perfektes Produkt: Neben den stattlichen Anschaffungskosten geht auch die drahtlose Technologie mit einigen kleinen, aber nicht unerheblichen Nachteilen einher. Die große Stack-Höhe reduziert den Verstellbereich für Fahrer mit kurzen Beinen und als einzige Sattelstütze im Test bringt sie die Notwendigkeit mit sich, einen Akku laden zu müssen. Doch die gewaltigen Vorteile der RockShox AXS Reverb lassen sich nun mal auch nicht ignorieren, vor allem, wenn man die Stütze mit einer AXS-Schaltung kombiniert. Auch wenn wir mit Sicherheit nicht behaupten würden, dass man 800 € ausgeben muss, um eine gute höhenverstellbare Sattelstütze zu erhalten, so hat uns RockShox mit dieser tadellos funktionierenden Teleskopstütze endlich ins drahtlose Zeitalter befördert. Die RockShox Reverb AXS ist unser Testsieger und ein Blick in die Zukunft. RockShox Reverb AXS | 650 g | 150 mm (getestet) | 800 € inkl. AXS-Remote Was das Thema Performance angeht, spielt die neue RockShox Reverb AXS-Teleskopsattelstütze auf einem neuen Level. Ja, sie ist teuer, und ja, sie hat eine größere Stack-Höhe als die standardmäßige RockShox Reverb C1. Aber sie verfügt eben auch über die leichtgängigste Funktion sowie präziseste Steuerung aller Sattelstützen im Test – und was ihre Installation sowie Technik angeht, agiert sie auf einem neuen Niveau. Sie ist zwar nicht perfekt, doch wir sind zuversichtlich, dass drahtlose Technik in Zukunft der neue Standard für Teleskopsattelstützen sein wird – und daher sichert sie sich unseren Testsieg. StärkenPerformance auf einem neuen Levelkabellose InstallationSchwächenhoher StackAkku erfordert Aufladung Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur RockShox Reverb AXS-Sattelstütze Die beste günstige Teleskopsattelstütze – OneUp V2 Unter all den fantastischen Optionen gibt es eine Teleskopsattelstütze, die all unsere Anforderungen erfüllt hat und jedem Fahrer ein optimales Maß an Verstellweg mit der kompaktesten Abmessung bietet. Die einzigartige Aktivierung dieser Stütze benötigt minimales Spiel in der Außenhülle des Zuges, wodurch sie mit einigen Bikes (z. B. Santa Cruz Megatower) nur mit einem neuen Aktuator kompatibel ist. Dennoch funktioniert die OneUp V2-Teleskopsattelstütze für die meisten Bikes bestens, sieht fantastisch aus, hat die niedrigste Stack-Höhe und ist generell die kompakteste Teleskopstütze im Test. Außerdem ist sie erschwinglich, besitzt eine anpassbare Absenktiefe und hat sich in unserem Test zu 100 % als zuverlässig erwiesen – mehr als genug Argumente, um die OneUp V2 zu unserem Kauftipp zu machen. OneUp Dropper Post V2 | 594 g | 210 mm getestet | 209 € + 49,50 € für den OneUp-Remote-Hebel Dank der spezifischen Sattelklemmung sowie der niedrigen Stack-Höhe der OneUp Dropper Post V2 bekommt ihr euren Sattel so tief wie mit keiner anderen Sattelstütze. Die Möglichkeit, den Verstellweg um bis zu 20 mm zu verringern, ist genial, und auch der Remote-Hebel ist gut durchdacht und ein würdiges Upgrade für jede Teleskopsattelstütze mit Kabelzug. Die OneUp Dropper Post V2 ist wirklich beeindruckend und beschert einem den größtmöglichen Verstellweg, ohne dafür eine Bank überfallen zu müssen – unser klarer Kauftipp! Stärkenenormer Hub auf geringem Raumniedrigste Stack-HöheSchwächenAnsteuerung über Außenhülle nicht mit allen Bikes kompatibelgeringes laterales Spiel Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur OneUp Dropper Post V2-Sattelstütze Die Konkurrenten BikeYoke REVIVE BikeYoke REVIVE 185 | 583 g / 185 mm getestet | 434 € inkl. Triggy-Remote-Hebel Die BikeYoke REVIVE 185 ist wunderschön gefertigt und weist eine Menge cleverer technischer Features auf. Neben einer niedrigen Stack-Höhe verfügt sie über eine der leichtgängigsten Funktionen in diesem Test. Wenn ihr intelligente Ingenieurskunst schätzt und euch das gelegentliche Entlüften nicht stört, dann ist die BikeYoke REVIVE 185 wie für euch gemacht. Stärkenwunderschön gefertigtleichtgängiger Hubgroßartiger Remote-HebelSchwächenmuss öfter entlüftet werden als Teleskopstützen mit IFP-Kartuscheteuer Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur BikeYoke REVIVE 185-Sattelstütze FOX Transfer Factory FOX Transfer Factory | 583 g / 170 mm getestet | 429 € + 69 € für den FOX-Remote-Hebel Die FOX Transfer ist der Inbegriff einer Sorglos-Teleskopsattelstütze, denn an unserem Testexemplar gab es keinerlei Probleme hinsichtlich der Zuverlässigkeit. Obwohl die FOX Transfer im Jahr 2017 noch unseren Vergleichstest gewonnen hat und nach wie vor eine herrlich leichtgängige Bedienung bietet, können ihr einfach gefertigter Remote-Hebel und der hohe Stack nicht mehr mit den besten Modellen am Markt mithalten. Stärkensuper geschmeidigzuverlässigErreichen des maximalen Auszugs hörbarSchwächenRemote-Hebel einfach gefertigtfummelige Schrauben an der Sattelklemmung Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur FOX Transfer Factory-Sattelstütze KS LEV Si KS Lev Si | 589 g | 170 mm getestet | 260 € + 39 € für den Southpaw-Remote-Hebel Die KS LEV Si überzeugt mit einem fantastischen Preis, spitzenmäßiger Performance, niedriger Stack-Höhe und geringer Einstecktiefe. Sie ist eine großartige Wahl für alle, die nach ihrer ersten Teleskopsattelstütze suchen oder ihre zu kurze Stütze upgraden wollen. Einzig der etwas einfache Look enttäuscht ein wenig. StärkenSorglos-Teleskopsattelstützegeringe Stack-Höhe und EinstecktiefeSchwächenbesserer Remote-Hebel nur als Upgrade erhältlichfunktionell, aber wenig elegant Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur KS LEV Si-Sattelstütze PNW Bachelor PNW Components Bachelor | 590 g | 170 mm getestet | 255 € + 74 € für den Loam Lever-Remote-Hebel Die PNW Bachelor ist eine überragende Teleskopsattelstütze, die Zuverlässigkeit, stylishes Aussehen und eine perfekte Funktion bietet. Zusammen mit dem Loam Lever bildet sie ein spitzenmäßiges Team zu einem überragenden Preis. Wenn ihr nicht auf eine ultra niedrige Stack-Höhe angewiesen seid, dann ist die Bachelor die Teleskopsattelstütze, die wir euch empfehlen! StärkenLoam-Remote-Hebel ist der beste im Testtadellose PerformanceSchwächenStack-Höhe nicht die niedrigstekeine Markierung zur Sattelneigung am Kopf der Stütze Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur PNW Bachelor-Sattelstütze RockShox Reverb C1 RockShox Reverb C1 | 585 g | 175 mm getestet | 445 € inkl. 1x-Remote-Hebel Das Update auf die neue C1 befördert die RockShox Reverb zurück in die Spitzengruppe! Dank dem neuen, leichtgängigeren Mechanismus und einem Entlüftungsventil, mit dem man der Stütze neues Leben einhauchen kann, ist die RockShox Reverb C1 eine ausgezeichnete Wahl. Wenn die Zugverlegung in eurem Rahmen sehr beengt ist, dann ist der flexible Schlauch der Reverb ein Segen. Stärkenreibungslose Aktivierungflexibler Schlauch erleichtert kompliziertes Verlegen des Kabelsneues EntlüftungsventilSchwächenlanger Hebelweg am 1-fach-Remote-HebelEntlüften ist komplizierter als ein Zug-Wechsel Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur RockShox Reverb C1-Sattelstütze Yep Uptimizer HC 2.0 Yep Uptimizer 2.0 HC | 573 g | 185 mm getestet | 380 € inkl. Yep-Remote-Hebel Die Yep Uptimizer ist qualitativ hochwertig und die einzige Teleskopsattelstütze, die es euch erlaubt, etwas Farbe an euer Bike zu bringen. Der Joystick-Hebel hat unsere Tester nicht wirklich überzeugt, aber wenn ihr unter einem überladenen Lenker leidet, dann gibt dieser Hebel euch mehr Optionen als eine schalthebelartige Bedieneinheit. Stärkenhohe Verarbeitungsqualitätverschiedene FarboptionenSchwächenJoystick nicht ganz so überzeugend wie ein klassischer Remote-Hebelteuer Hier findet ihr den kompletten Test zur Yep Uptimizer-Sattelstütze Fazit Ein Beweis dafür, wie sehr sich der Markt der Teleskopstützen weiterentwickelt hat: Selbst nach vielen Monaten des Testens hatten wir kein wirkliches technisches Problem. Teleskopsattelstützen werden zunehmend verlässlicher und die Gesamtfunktion verbessert sich stetig. Es gab keine schlechten Sattelstützen in diesem Test, aber gewiss einige Highlights. Die Yep Uptimizer ist wunderschön gefertigt und ihr ungewöhnlicher Joystick-Hebel eignet sich bestens für alle, die noch einen Schalthebel für den Umwerfer besitzen, oder für E-Mountainbiker, die eine große Motor-Remote auf der linken Lenkerseite haben. Die FOX Transfer ist noch immer absolut zuverlässig, doch wir würden uns dafür entscheiden, den billig anmutenden Hebel zu ersetzen – entweder mit einem Modell von Wolf Tooth oder dem PNW Loam Lever für geschmeidigeren Betrieb (Hier findet ihr alle gängigen Hebel zum Nachrüsten). Die Entwicklung der neuen RockShox Reverb C1 war ein großer Schritt in der Evolution des kultigen Modells. Neu mit an Bord: eine kürzere Gesamtlänge, eine spürbar reibungslosere Funktion sowie ein neues Entlüftungsventil, um die Sattelstütze bei Bedarf innerhalb von Sekunden zu entlüften. Die Reverb hat sich nach wie vor ihren Kultstatus verdient und ist die beste Wahl für Leute mit sehr engen innenverlegten Leitungen. Die PNW Bachelor ist ebenfalls hervorragend, bombensicher und hat keinerlei Spiel. Den dazugehörigen – und absolut großartigen – Loam Lever-Bedienhebel empfehlen wir als Upgrade für jede Teleskopsattelstütze mit einer mechanischen Ansteuerung. FAQ Teleskopsattelstützen Euch stehen immer noch Fragezeichen auf der Stirn? In der folgenden FAQ haben wir alle wichtigen Fragen zum Thema versenkbare Sattelstützen beantwortet. Sind Teleskopsattelstützen ihr Geld wert? Heutzutage ist es nahezu unmöglich, ein Bike ohne Teleskopsattelstütze zu finden, selbst am preiswertesten Ende des Marktes. Die naheliegende Frage lautet daher: Sind höhenverstellbare Sattelstützen ihr Geld wert? Schließlich sind sie teurer und schwerer als konventionelle Sattelstützen! Die Antwort lautet klipp und klar: ja! Eine Teleskopstütze lässt euch mit nur einem Knopfdruck den Sattel absenken und räumt ihn damit im technischen Gelände oder auf steilen Abfahrten aus dem Weg. Einen Augenblick später befindet er sich schon wieder in der optimalen Höhe zum Pedalieren und das alles, ohne dass man die Hände vom Lenker nehmen musste. Durch diesen simplen Akt wird euer Bike sicherer und unendlich viel spaßiger. Wenn ihr keine Teleskopsattelstütze an eurem Bike habt, dann verpasst ihr was! Wie viel Verstellweg an der Sattelstütze ist am besten? Für gewöhnlich werden die meisten Bikes heutzutage standardmäßig mit Teleskopsattelstützen zwischen 100 und 170 mm ausgeliefert, abhängig von der Rahmengröße. Wir glauben, dass es bei den heutigen niedrigen Rahmen am besten ist, so viel Verstellweg wie möglich zur Verfügung zu haben. Ihr fahrt aktuell eine Teleskopstütze mit 120–150 mm und ein ordentliches Stück von ihr ragt aus dem Rahmen heraus? Dann würdet ihr wahrscheinlich von der erhöhten Sicherheit eines niedrigeren Sattels profitieren, den eine Teleskopstütze mit mehr Verstellweg ermöglicht. Habe ich Platz für eine längere Sattelstütze? Wenn ihr herausfinden wollt, wie viel Verstellweg für euch am besten ist, dann solltet ihr zunächst ermitteln, wie viel davon ihr zwischen eurem Sattel und eurem Rahmen unterbringen könnt. Dafür könnt ihr einfach schnell nachmessen: Wie weit ragt eure aktuelle Teleskopsattelstütze zwischen der Sattelklemme des Rahmens und der Unterseite des Klemmrings der Sattelstütze aus dem Rahmen heraus? Diese Zahl sagt aus, wie viel zusätzlichen Verstellweg ihr ungefähr hinzugewinnen könnt, WENN im Rahmeninneren genug Platz für eine längere Stütze vorhanden ist. Aber Achtung: Nicht alle Teleskopsattelstützen besitzen die gleiche Stack-Höhe, daher ist es am besten, kein Risiko einzugehen und darauf zu achten, sicherheitshalber ein paar Zentimeter Platz zu lassen. Woher weiß ich, ob eine neue Teleskopsattelstütze in meinen Rahmen passt? Wenn ihr euch nicht sicher seid, ob eine neue Teleskopstütze in euren Rahmen passt, dann schaut euch unser komplettes Feature zu diesem Thema an. Für eine schnelle Überprüfung müsst ihr zunächst ermitteln, wie tief sich eine Sattelstütze maximal in euren Rahmen hineinschieben lässt. Maximale Einstecktiefe Um die maximale Einstecktiefe zu ermitteln, die euer Rahmen bietet, nehmt eine lange, standardmäßige Sattelstütze und schiebt sie in euren Rahmen, so tief es geht. Oft stoppen ein Knick oder Drehpunkte des Fahrwerks im Sattelrohr die Sattelstütze bereits früher, als man denkt. Wenn die Sattelstütze anstößt, markiert sie auf Höhe der Sattelklemme des Rahmens mit Kreide, zieht sie wieder heraus und messt, wie weit die Stütze im Rahmen gesteckt hat. Maximale Fahrhöhe Nun solltet ihr noch in Erfahrung bringen, wie weit ihr die Sattelstütze herausziehen müsst, um entspannt pedalieren zu können. Stellt eure Sattelstütze auf eure normale Fahrhöhe ein und messt den Abstand zwischen der Sattelklemme des Rahmens und der Oberseite der Sattelstrebe. Damit ermittelt ihr die Länge der ausgezogenen Stütze, die ihr für bequemes Pedalieren benötigt. Um herauszufinden, ob eine neue Sattelstütze passen wird, addiert einfach die maximale Einstecktiefe mit der maximalen Fahrhöhe. Wenn die Gesamtlänge eurer neuen Sattelstütze kürzer als die vorgenannte Summe ist, dann sollte sie gut passen. Seid jedoch vorsichtig, wenn die neue Sattelstütze sehr nah an den gemessenen Wert herankommt, da ein wenig Platz am Fuß der Sattelstütze für das austretende Kabel benötigt wird. Was ist mit elektronischen Teleskopsattelstützen? Drahtlose Teleskopstützen sind nichts Neues, MAGURA hat bereits vor einigen Jahren die Vyron präsentiert. Das Problem war allerdings, dass sie nicht besonders gut war. Die Verzögerung von einer halben Sekunde bei der Kommunikation zwischen Hebel und Sattelstütze war eine frustrierende Erfahrung. Doch nun hat ein frischer Spieler das Feld betreten und das Spiel komplett verändert – RockShox hat die neue Reverb AXS veröffentlicht. Sie verwendet die neue, verschlüsselte sowie drahtlose AXS-Kommunikationstechnologie, dank der die Sattelstütze an jedem Punkt ihres Verstellbereichs mit verzögerungsfreier Präzision stoppt. Die RockShox Reverb AXS ist zwar aktuell noch sehr teuer, doch vielleicht könnte sie mit solch einer beeindruckenden Performance irgendwann sogar das Ende für Teleskopsattelstützen mit Kabeln bedeuten. Welche Teleskopsattelstütze ist die längste? Die Tage, an denen eine 150-mm-Teleskopsattelstütze als lang galt, sind gezählt. Mittlerweile gibt es turmhohe Sattelstützen, die bis zu 258 mm Verstellweg bieten und somit selbst Fahrer mit flamingoartigen Proportionen beglücken. Größeren Fahrern verschafft das eine komfortable Sitzposition und zudem ein erhöhtes Platzangebot, wenn die Sattelstütze voll eingefahren ist. Die aktuell längste Teleskopstütze erhält man mit dem EightPins NG2-System, das die besagten 258 mm Verstellweg bereitstellt. Allerdings benötigt man dafür ein spezielles Rahmendesign, das aktuell nur bei äußerst wenigen Bikes erhältlich ist. Die längsten „normalen“ Teleskopsattelstützen sind gegenwärtig die Vecnum NIVO mit 212 mm und die OneUp V2 mit 210 mm. Lässt sich die Höhe der Teleskopstütze einstellen? Die maximale Absenktiefe der meisten Teleskopsattelstützen lässt sich nicht einstellen, stattdessen kann man sie in verschiedenen Längen erwerben, beispielsweise 150, 170 oder 200 mm. Eine Ausnahme bildet die OneUp V2, die in den Längen 120, 150, 180 sowie 210 mm erhältlich ist, sich jedoch außerdem mithilfe der mitgelieferten 10- bzw. 20-mm-Spacer intern traveln lässt. Auch die Vecnum NIVO lässt sich leicht bis zu 32 mm Differenz einstellen. Damit hat man die größte Kontrolle über eine maßgeschneiderte Höhe der Sattelstütze. Sind die Hebel der Sattelstützen untereinander austauschbar? Ursprünglich wurden Teleskopsattelstützen als Gesamtsystem verkauft, inkl. Sattelstütze und Bedienhebel. Wenn ihr eine Sattelstütze besitzt, die per Kabelzug betätigt wird, gibt es auf dem Markt mittlerweile eine Vielzahl an Hebeln zum Nachrüsten, mit denen ihr das Gefühl eurer Sattelstütze upgraden könnt. Einige Teleskopstützen wie die von KS und Yep bieten zudem Hebel an, die auch mit 2-fach-Antrieben kompatibel sind. Doch da die meisten Fahrer heutzutage mit 1-fach-Antrieben unterwegs sind, stellt ein Trigger-Hebel auf der linken Seite des Lenkers die ergonomischste Lösung dar. BikeYoke, OneUp, PNW und Wolf Tooth bieten allesamt universelle Bedienhebel an, mit denen sich Sattelstützen mit minderwertigen Hebeln aufrüsten lassen, z. B. die FOX Transfer. Wenn ihr den Hebel eurer Teleskopstütze upgraden wollt, dann schaut euch unseren Vergleichstest zu Remotes für Teleskopsattelstützen an. Wie sollte ich meine Teleskopsattelstütze pflegen? Wenn ihr mechanische Probleme und kostspielige Wartungsarbeiten minimieren wollt, zahlt es sich aus, eure Teleskopstütze pfleglich zu behandeln. Denn sie ist nicht nur teuer, ständig am Arbeiten und befindet sich noch dazu direkt in der Schusslinie eures Hinterrades, das allerlei Schlamm, Steinchen und Wasser auf sie feuert – von ihr wird außerdem erwartet, dass sie all das schadlos übersteht. Mit ein wenig Pflege könnt ihr das Leben eurer Teleskopsattelstütze erheblich verlängern. Wir erklären euch, welche Wartungsmaßnahmen nach einer Runde mit eurem Bike unentbehrlich sind und beantworten hier einige der häufigsten Fragen über die Pflege höhenverstellbarer Sattelstützen. Sattelstütze/Hebel↩Die Gesamtlänge bezeichnet die Länge der Sattelstütze vom unteren Ende bis zur Mitte der Sattelbefestigung, wenn die Stütze komplett ausgefahren ist↩ Die Maximale Einstecktiefe ist die Mindestlänge, die gebraucht wird, damit die Stütze im eingefahrenen Zustand in den Rahmen passt↩ Die Fahrhöhe beschreibt die maximale Länge vom untersten Punkt des Klemmrings der Sattelstüze bis zur Mitte der Sattelbefestigung, wenn die Stütze komplett ausgefahren ist↩ Die Stack-Höhe beschreibt die minimale Länge vom obersten Punkt des Klemmrings der Sattelstüze bis zur Mitte der Sattelbefestigung, wenn die Stütze komplett eingefahren ist↩

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
6 - 19/11/2019 08:34:16

Ihr plant ein Upgrade eurer Teleskopsattelstütze, um mehr Verstellweg zu erhalten? Wir geben euch hier eine Anleitung: So könnt ihr auf Nummer sicher gehen, dass sie auch in euren Rahmen passt! Wenn ihr auf der Suche nach einer neuen Teleskopsattelstütze bzw. mehr Verstellweg seid, dann solltet ihr euch zuerst unseren Vergleichstest zum Thema „Die beste Mountainbike-Teleskopsattelstütze im Test“ ansehen und herausfinden, welche Stütze euren Anforderungen am ehesten genügt. Sich ein gutes Teleskopstützen-Modell herauszusuchen, ist noch der einfache Teil, aber die richtige Auswahl bezüglich des Verstellwegs zu treffen, kann sich als der schwierigere Part herausstellen. Wir glauben: Je mehr Verstellweg eine Teleskopstütze bietet, umso besser. Doch um einen teuren Fehlkauf zu vermeiden, müsst ihr euch zunächst vergewissern, dass in eurem Rahmen genug Platz für ein längeres Modell vorhanden ist. Wenn ihr selbst wie eine Giraffe gebaut seid und die Stütze weit herausgezogen habt, dann lässt sich eine Sattelstütze mit dem längsten Verstellweg in der Regel leicht unterbringen und perfekt auf eure Proportionen einstellen. Doch wenn eure Proportionen eher hobbitartig sind und ihr einen hohen Rahmen mit langem Sitzrohr habt, dann kann es Challenge sein, in einer bereits niedrig sitzenden Stütze noch 20 mm Verstellweg extra unterzubringen. Wir zeigen euch, wie ihr berechnen könnt, ob eine längere Stütze passen wird. Bevor ihr eine neue Teleskopstütze mit mehr Verstellweg einbaut, ist es äußerst wichtig zu prüfen, ob ihr genug Platz in eurem Rahmen habt googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Wie finde ich heraus, ob eine längere Teleskopstütze in meinen Rahmen passt? Wenn es darum geht, einen Upgrade eurer Sattelstütze vorzunehmen, geben sich die Hersteller von Teleskopsattelstützen alle Mühe, es uns leicht zu machen: Mit den detaillierten Größenangaben helfen sie, ein geeignetes Modell zu finden. Doch wie soll man herausbekommen, ob im eigenen Rahmen genug Platz ist, um die Stütze mit der gewünschten Höhe unterzubringen? Es wäre daher hilfreich, wenn Bike-Hersteller die maximale Einstecktiefe bei jeder Rahmengröße mit auflisten würden – leider ist das nicht der Fall. Daher müsst ihr selbst ein wenig Detektivarbeit leisten. Mit einigen wenigen simplen Messungen könnt ihr jedoch schnell feststellen, ob eine neue Teleskopstütze in euren Rahmen passt. Bevor ihr eine bestimmte Stütze in Betracht zieht und wir euch zeigen, wie ihr die nötigen Messungen vornehmt, müsst ihr euch zunächst zwei einfache Fragen stellen: Wie lautet der Innendurchmesser des Sattelrohrs meines Rahmens? Benötige ich eine Stütze mit interner oder externer Ansteuerung? Wie groß ist der Innendurchmesser von meinem Sattelrohr? Der erste Faktor bei der Auswahl einer neuen Teleskopstütze ist der Innendurchmesser des Sattelrohrs eures Bikes. Bei den meisten modernen Fullys beträgt dieser Innendurchmesser entweder 30,9, 31,6 oder 34,9 mm. Ältere Rahmen, Stahl-Fullys und Hardtails haben gelegentlich einen schmaleren Durchmesser von 27,2 mm. Die meisten Teleskopstützen sind erhältlich in den Größen 30,9 mm und 31,6 mm, doch auch 34,9 mm wird zunehmend beliebter. Wer einen Rahmen mit einem 27,2 mm-Sattelrohr-Innendurchmesser besitzt, hat weniger Optionen zur Verfügung, doch die wachsende Beliebtheit von Gravel-Bikes sowie absenkbaren Sattelstützen an XC-Bikes wird wahrscheinlich dafür sorgen, dass die Auswahl zukünftig größer wird. Es ist in jedem Fall äußerst wichtig, dass ihr eine Sattelstütze mit dem passenden Durchmesser für euren Rahmen auswählt. Ihr könnt zwar eine schmalere Stütze in einem breiteren Sattelrohr unterbringen, indem ihr eine Reduzierhülse, eine dünne Hülse aus Aluminium oder Plastik, nutzt. So lässt sich zum Beispiel eine 30,9-mm-Teleskopstütze in einem 31,6-mm-Rahmen unterbringen. Doch umgekehrt gibt es keinen Weg, eine breitere Stütze in einem zu schmalen Rahmen zu verwenden, beispielsweise eine 31,6-mm-Stütze in einem 30,9-mm-Rahmen. Um die beste Performance ohne nerviges Knarzen zu erhalten, würden wir euch stets empfehlen, eine Sattelstütze mit dem perfekt passenden Durchmesser und ohne Reduzierhülse zu verwenden. Der Innendurchmesser des Sattelrohrs eures Rahmens bestimmt, welchen Sattelstützendurchmesser ihr montieren müsst. Ihr könnt zwar Reduzierhülsen nutzen, um eine schmalere Sattelstütze in einem zu breiten Sattelrohr unterzubringen, doch es ist besser, eine Stütze mit der korrekten Größe zu verwenden. Brauche ich eine Teleskopstütze mit intern oder extern verlegtem Zug? In den frühen Tagen der höhenverstellbaren Sattelstützen verfügten alle Modelle über eine externe Zugverlegung, bei der das Kabel am Kopf oder Klemmring der Stütze befestigt wurde. Der Zug selbst wurde dabei der Einfachheit halber außen am Rahmen entlang geführt. Heutzutage besitzen die meisten modernen Bikes innenverlegte Leitungen (oft „stealth“ genannt), mit einer Öffnung im Rahmen, durch die ein Kabel innerhalb des Sattelrohrs bis hinauf zum unteren Ende der Teleskopstütze führt, wo es befestigt ist. Auch wenn es komplizierter ist, eine innenverlegte Leitung zu verlegen, ist das Kabel nach seiner Installation im Inneren des Rahmens geschützt und kann nicht knicken oder beschädigt werden. Da die höhenverstellbaren Sattelstützen mit innenverlegten Leitungen weitaus beliebter sind, nimmt die Auswahl an Stützen mit extern geführten Zügen stetig ab. Doch es gibt noch immer Optionen von FOX, Kind Shox, Thomson und einigen anderen Herstellern. Wie hoch ist der maximale Verstellweg einer Stütze, den ich in meinem Bike unterbringen kann? Um herauszufinden, welchen maximalen Verstellweg ihr mit eurer Sitzhöhe nutzen könnt, müsst ihr zunächst ein paar Messungen durchführen. Die erste Messung bezieht sich darauf, wie weit euer Sattel aus dem Rahmen herausragen sollte, damit ihr komfortabel pedalieren könnt. Wenn sich der Sattel auf eurer normalen, zum Pedalieren optimalen Sitzhöhe befindet, dann messt den Abstand zwischen dem obersten Punkt der Sattelklemme und der Mitte des Sattelgestells. Dieser Messwert ist eure Fahrhöhe. Ihr müsst außerdem die Stack-Höhe eurer Teleskopstütze kennen, also den minimalen Abstand, in welchem die Stütze in ihrer niedrigsten Position über euren Rahmen hinausragt (oder anders gesagt: die Höhe des Klemmrings sowie der Vorrichtung zur Sattelklemmung). Durch Unterschiede im Design der Sattelklemmung am Kopf der Stütze können Teleskopstützen hinsichtlich ihrer Stack-Höhe um über 30 mm variieren. Um eure Fahrhöhe zu ermitteln, bringt die Sattelstütze in eure normale Sitzhöhe beim Fahren und messt dann den Abstand von der Oberseite der Sattelklemme zur Mitte des Sattelgestells. Dieser Messwert ist eure Fahrhöhe. Bevor ihr eine höhenverstellbare Sattelstütze mit mehr Verstellweg montiert, müsst ihr sicherstellen, dass genug Platz für den von euch gewünschten Verstellweg vorhanden ist. Dafür wiederum müsst ihr den maximalen Teleskopstützen-Verstellweg herausfinden, der sich oberhalb eurer Sattelklemme unterbringen lässt, und zwar mithilfe der folgenden Formel: Fahrhöhe – Stack-Höhe der Teleskopstütze = maximal möglicher Verstellweg der Stütze Beispielsweise wollen wir – wie im obigen Foto gezeigt – eine längere Stütze als das 150-mm-Standardmodell einbauen. Wir stellen den Sattel daher auf die zum Pedalieren ideale Höhe ein und messen dann die Fahrhöhe aus, die hier 253 mm beträgt. Die Stack-Höhe der verbauten FOX Transfer-Teleskopstütze lautet 60 mm. Mit der oben genannten Formel lässt sich der theoretisch verfügbare Platz für einen Verstellweg von 253 mm berechnen: 253 mm – 60 mm = 193 mm. FOX bietet zwar keine Transfer-Teleskopsattelstützen mit 193-mm-Verstellweg an, doch ist in diesem Fall genug Raum vorhanden für ein Upgrade vom 150-mm-Modell zur 175-mm-Version. Allerdings nur, wenn auch genügend Einstecktiefe zur Verfügung steht, um die es im nächsten Abschnitt geht. ACHTUNG: Wenn ihr eine Teleskopstütze mit einem Verstellweg montiert, der identisch mit dem errechneten Maximum an Verstellweg oder zumindest sehr nah an diesen Wert kommt, dann könntet ihr Probleme bekommen, solltet ihr in der Zukunft den Sattel tauschen wollen. Denn Sattelhöhen variieren und ihr könntet daher eure Fahrhöhe überschreiten. Wie finde ich die maximale Einstecktiefe meines Rahmens heraus? Wir wissen nun also den maximalen Verstellweg, den wir unterbringen können. Doch um den Kreis zu schließen, müssen wir ebenso bestimmen, wie viel Platz in eurem Rahmen vorhanden ist. Auch wenn es logisch erscheinen mag, dass in einem Rahmen für Teleskopstützen jeglicher Länge genug Raum vorhanden sein sollte, können Knicke im Sattelrohr oder Drehpunkte des Fahrwerks oft die mögliche Einstecktiefe drastisch reduzieren. Das Canyon Spectral:ON hat, wie viele andere Bikes auch, einen Knick im Sattelrohr, der die maximal mögliche Einstecktiefe mit einer neuen Teleskopstütze stark reduziert Der präziseste Weg, um die maximale Einstecktiefe eures Rahmens herauszufinden, ist, eine lange standardmäßige Sattelstütze in euren Rahmen zu stecken (ihr könnt euch ein Modell von einem Shop oder Freunden leihen). Steckt die Sattelstütze so weit wie möglich in den Rahmen hinein und markiert die Stütze auf Höhe der Sattelklemme mit Kreide. Messt dann an der Stütze ab, wie tief sie im Rahmen steckte und schon habt ihr die maximale Einstecktiefe. Wenn ihr keine klassische Sattelstütze zur Hand habt, könnt ihr auch mit einer Taschenlampe in das Sattelrohr hineinleuchten und ein Maßband nutzen, indem ihr den Weg hinunter bis zum ersten Hindernis messt, das ihr seht. Doch natürlich ist dieser Weg prinzipiell nicht so genau wie die erstgenannte Methode. Um die maximal mögliche Einstecktiefe eures Rahmens herauszufinden, steckt am besten eine lange standardmäßige Sattelstütze in das Sattelrohr, bis sie auf das erste Hindernis trifft und sich nicht tiefer einschieben lässt Markiert dann die Einstecktiefe des Sattelrohrs mit Kreide und zieht die Stütze wieder heraus. Der Abstand vom Fuß der Stütze bis zur von euch gesetzten Markierung ist die maximale Einstecktiefe. Wenn ihr keine lange, klassische Sattelstütze zur Hand habt, könnt ihr auch mit einem Maßband im Inneren des Sattelrohrs die Distanz bis zum ersten Hindernis messen. Allerdings ist diese Methode nicht so genau. Wir haben uns dazu das Canyon Spectral:ON vorgenommen, das ein besonders kurzes Sattelrohr hat) und eine 31,6 mm-Sattelstütze bis zu einer maximalen Tiefe von 255 mm einstecken können. Die maximale Einstecktiefe für unseren Medium-Rahmen beträgt also 255 mm. Im zuvor genannten Beispiel mit der FOX Transfer 175-mm-Teleskopstütze haben wir eine maximale Einstecktiefe von 298,5 mm ermittelt, inklusive der Auslöseeinheit (laut Website des Herstellers). Damit ist sie 43,5 mm länger als der vorhandene Platz im Inneren des Rahmens (255 mm) und folglich ragen 43,5 mm der Sattelstütze über der Sattelklemme heraus. Eine Warnung hinsichtlich der Auslöseeinheiten: In vielen Fällen geben die Hersteller von Teleskopstützen die Abmessungen der Auslöseeinheiten am unteren Ende der Stützen bei der Angabe der „maximalen Einstecktiefe“ nicht mit an. Prüft alle Parameter vor einer Bestellung also besser zweimal. Von unseren vorherigen Berechnungen wissen wir, dass sich im Falle unseres Beispiel-Fahrers für ein korrektes Pedalieren maximal 253 mm an Sattelstütze zwischen der Sattelklemme und dem Sattelgestell befinden dürfen – wir haben diesen Abstand als Fahrhöhe definiert. Jetzt, da wir alle notwendigen Messwerte kennen, können wir eine klare Antwort darauf erhalten, ob unsere Sattelstütze passen wird. Wir addieren also Folgendes dazu: Länge des Verstellwegs der neuen Stütze + Stack-Höhe des neuen Modells + Höhe des freiliegenden Teils der Teleskopsattelstütze, wenn sie bis zum Anschlag in das Sattelrohr eingeschoben ist. Somit erhalten wir: 175 + 60 + 43 = 278 mm Wenn wir die FOX Transfer-Sattelstütze mit 175 mm so tief wie möglich in den Rahmen hineinschieben, ragt die Stütze also 278 mm über die Sattelklemme hinaus, was höher ist als unsere maximale Fahrhöhe von 253 mm. Die 175 mm-Stütze ist also zu lang für unseren Rahmen sowie Fahrer und wir werden uns mit 150 mm Verstellweg begnügen müssen. In dieser Konstellation ist die geringe maximale Einstecktiefe des Canyon Spectral:ON der limitierende Faktor. Wenn euer Rahmen nur über eine sehr kleine maximale Einstecktiefe verfügt, ihr aber mehr Verstellweg wollt, dann schaut euch am besten die neusten Teleskopsattelstützen mit minimalen Einstecktiefen an, wie etwa die RockShox Reverb AXS oder One-Up V2. Fazit Es kann etwas knifflig sein, herauszufinden, ob eine neue Teleskopstütze in euren Rahmen passt – vor allem wenn ihr euch mehr Verstellweg wünscht. Denn ihr müsst nicht nur berücksichtigen, wie weit die Sattelstütze bei vollem Auszug aus eurem Rahmen herausragt, sondern auch, ob genug Platz für die Stütze in eurem Rahmen vorhanden ist. Doch mit ein paar sorgfältigen Messungen könnt ihr euch vor Anschaffung einer neuen höhenverstellbaren Sattelstütze Gewissheit verschaffen. Wenn ihr jedoch noch immer Zweifel habt, dann schaut am besten bei euren lokalen Bike-Händler vorbei – er kann euch sicher helfen. Den Verstellweg eurer höhenverstellbaren Sattelstütze zu erhöhen, kann sich als kleine Challenge erweisen, doch mit einigen sorgfältigen Messungen könnt ihr eine fundierte Entscheidung treffen

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
8 - 14/11/2019 17:51:15

BMC has issued a voluntary recall for all Teammachine SLR01 Disc bikes from model years 2018 and 2019, which first went on sale in June 2017. BMC says it has identified a problem with the fork found on twenty models, which could result in a damaged steerer tube, and therefore potentially lead to crashes and injuries. In light of this, BMC is requesting that owners of affected models stop riding them immediately and take their bike to a BMC retailer for a ‘safety check’. The safety check will reportedly involve the retailer carrying out an identification process to determine whether the bike is cleared to ride, or if the fork needs to be exchanged for a new one. Bikes produced in the model year 2020, Teammachine SLR02 bikes and SLR01 rim brake models are excluded from the recall. The full text of the recall is below, including a list all of all affected models. For Immediate Release  Grenchen, Switzerland, 14th November 2019 – BMC Switzerland is issuing a recall for all Teammachine SLR01 Disc bikes from the Model Years 2018 and 2019 for safety checks. These models first went on sale in June 2017. BMC Switzerland has identified a technical problem with the fork that could result in a cracked or broken steerer tube, leading to potential crashes and injuries. To safeguard the user and uphold the brand’s own strict quality standards, BMC Switzerland requests that these bikes are no longer ridden and are brought to a BMC retailer for a safety check. The retailer will carry out an identification process to determine whether the bike is cleared to ride, or whether the fork needs to be exchanged.  The following models are included in the recall action:  Model Year 2019 Teammachine SLR 01 DISC EDITION AXS – Stealth Teammachine SLR 01 DISC ONE – Race Grey Teammachine SLR 01 DISC TWO – Steel Blue Teammachine SLR 01 DISC THREE – Team Red Teammachine SLR 01 DISC FOUR – Carbon Red Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Race Grey Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Steel Blue Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Team Red Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Aqua Green Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Stealth Model Year 2018 Teammachine SLR 01 DISC TEAM – Team Red Teammachine SLR 01 DISC ONE – Carbon Grey Teammachine SLR 01 DISC TWO – Grey Blue Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Team Red Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Carbon Green Teammachine SLR 01 DISC MODULE – Carbon Grey Bikes produced in Model Year 2020 are not included in the precautionary product recall. Teammachine SLR02 bikes and SLR01 models with rim brakes are also excluded from the recall.

Posted by
Bike Radar
6 - 13/11/2019 07:51:22

The DownRock is a brand new, bird-flippin’, trail-rippin’ hardtail that has just been launched by the crew from Curve Cycling. Joining the Melbourne brand’s existing off-road lineup that includes the UpRock, GXR and GMX, the DownRock is pitched as being the most capable and the most naughty of the lot. We’ve just received a complete Curve DownRock for a full shakedown and review, but before we get it dead-filthy like, let’s take a closer look at this lovely mountain bike to see what makes it special. Aussie brand Curve Cycling is ready to unleash its new hardtail pinner; the DownRock. Ooh Shiny! That’s because it’s titanium mate! Ti-3Al-2.5V to be exact, and from first inspection, it appears to have been masterfully welded together with some extremely neat joins on display for all to see. Why titanium? Because it offers a unique blend of strength, weight and durability, and when it’s all put together, offers a zingier ride quality than alloy, while being lighter than steel. Plus, just look at it! That ain’t no painted frame… Nice short back end on our Medium test bike. That’s A Big BB Shell – What’s Inside? Up front, the DownRock gets a shapely tapered head tube to house a clean zero-stack headset. At the opposite end, cowled dropouts are locked down with a simple 148x12mm alloy thru-axle. Partway between the two, you’ll find a huge T47 threaded bottom bracket shell – a relatively new frame standard that aims to offer the ability to fit pretty much any crank axle size, without being forced to use really tiny ball bearings. This is particularly important for cranks with a 30mm axle, which take up most of the space inside a traditional threaded BB shell, leaving very little room for the bearings themselves. T47 (named after its 47mm internal diameter) allows for larger BB cups that thread into the frame, rather than press-in like PF92 and PF30 bottom bracket systems. Structurally, it offers more surface area for the downtube, seat tube and chainstays to weld to, which creates a stiffer and stronger junction in a part of the frame that experiences high loads. Up until now, T47 has mostly found favour with smaller frame builders, though with Trek recently adopting the standard for its new Crockett cyclocross bike, there’s a good chance we’ll be seeing it on more bikes, from more brands, in the future. It’s a threaded bottom bracket shell, but a bit bigger than normal. The T47 bottom bracket shell offers a big platform to join all those tubes together, and it also allows for a variety of different crank sizes to be used. The Big Fork, Fat Rubber & Long Dropper Club Being a hardtail that’s designed to seek out the good times, the DownRock is ready to accept 130-150mm travel fork. However, Curve specs both the frameset and the complete bikes with a 130mm travel RockShox Pike Ultimate fork. With that fork, you’re looking at a 65° head angle and a very healthy BB drop of 62-66mm, depending on the frame size. Along with the generous reach measurements, the DownRock puts a big fat tick in the long, low and slack boxes. Helping to take the sting out of the trail further, the DownRock is rolling on 29in wheels all the way from the Small through to the XL size. There’s clearance for up to a 2.6in tyre in the back, though our test bike has an e*thirteen rubber combo with a 2.4in All-Terrain up front and a 2.35in Semi-Slick out back. While the DownRock has been tested with a 150mm travel fork, Curve has optimised the geometry around a 130mm fork. High volume e*thirteen rubber front and rear, with a semi-slick out back. Along with modern geometry and high-volume rubber, dropper posts have been an absolute boon for the humble hardtail. With your arms and legs playing a bigger role in impact-absorption duties, being able to crush the saddle out of the way offers a tonne more room for moving around the cockpit while bending your limbs in preparation for the next huck-to-flat. To make the most of the latest crop of big travel dropper posts, the DownRock employs a short seat tube – our Medium test bike has a 410mm seat tube, and comes spec’d with a 170mm dropper. Larger frames get a whopping 200mm travel party post! This thing looks fun standing still! Size-Specific Seat Angle & Chainstays As you’ll see below, there’s been some serious attention to the geometry on the DownRock. After all, it’s one of the most important aspects of any mountain bike, and even more so on a hardtail. To begin with, there are five frame sizes, rather than the usual four. The ‘Extra Medium’ (love that name!) slots in between the Medium and Large frame sizes, and offers up more choice for riders who have a particular reach measurement in mind. Another aspect that Curve was eager to address is the rear centre measurement, which has been scaled proportionally for each frame size. So as the front centre (reach) gets bigger, so too does the rear centre (chainstay length). The idea is to maintain weight distribution as much as possible between frame sizes, while keeping the back end compact for responsive handling through the turns. At least, that’s the theory anyway. Short seat tubes allow for long dropper posts. With the saddle slammed, it’s got a total BMX vibe about it. Stubby 35mm long stem mates to a nice long top tube. Likewise, the seat tube angle is quite different between each of the five frame sizes. And indeed on the smaller frames the seat tube has more of a bend to it, whereas it’s completely straight on the XL frame size. This is all about producing a similar effective seat tube angle (a rather steep 75.75°) when measured from the stack line. It’s no doubt a more expensive way of producing a frame, because you need different tubing for the rear of the bike for all five sizes. But it’s cool to see Curve make that commitment to maintaining consistent sizing and rider fit throughout the range. This is something we’ve seen Norco do with its latest Sight and Optic models, and we’d like to see more brands share that same commitment. Curve DownRock frame geometry. Note the ‘Extra Medium’ size. Nice! Curve DownRock Frameset Features Ti-3Al-2.5V Titanium tubing Tapered Zero Stack headtube Designed to accommodate 130-150mm travel forks 65° head angle 75.75° effective seat tube angle Reach: 422mm (SM), 444mm (MD), 459mm (XM), 474mm (LG), 496mm (XL) Chainstay length: 420-445mm (size dependent) T47 bottom bracket shell Boost 148x12mm thru-axle dropouts Max tyre clearance: 29×2.6in Max chainring clearance: 32T (SM), 34T (MD-XL) Two bottle cage mounts Claimed weight: 2000g (XL size) A lovely tapered head tube hides a zero-stack headset. Room for up to 2.6in tyres back there. A post-mount disc brake and a bolt-up 148x12mm thru-axle keep the back end slim and tidy. Choose Your Own Hardtail Adventure Curve offers the option to buy the DownRock as a standalone frame that comes with a headset, seat collar and thru-axle for $3,299. There’s also a frameset package for $4,499, which adds in a RockShox Pike Ultimate RC2 fork and a Reverb Stealth dropper post. Or you can go for a complete bike, like the one we have here, which sells for $8,999. Here’s a closer look at the spec on the complete bike; Frame | Ti-3Al-2.5V Titanium, 0mm Travel Fork | RockShox Pike Ultimate RC2, Charger 2 Damper, 42mm Offset, 130mm Travel Wheels | DT Swiss 350 Hubs & Curve Dirt Hoops Wider 40 Carbon Rims, 30mm Inner Rim Width Tyres | e*thirteen All-Terrain TRSr MoPo 29×2.4in Front & Semi-Slick TRSr 29×2.35in Rear Drivetrain | SRAM GX Eagle 1×12 w/GX Eagle 32T Cranks & 10-50T Cassette Brakes | SRAM G2 RSC 4-piston, 180mm Rotors Bar | Joystick 8-BIT LT Alloy, 28mm Rise, 800mm Width Stem | Joystick Binary, 31.8mm Diameter, 35mm Length Seatpost | RockShox Reverb Stealth Dropper Post, 170-200mm Travel Saddle | WTB Silverado Pro RRP | $8,999 All cables and hydro lines run externally under the downtube with bolt-on guides keeping them in check. Is a modern hardtail like this enough to bring you over from your full suspension bike? So what do you folks think of the new Curve DownRock? Is this a hardtail you’d like to party on? Let us know your thoughts, and any questions you might have for us, in the comments below! We’ll be hitting the local test loops on the DownRock shortly, so get set for a full review coming soon. If you need more info in the meantime, head to the Curve Cycling website. And if you’re frothing on all this hot hardtail talk, be sure to check out our stories on the new 2020 Norco Torrent, and our recent feature on the custom steel hardtails from Tor Bikes in Beechworth. Mo’ Flow Please! Enjoyed that article? Then there’s plenty more to check out on Flow Mountain Bike, including all our latest news stories and product reviews. And if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel, and sign up to our Facebook page and Instagram feed so you can keep up to date with all things Flow! The post On Test | The Curve DownRock Is A Titanium Hardtail Built To Party 🤙 appeared first on Flow Mountain Bike.

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
2 - 08/11/2019 16:34:14

Do you blast down trails but also go on self-supported bikepacking trips? How can you combine two types of riding that seemingly oppose each other and do both without one side outweighing the other? My Nordest Britango build is an attempt to do just that, plus of course a bit of gratuitous bling and some interesting details. Here you’ll find an overview of the editor’s dream bikes. Andy’s Nordest Britango Ti googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Anyone who’s into bikepacking eventually comes to the point where they want to take their jumble of proven components spread across their personal bike(packing) fleet and combine them into a complete and coherent dream bike. After riding through the countryside on everything from fat bikes, monster crossers and gravel bikes, it was time for me to build a fully trail-ready hardtail. One that could carry all my gear across long distances and demanding alpine routes but also serve as a fun trail machine when unloaded. My requirements: Titanium frame with enough space for a reasonably sized frame bag Long-distance geometry that’s still fun on the trails Low maintenance componentry without performance sacrifices No carbon fibre 130 mm fork After a lot of research and the sobering realisation that the market for production titanium frames with modern but not exaggerated geometry is extremely niche, I came across the Nordest Britango. The bike wasn’t in production at the time, but one look at the geometry table confirmed that this had to be the right frame. Luckily, I was able to get my hands on a pre-production model. The Nordest Britango Ti My key criteria were a frame with 29″ wheels, around 460 mm reach, a reasonably slack head angle, relatively steep seat tube angle, a spacious front triangle and compatibility with a 130 mm travel fork. The Nordest Britango ticks all of these boxes. Not only that but it features short chainstays for crisp handling, plenty of mounting points for bottle cages and the option to fit plus-sized 27.5″ tires. And at € 1,399 the Britango is quite affordable for a titanium frame. Nordest now also offer their customers the choice of a 27.2 mm seat tube for regular seat posts or a 31.6 mm seat tube with stealth dropper post routing. As a prototype model, my frame has the former, but this doesn’t mean I had to make do without a dropper post. The Dominion’s brake lever probably has the lightest action on the market. This keeps your hands and forearms fresher for longer on the descents. The Cane Creek Helm coil fork offers plush performance at all times. Bonus: thanks to the coil shock, there is no need to take along a shock pump on bikepacking trips. With the 130 mm travel Cane Creek Helm coil fork, the head angle of the Britango sits at 66.5° Legendary for their durability and always my first choice for flat pedals: Hope F20s. I chose the less aggressive Solid Pins… made from titanium, for that little bit of extra bling :) Not a common sight: the 11-speed SRAM GX rear derailleur has been converted to 12-speed with the help of E*thirteen’s TRS Plus upgrade kit. The whole system is lighter, offers more ground clearance and a bigger gear range than SRAM’s Eagle drivetrains. Stiff and just light as carbon: the titanium Cane Creek eeWings crankset. The oval Wolf Tooth chainring is easy on the knees on long climbs and thanks to the compact cassette, a 28 t chainring can be fitted which offers a little more ground clearance. The PNW Pine dropper post offers only 110 mm travel but with the saddlebag attached you wouldn’t be able to drop the saddle further anyway The seat tube is available either with a diameter of 27.2 mm as shown here or 31.6 mm for stealth dropper posts. At just under 74°, the seat tube angle is pleasantly steep. The ultra-compact rear end offers space for a 29×2.5″ or 27.5×2.8″ tire, despite the 420 mm chainstays The build A central idea behind this bike was not to use carbon fibre. Robustness was not the decisive factor here, but rather the reduced ecological impact. Although titanium, aluminium and steel aren’t much less resource-intensive to produce, they are, in stark contrast to carbon composites, economically recyclable at the end of their life. Titanium is also very resistant to corrosion and fatigue, giving it a very long lifespan and the longer you’re able to use something, the more ecological it becomes. Besides, it was a welcome challenge – for example, a SRAM X01 Eagle groupset wouldn’t have been an option. Frame Nordest Britango Ti, Size ML Fork Cane Creek Helm Coil 29, auf 30 mm Brakes Hayes Dominion A4 200/180 mm Drivetrain SRAM GX, E*thirteen 12 Speed Upgrade-Kit, Wolf Tooth 28t-Chainring, Cane Creek eeWings cranks, SRAM XX1 Eagle chain Seatpost PNW Pine 27.2 mit Loam Lever 110 mm Saddle/Grips Ergon SM Pro Men, Ergon GA3 Stem Renthal Duo 50 mm Handlebar Thomson Ti Riser Bar, 800 mm Wheels Stan’s NoTubes Sentry Mk3, silberne Decals Tires MAXXIS Minion DHF 2.6 MaxxTerra EXO / MAXXIS Aggressor 2.5WT EXO Accessories/Bags Wolf Tooth Components, Jagwire, Bedrock Bags The drivetrain – compact, lightweight and 511% gear range While a Rohloff or a Pinion drivetrain are ideal for bikepacking, they make less sense on a dual-purpose build since you won’t be taking the bike on super long expeditions and it would suffer from the extra weight for trail riding. With the help of E*Thirteen’s TRS Plus 12-speed upgrade kit, I was able to update the 11-speed SRAM drivetrain. The kit comes with a two-piece 9-46 t cassette made of steel and aluminium as well as various small parts to convert the shifter and derailleur to a 12-speed system. This has several advantages: the cassette offers a slightly bigger gear range, weighs less and allows the use of smaller chainrings. Together with the shorter non-Eagle derailleur, you get a very compact drivetrain with better ground clearance. An oval Wolf Tooth Components chainring takes the pressure off your knees on long rides and is mounted to the best-suited crankset for this project – a titanium Cane Creek eeWings. Although outrageously expensive, they’re sexy as hell and weigh the same as SRAM’s X01 Eagle carbon model. Fork, brakes and wheels The Helm Coil 29 fork is made by Cane Creek as well. I intentionally chose the coil version so that I don’t need to carry a shock pump and if anything malfunctions I should be able to carry on riding. It’s also very easy to adjust its travel and so gives me all the options I was looking for. The Hayes Dominion A4 brakes were also an easy choice to make. The super-light lever action, reliable performance and small technical details such as the adjustment screws for the callipers immediately convinced me – I simply had to have them. For the wheelset, I quickly honed in on a set of Stan’s NoTubes Sentry Mk3. The wheels offer a good mix of reliability, a wide 32 mm rim width and reasonable weight. With 32 spokes front and rear, if I happen to break a spoke it means the wheel won’t immediately collapse under the weight of my bags. The tire choice was just as straightforward. In principle, I wanted tires as wide as the frame and fork would allow, with minimal rolling resistance and good durability, as well as a reasonable amount of grip. Up front I went for a 2.6″ MAXXIS Minion DHF II in the MaxxTerra compound for the best grip and acceptable rolling resistance. I paired it with a 2.5″ Aggressor in DualCompound on the rear for low rolling resistance and increased durability while still offering a rugged and versatile tread pattern. Since bikepacking isn’t quite as demanding and both my riding style and body weight are rather light, the standard EXO casing does the job for both tires. Cockpit, contact points and dropper post The 800 mm wide Thomson Ti Riser handlebar certainly steals the show. Admittedly just as unreasonable as the titanium cranks when considering the astronomical price, the handlebar skilfully combines damping and rigidity. The Renthal Duo stem was mainly an aesthetic choice but it has the advantage that there are no screws at the bottom of the clamp to rub against the handlebar bag. I didn’t have to think long choosing the Ergon saddle and grips. The GA3 grips offer a winning combination of long-distance comfort and control, and the SM Pro Men keeps its marketing promise, making it pretty much the most comfortable saddle I’ve ever ridden on. Normally I would have gone for a purely mechanical dropper post, such as E*Thirteen’s TRS+. However, since the prototype Britango was only available with a 27.2 mm seat tube and no stealth routing, I chose the PNW Pine. Together with the Loam Lever, it’s the smoothest option in the tiny market of skinny dropper posts. The short 110 mm travel has the advantage that you don’t have to fit a limiter to protect the saddlebag – with the dropper completely lowered, the saddle pack still has enough tire clearance. The cable is routed externally, so swapping it our for a rigid seat post is super easy if I ever feel the need to attach luggage with more volume. Since I received my prototype Nordest have made the production frame available with a 31.6 mm seat tube for those who prefer stealth dropper routing. My first choice for the bottom bracket, headset and pedals are components from Hope. They look good, are super robust and durable, easy to service and have never let me down – reason enough to use them here as well. Speaking of pedals, my third unreasonable upgrade was the titanium pins on the F20 pedals … Luggage, accessories and opticsk The variety of bikepacking bags is huge. Most, however, are designed for maximum capacity and pure touring. Since my bike had to be trail-capable even when fully loaded, I eventually settled for Bedrock Bags from Colorado. The Black Dragon Dropper Seat Bag has a clever attachment system that effectively stops the bag from swinging around. Classic handlebar bags need a rather long stem to work well – not so with the Moab Handlebar Bag. Specifically designed for modern MTB cockpits, it bends around the head tube, positioning itself centrally under the handlebar even with a short stem, thereby making room for the brake levers and also shifting the centre of gravity more towards the middle of the bike. The frame bag is custom made and securely attaches to the frame via the bottle cage bosses for a clean look. Since the bags don’t have the biggest carrying capacity, I added various smaller bags from Bedrock Bags’ range. The handlebar bag bends around the head tube. The weight of the bag’s content is shifted further back and the bag doesn’t interfere with the brake levers despite the short 50 mm stem. The rails of the Wolf Tooth B-RAD system are ideal for attaching bottle cages to a suspension fork. In trail mode, the bottle cages can simply be unscrewed. All bags are handmade by Bedrock Bags in Durango, Colorado. The frame bag is made to measure and bolted to the seat and down tube via the frame’s bottle cage bosses. The stiffening plate from which the saddlebag hangs is firmly attached to the saddle rails. Together with the sophisticated fastening system, this results in a pretty much swing-free construction. ou’ve got to have a little bit of bling. All the cable housings and hoses were replaced with silver ones from Jagwire. The Jagwire connectors accent the gold of the Cane Creek fork and the SRAM XX1 Eagle chain, visually completing the package. Since the space in the front triangle is taken up by the frame bag, you’ll undoubtedly be asking yourself where the water bottles are supposed to go. There’s space for one on the underside of the down tube, but that isn’t enough for long distances. The Wolf Tooth B-RAD expansion system is designed to be used in combination with standard bottle cage bosses, but it also works great for attaching bottle cages to your fork. When not in use, you can remove the bottle cages and leave the rails in place. The beautiful stainless steel bottle cages are made for Wolf Tooth by King Cage. Bringing everything together visually, I swapped out the stock cables (brakes, gear, dropper) and connectors to Ice Gray and Gold Jagwire models. I also replaced the white stickers of the Stan’s NoTubes Sentry Mk3 wheels with silver ones. Coming in at 12.64 kg (without bags) the bike is no lightweight. I could easily have shaved off 600 g just by going with an air fork and a carbon handlebar, but robustness and peace of mind were significantly more important to me than weight savings. Onboard – how does the Nordest Britango Ti ride? The riding position on the Nordest Britango Ti is fantastic. Thanks to the 637 mm top tube and the 74° seat tube in size M/L, the riding position is nice and central, allowing you to keep cranking even after several hours on the super comfortable Ergon SM Pro Men saddle. The only drawback: the 420 mm chainstays are extremely short for a 29er and I would have liked them to be 5 mm longer for more directional stability and tire clearance. With the 130 mm fork, the front end remains in control up steep climbs and you could happily go up to 140 mm when loaded. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Since the additional weight in full-on bikepacking mode only comes to about 10 kg, you can leave the standard coil (72-90 kg) in the fork. However, the preload has to be increased by about six clicks and the high- and low-speed compression damping by two clicks. The rebound setting can remain as is – the front-heavy load compensates for the increased preload. The front triangle is not the most torsionally stiff due to the slim titanium tubes and the short head tube. Fully loaded for unsupported expeditions (tent, sleeping bag, clothes, cooker, tools, 2.25 litres of water and food for 2 days) the Nordest weighs a whopping 23 kg and that flex is more noticeable. That’s to be expected and acceptable given that you won’t be riding as hard with the bags attached anyway and the frame wasn’t designed for with this in mind. Nitpicking, I feel that increasing the diameter (and stiffness) of the down and top tubes by a few millimetres wouldn’t be unwarranted. Unloaded, the effect is significantly less pronounced and barely noticeable. The downhill handling is easy and playful, and in combination with the 800 mm wide handlebar, it gives you a feeling of control and confidence. This is not a bike to be underestimated when you head off the beaten track. It handles narrow, technical alpine trails just as confidently as steep, rough, full-speed descents. The plush Helm coil fork reliably keeps the bike on track and together with the super-light lever action of the powerful Hayes Dominion A4 brakes, your hands don’t cramp up on long descents. It’s perhaps unnecesarry to say given my careful selection, but all the components delivered in terms of performance and comfort. There isn’t a single component that I would change. The Nordest comes into its own when riding unloaded on flowing, narrow forest trails. Here it’s able to play to the strengths of its short and stiff rear end, weaving nimbly between the trees. Conclusion Game, set and match. The Nordest Britango masters the balancing act between fun trail hardtail and bikepacking machine and the carefully selected components effectively toe the line between the two for this dual-purpose machine. The bike is super comfortable riding long distances and great fun on flow trails. Although the componentry, geometry and the handling tick all the boxes I was looking for, there are two things I’d like to see improved on the frame. With slightly longer chainstays for a little more directional stability and composure, along with larger diameter tubing for more torsional stiffness when loaded, it would be my dream of an all-round bike come true. Topsperfect all-round geometrygreat ride comforteasy and agile handlingtrail-capable Bedrock Bags systemno carbon fibre partsFlopsextremely short chainstaysflex when fully loaded For more info head to nordestcycles.com. The other Editors’ Choice-Bikes can be found here. This article is from ENDURO issue #040ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free!

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
4 - 30/10/2019 16:17:14

Norco’s Sight 2020 all-mountain bike, the company says, has perfect weight distribution for maximum front and rear wheel grip in all scenarios (climbs, descents, low and high speeds). The brand’s mission was “to build a new Sight with immense descending capability, adept, surefooted climbing and efficient, powerful pedalling”, and its method was through in-depth scientific research in order to unearth “formulas that precisely determine how riders of every build fit on bikes, and how each unique fit affects handling”. The most anticipated enduro bikes of 2020 How to choose the right mountain bike (guide) The result is a great-looking new Sight range with a total of seven carbon and aluminium models in four frame sizes and two wheel sizes (one youth model is also being launched). Despite the extensive range of bikes, Norco seems most proud of its new Ride Aligned system. This, according to the brand, is the outcome of its research and testing, with an ethos of matching “each individual bike to the human who rides it”. 160mm front, 150mm rear suspension travel 27.5in or 29in wheels Carbon or aluminium frame Four sizes Ride Aligned geometry and setup assist Fits full size water bottle This doesn’t mean custom geometry — as mentioned above, there are four frame sizes to choose from — but rather a setup aid via Norco’s proprietary app, and of course some well-thought-through geometry numbers. Its aim is to position the “rider’s centre of gravity – both seated and standing – at an optimum position for ideal weight distribution between the wheels for maximum grip and control” in order to achieve “consistent weight distribution at the [tyres’] contact patch across the entire size range”. How does it do this? By taking into account a rider’s build, their riding style and the sort of trails they expect to ride, Norco’s Ride Aligned Bike Setup Guide (app) provides recommended suspension and tyre pressures and suspension settings. Perhaps nothing too revolutionary — settings guides are provided with most products — but, if Norco’s press release is to be believed, the brand has really gone to great lengths to ensure the bike and rider work as one system, as designed by the company’s engineers and thinkers. The bike’s geometry numbers are modern without being extreme: 485mm reach, 440mm rear-centre, 1,262mm wheelbase, 25mm bottom bracket drop on a size large 29in-wheeled Sight Carbon. Likewise, its 64-degree head angle and 77.7-degree effective seat tube angle are on the money without pushing any boundaries — it’s sensibly up-to-date. As with the recently launched Optic short-travel bike, the Sight’s rear-centre length increases by increments of 5mm through the sizes, something many manufacturers still don’t bother with, but a sign of Norco’s commitment to correct (as it sees it) sizing and geometry. 2020 Norco Sight range overview The 2020 Norco Sight range of all-mountain bikes come in several guises, including carbon fibre and aluminium frame options, 27.5in or 29in wheels, and women’s (W) options. Every build is available in four sizes: S, M, L and XL. A frame-only carbon option is also available. Sight C frameset The Sight is available as a framekit. Norco Frame: Sight carbon front triangle, aluminium rear, 150mm travel Wheelsize: 27.5in or 29in Shock: Fox Factory Float X2, HSC/LSC, HSR/LSR Seatpost clamp: Norco alloy nutted clamp Rear hub axle: TransX 12mm TA alloy with Allen key Price: £2,695 / €2,999 Sight CSE The Norco Sight CSE is the top of the range model. Norco Frame: Sight carbon front triangle/seatstay, aluminum chainstay, 150mm travel 27.5in or 29in wheels Fork: Fox 36 Factory Float 160mm travel, HSC/LSC/LSR, GRIP 2, short off Shock: Fox Factory Float X2, HSC/LSC, HSR/LSR Shifting: SRAM X01 Eagle AXS Crankset: Truvativ Descendant Eagle Carbon, 29in – 30t, 27.5in – 32t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle XG1295, 10-50t Seatpost: RockShox Reverb AXS, S/M – 150mm, L –170mm, L/XL – 200mm (not AXS) Brakes: SRAM Code RSC Hydraulic, 200mm (front)/180mm (rear) Rims: DT Swiss XMC 1200 Hubs: DT Swiss XMC 1200 carbon, 110 x 15mm Boost (front), 148 x 12mm XD driver(rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5in WT 3C/Maxx Terra/ EXO+TR, folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHR II 2.4in WT 3C/Maxx Terra/EXO+ /TR, folding (rear) Price: £8,295 / €9,999 Sight C1 The 2020 Norco Sight C1. All Sights are available with 29in or 27.5in wheels. Norco Frame: Sight carbon front triangle/seatstay, aluminum chainstay, 150mm travel 27.5in or 29in wheels Fork: RockShox Lyrik Ultimate, Charger 2, 160mm travel, RC2, short offset Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select + DebonAir Shifting: SRAM Eagle X0/X01 Crankset: Truvativ Descendant 7K, 29in – 30t, 27.5in – 34t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle XG1295, 10-50t Seatpost: RockShox Reverb Stealth Dropper, S – 150mm, M/L – 170mm, XL – 200mm Brakes: SRAM Code RSC Hydraulic, 200mm (front)/180mm (rear) Rims: e*thirteen LG1 EN Hubs: DT Swiss 350 110 x 15mm (front), 148 x 12mm XD driver(rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5in WT 3C/Maxx Terra/ EXO+TR, folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHR II 2.4in WT 3C/Maxx Terra/EXO+ /TR, folding (rear) Price: £5,795 / €6,999 Sight C2 2020 Norco Sight C2 with carbon front triangle and aluminium chainstays. Norco Frame: Sight carbon front triangle/seatstay, aluminum chainstay, 150mm travel 27.5 or 29in wheels Fork: Fox 36 Performance Elite, 160mm travel, HSC/LSC, HSR/LSR, GRIP 2, short offset Shock: Fox FLOAT X2 Performance, LSC/LSR Shifting: Shimano XT/ XT SL-M8100, 12-speed rapid fire Crankset: Shimano Deore XT Hollowtech, 29in – 32t, 27.5in – 34t, 170mm Cassette: Shimano SLX, 10-51t Seatpost: TransX YSP-39JL Dropper, S – 150mm, M/L – 170mm, XL – 200mm, 1x lever Brakes Shimano SLX 4 piston, 200mm (front) / 180mm (rear) Rims: Stans Flow D Hubs: Shimano XT 110 x 15mm (front), 148 x 12mm (rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5in WT 3C/Maxx Terra/EXO+/TR, folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHR II 2.4in WT 3C/ Maxx Terra/EXO+/TR, folding (rear) Price: £4,695 / €5,599 Sight C3 The Sight C3. Norco says it designed the Sight with a short seat tube and long dropper posts in mind. Norco Frame: Sight carbon front triangle/seatstay, aluminum chainstay, 150mm travel 27.5in or 29in wheels Fork: RockShox Lyrik Select Charger RC, 160mm travel, short offset Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select + DebonAir Shifting: SRAM Eagle SX Crankset: SRAM Eagle SX 30t Steel, 29in – 32t, 27.5in – 34t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle SX PG1210, 11-50t Seatpost: TransX YSP-39JL Dropper, S – 150mm, M/L – 170mm, XL – 200mm, 1x lever Brakes: Shimano BR-MT520 4 piston, 200mm (front)/180mm (rear) Rims: WTB ST I29 TCS 2.0 Hubs: Shimano Deore 110 x 15mm (front), 148 x 12mm (rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5in WT, EXO TR, folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHRII 2.4in WT EXO TR, folding (rear) Price: £3,795 / €4,599 Sight A1 and Sight A1 W The Sight A1 is the top-spec aluminium bike in the range. Norco Frame: Sight aluminium 150mm travel, 27.5in or 29in wheels Fork: RockShox Lyrik Ultimate Charger 2, 160mm travel RC2, short offset Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select + DebonAir Shifting: SRAM Eagle GX Crankset: Truvativ Descendant 6K Eagle, 29in – 32t, 27.5in – 34t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle GX PG1275, 10-50t Seatpost: TransX YSP-39JL Dropper, S – 150mm, M/L – 170mm, XL – 200mm, 1x lever Brakes: SRAM Code RSC Hydraulic, 200mm (front)/180mm (rear) Rims: e*thirteen LG1 EN Hubs: DT Swiss 350 110 x 15mm (front), 148 x 12mm XD driver (rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 3C 2.5in WT 3C Maxx Terra EXO+TR Folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHR II 2.4in WT 3C Maxx Terra EXO+ TR Folding (rear) Price: £3,795 / €4,599 Sight A2 and Sight A2 W The 2020 Norco Sight A2 is also available in a women’s version. Norco Frame: Sight aluminium 150mm travel, 27.5in or 29in wheels Fork: Fox Float 36 Rhythm 160mm travel. Sweep adjust, short offset Shock: Fox Float X2 Performance LSC/LSR Shifting: SRAM Eagle NX/GX Crankset: Truvativ Descendant 6K Eagle, 29in – 32t, 27.5in – 34t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle NX PG1230, 10-50t Seatpost: TransX YSP-39JL Dropper, S – 150mm, M/L – 170mm, XL – 200mm, 1x lever Brakes: SRAM Code R Hydraulic, 200mm (front)/180mm (rear) Rims: Stans Flow D, black 32H Hubs: DT Swiss 370 15 x 110mm (front), 148x12mm (rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5in WT EXO TR Folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHRII 2.4in WT EXO TR Folding (rear) Price: £2,995 / €3,599 Sight A3 and Sight A3 W Norco’s entry-level aluminium Sight A3. Norco Frame: Sight aluminium 150mm travel, 27.5in or 29in wheels Fork: RockShox Yari RC Motion Control 160mm travel, short offset Shock: RockShox Deluxe Select R Shifting: SRAM Eagle SX Crankset: SRAM Eagle X1 DUB, 29in – 32t, 27.5in – 34t, 170mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle SX PG1210, 11-50t Seatpost: TransX YSP-39JL Dropper, S – 150mm, M/L – 170mm, XL – 200mm, 1x lever Brakes: Shimano BR-MT420 four piston hydraulic, 200mm (front)/180mm (rear) Rims: WTB ST I29 TCS 2.0 Hubs: Shimano Deore 110 x 15mm (front), 148 x 12mm (rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5in WT EXO TR Folding (front); Maxxis Minion DHRII 2.4in WT EXO TR Folding (rear) Price: £2,295 / €2,799 2020 Norco Sight FS 27.5 Youth The Norco Sight FS Youth is available in one size and with 27.5in wheels. Norco Norco is also offering an aluminium 27.5in wheeled, 140mm rear wheel travel Sight Youth, available in one size only, which Norco says will fit a rider height of 4ft 9in to 5ft 2in. The bike has “generous standover clearance”, a lighter shock tune for a “more forgiving ride under lighter riders”, youth contact points (grips, seat and pedals) and uses the company’s Ride Aligned research and system in its geometry and setup. Frame: 6061 alloy, 140mm travel Fork: RockShox Pike, Charger, 150mm travel, 37mm offset Shock: Rockshox Deluxe R Select Debonair 2 Crankset: SRAM Eagle SX PowerSpline, 165mm Cassette: SRAM Eagle PG 1210, 11-50t Seatpost: JD TransX Light Action Dropper, 120mm Brakes: Shimano BR-MT500 hydraulic, 180mm (front/rear) Rims: WTB STP I25, tubeless-ready Hubs: Shimano Deore 110 x 15mm Boost (front); 148 x 12mm Boost (rear) Tyres: Maxxis Minion DHF EXO / TR 27.5 x 2.3in, Folding, Skinwall (front); Maxxis Minion DHR II EXO / TR 27.5 x 2.3in, Folding, Skinwall (rear) Price: £2,295 / €2,699

Posted by
Bike Radar