4 - 07/08/2019 16:17:28

The Giant Reign is a classic in the enduro segment. It was a mainstay of Enduro racing’s formative years. However, things have been quiet around the bike and it’s become quite dated. That’s all about to change with the new Giant Reign 29 – we’ve put it to the test. The flagship model: the Giant Reign Advanced Pro 0 | Travel: 160/156 mm | wheel size: 29″| Price: € 8,500 | Weight 13.10 kg (size medium) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Less is more, or why 146 mm travel is enough Giant isn’t a brand that follows every trend and it often takes the truly gigantic bike manufacturer some time to implement changes, but when Giant do something, they do it right. Which is exactly what they did with the Reign 29. As the name suggests, the bike rolls on big 29″ wheels and it comes with 160 mm travel up front and 146 mm at the rear. It may not sound like much at first, but to Giant, the quality of the travel is more important than the length. The goal was to create a bike that responds sensitively yet offers enough reserves for hard hits, all without wallowing its travel and making the bike feel cumbersome. Giant are continuing with their proprietary Maestro linkage on the new Reign 29, offering 146 mm travel. The Maestro linkage on the new Reign has been further refined, reducing the leverage ratio to 16% progression (0-100% travel). This achieves a more constant rebound rate and thus offers more traction. The new Giant Reign 29 in detail Giant have invested a lot of time in refining the lines of the new bike. It now looks a lot better. Interesting fact: many of the new accents and colours were inspired by the women’s brand, LIV. A highlight of the new Reign 29 Advanced Pro 0 is its Chameleon paint job, which shimmers different colours depending on the light. Of course, Giant haven’t only revised the rear linkage and gone for larger wheels, the frame itself has also been updated. The main pivot point has been moved further forward, allowing you to insert the seat post deeper into the seat tube. This means that the Reign is now compatible with longer dropper posts. Speaking of compatibility, the new Reign 29 also has enough room in the front triangle to accommodate a water bottle and the carbon fibre models are FOX Live Valve ready. Giant have pushed the main pivot point forward so that it no longer obstructs long dropper posts The Reign 29’s rocker link is made of carbon fibre across the range The front triangle will happily accommodate a large water bottle Giant rely on a carbon fibre rocker link and Trunnion Mount shock across the range (including the aluminium models). Unfortunately, Giant haven’t changed the cable routing and still use the same rubber plugs, which often detached themselves from the frame in the past. The chainstay protector also seems like a bit of a half-hearted effort compared to the elaborately crafted versions seen on the bikes of many of their competitors. Something’s missing. The chainstay protector is rather short. Although we didn’t encounter any problems with the large 34T chainring on our test bike, you’ll risk damaging the paintwork if you decide to fit a smaller chainring. We would have preferred a BSA BB in place of the press-fit version. However, according to Giant, the latter requires significantly more space, which wasn’t available due to the Maestro linkage. Giant have long been using the same rubber plugs for their cable inlets – and they’ve long been a source of frustration. Too bad that Giant are still using them on the Reign 29. All the latest trends combined – the geometry of the new Reign Longer, slacker, lower – these are the latest trends in the geometry of Enduro bikes. The Reign also ticks all of these boxes. For example, the 65° head angle is slack, the 493 mm reach in size L is long, and the bottom bracket with a drop of 30 mm is pleasantly low for quick direction changes. Giant also rely on short offset forks with either 42 mm (RockShox) or 44 mm (FOX). The stack height is rather low compared to the length of the bike. The 439 mm chainstays are neither very long nor exaggeratedly short. Giant combine a slack 65° head angle with a short offset fork Size S M L XL Seat tube 431 mm 431 mm 464 mm 496 mm Top tube 573 mm 600 mm 640 mm 665 mm Head tube 100 mm 110 mm 110 mm 120 mm Head angle 65° 65° 65° 65° Seat angle 76.8° 76.8° 76.8° 76.8° Chainstays 439 mm 439 mm 439 mm 439 mm BB Drop 30 mm 30 mm 30 mm 30 mm Wheelbase 1,188 mm 1,215 mm 1,258 mm 1,265 mm Reach 428 mm 455 mm 493 mm 516 mm Stack 619 mm 619 mm 628 mm 637 mm Three carbon, two aluminium and one very special Reign model Giant is offering the new Reign 29 in three carbon versions called the Reign Advanced Pro, as well as two aluminium Reign 29 1 and Reign 29 2 models. As in the past, there will also be a Reign SX model featuring a 170 mm travel fork and a coil shock. The Reign 29 SX is based on the same aluminium ALUXX SL frame. A bike for those who like it rough: the new 2020 Giant Reign SX The Giant Reign SX comes with 170mm travel up front … … combined with a coil shock at the rear. Giant have their right priorities right, speccing a high-quality Grip2 fork… …saving on the rear derailleur instead – relying on SRAM’s NX Eagle. Pricing for the new Reign 29 starts at a fair € 2,900 for the Reign 2 followed by the Reign SX for € 3,799. The most affordable Reign Advanced Pro will set you back by € 4,300. For the flagship Reign Advanced Pro 0, you’ll have to pay € 8,500. The Reign Advanced Pro 0 features FOX Factory suspension with Grip2 damping on the 36 fork. Giant also spec their lightweight TRX carbon wheelset, which is available aftermarket with DT 240 hubs for around € 2,000. 200 mm brake rotors on the front and rear ensure maximum braking power. Unfortunately, Giant don’t take full advantage of the new seat tube/rocker mount design and opt for a 150 mm dropper post on the L and XL bikes – we would have wanted a 175 mm model. Race-ready: the chain guide, bash guard and a 34T chainring will delight racers. Less fit riders will have to downgrade to a 32T or 30T model. All models come with a 12-speed SRAM Eagle drivetrain and high-quality MAXXIS tires. Unfortunately, only the flagship model is specced with the more robust EXO+ variant – even the SX has to make do with the EXO casing. Despite the improvement in the design of the seat tube/rocker mount, GIANT continue to fit rather short dropper posts. The S comes with a 100 mm dropper, the M with 125 mm and the L and XL with 150 mm. The models specced with RockShox suspension don’t get piggy-back shocks either. In our eyes, the bike offering the best value for money is the Reign 1 with a FOX 36 Performance Elite Grip2 fork and X2 shock, SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain and CODE R brakes. The flagship Advanced Pro 0 leaves nothing to be desired, built up with carbon wheels and complete FOX factory suspension. You also get the Chameleon paint job that shimmers different colours depending on the light. Die Ausstattungsvarianten im Überblick Reign Advanced Pro 29 0 Reign Advanced Pro 29 1 Reign Advanced Pro 29 2 Reign 29 1 Reign 29 2 Reign 29 SX Fork Fox 36 Float GRIP2 RockShox Lyrik Select Fox 36 Performance Elite GRIP2 RockShox Yari RC Fox 36 Performance Elite GRIP2 Shock Fox Float X2 Factory Fox Float X2 RockShox Deluxe select+ Fox X2 Performance RockShox Deluxe Select+ Fox DHX2 Performance Elite Brakes SRAM Code RSC SRAM Code R Shimano MT520 SRAM Code R Shimano MT520 SRAM Code R Drivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle SRAM GX Eagle SRAM NX Eagle SRAM GX Eagle SRAM NX Eagle SRAM NX Eagle Wheels Giant TRX-0 29 WheelSystem Giant TR-1 29 WheelSystem Giant AM 29, tubeless ready Giant TR-1 29 WheelSystem Giant AM 29, tubeless ready Giant AM 29, tubeless ready Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5 WT/ DHRII 2.4 (v/h) – TR/3C/EXO/MaxxTerra Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth Giant Contact Switch dropper post Price € 8,500 € 4,999 € 4,300 € 4,000 € 2,900 € 3,799 googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The Giant Reign 29 Advanced Pro 0 on the trail To test the Giant Reign 29 Advanced, we travelled to Revelstoke in Canada. There we were able to put the Reign 29’s climbing capabilities to the test on a technical uphill trail as well as some relaxed forest service roads on the first day. The riding position is pleasantly central, and the seat angle sufficiently steep so that you never feel like you’re pedalling from too far behind, even with the shock open and the saddle not pushed all the way forward. On even terrain such as forest roads, you can feel the rear suspension bobbing slightly, but it never wallows. It can be worth reaching for the climb switch in those situations, depending on personal preference. On technical climbs, the Reign offers a lot of traction and willingly climbs uphill. Thanks to the low weight of just 13.10 kg (manufacturers specs), the bike is pleasantly fleet-footed – but it’s still an enduro bike, of course. In tight sections, it takes some effort to get the front wheel around the corners. Due to the low bottom bracket in combination with the 170 mm cranks, you also have to be careful with the timing of your pedal strokes or risk snagging them on roots or rocks as we did several times. Despite its length and travel, the Giant Reign 29 climbs very efficiently – at least with the high-end spec. When the trail points downhill, you immediately notice how much room you’ve got to move around on the bike. You feel super integrated between the big wheels, which instils you with a lot of confidence from the get-go. Let go of the brakes and the bike quickly picks up speed with the rear end sensitively absorbing irregularities on the trail. We have to praise the FOX Factory suspension at this point for its super sensitive and very defined performance. The fork and rear suspension harmonise well despite the difference in travel, always providing plenty of traction. Although it’s long, the bike doesn’t feel sluggish. The rear end provides a lot of pop and mid-stroke support which makes it easy to get the bike airborne or spontaneously change direction. Quickly switch to the high-line before you hit that turn? No problem! Thanks to the long front triangle, the bike instils you with confidence The weight distribution between the wheels is somewhat back-heavy, which means that you have to shift your body weight forward to generate enough grip on the front wheel in flat sections and tight corners. However, if the terrain is steep enough and you’re going fast, the bike’s handling is very intuitive and extremely composed. Active riders will be able to ride the bike very directly but also get loose. The bike invites you to flick it into corners. You have to keep your weight on the front wheel for it not to wash out in the corners. From alpine adventures to the next Enduro race – the Reign 29 can do it all. Provided the terrain is sufficiently challenging, or the bike will quickly get bored. On steep and rough trails, the bike feels composed and instils the rider with confidence. Just let the brakes go and hold on. We would only have wanted a longer travel dropper post to get the saddle even further out the way. Due to the short head tube, we would also advise adding a few more spacers under the stem, which in turn reduces the reach by a few millimetres. The componentry proved to be reliable in our test and was perfectly suitable for the application. The carbon wheels were neither too stiff nor uncomfortable. We didn’t encounter any issues during the two days that we tested. Conclusion The Giant Reign 29 convinced us on demanding trails with its enormous composure and stability. Thanks to its active suspension, it doesn’t feel slow or cumbersome either. This is a bike that will put a smile on the faces of experienced racers as well as weekend warriors that typically ride rough and demanding trails. it climbs efficiently too. We would only have wanted a little more attention to detail on the frame. Topsvery stable, composed handlingexcellently balanced suspensionhard to beat on steep terraingood value for moneygood climbing characteristicsFlopsboring on flat trailstechnical climbs require physical effort and good crank timinga lot of room for improvement with regards to cable routing and chainstay protection For more info head to: giant-bicycles.com

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Enduro MTB - RSS
2 - 02/08/2019 07:34:33

After two years and 300 HB.160s sold, there are some new things coming from Barnoldswick. The Hope HB.130 keeps the sleek design and technical innovations that made the HB.160 such a unique bike but comes with 130 mm travel, 29” wheels and completely updated geometry. Hope HB.130 | 140/130 mm (f/r) | € 7,500 | 13.1 kg googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Hope’s mantra “If we can make it in-house, we will make it in-house” holds true for the new HB.130. The carefully constructed carbon main frame, the exquisitely machined rear end and basically all components except for the tires, drivetrain and suspension come directly from the Hope factory in Barnoldswick, England. If you get your kicks from anodised, machined titillation you should be quite happy here. As the name suggests, the HB.130 offers 130 mm travel at the rear, is fitted with a 140 mm fork and rolls on 29” wheels. The bike comes in just one high-end spec that cost € 7,500 and weighs 13.1 kg. If you have your own particular wishes on spec and finishing kit, the HB.130 will also be available as a frameset for € 4,700. That obviously sounds like a lot of money, but the package you get is much more than just a frame and a shock. More on that in a second. Let’s start with the most exciting part. The Hope HB.130 is manufactured almost completely in England – only the tires, drivetrain and suspension come from external suppliers. The black logos are sandwiched between two layers of paint. If you’re after a more individual look, coloured sticker kits are available that sit in exactly the same place, though on top of the paint. Hope HB.130 geometry – a modern 29er Trail bike Developing the HB.160 in a manufacturable and production-ready bike turned out to be quite a challenge and cost a lot of time, which is why its geometry ended up being dated when it was released. The new HB.130 profited from the manufacturing experience Hope gained, allowing full attention to be placed on updating the geometry. The wheel size, travel and Trail bike intentions set the brief for the design. Continuous development over two years and three prototypes resulted in this, the fourth iteration and the production version of the HB.130. The numbers speak for themselves and on paper, the bike is a modern Trail bike with a reach of 470 mm, a head angle of 66° and a seat tube angle of 75.7° (all for a size L). The angles and bottom bracket height can be adjusted with a flip chip which actually makes a noticeable difference in handling and broadens the range of riding the HB.130 can do. We’ll look at this in more detail in our first ride impressions. The Hope HB.130 will initially be available only in sizes M, L and XL, though if there’s enough demand, a size S may also be added. Hope has learnt from the mistakes of the HB.160 – the geometry of the HB.130 is bang up to date. The flip chip offers you the choice of two geometries – low or high. We recommend the slacker setting for more fun on the downhills. Größe M L XL Sattelrohr 420 mm 450 mm 490 mm Oberrohr 600 mm 627 mm 654 mm Steuerrohr 100 mm 105 mm 110 mm Lenkwinkel (high/low) 66,5/66° 66,5/66° 66,5/66° Sitzwinkel (high/low) 76,7/76,2° 76,7/76,2° 76,7/76,2° Kettenstrebe 435 mm 435 mm 435 mm Tretlagerabsenkung (high/low) 33/39,5 mm 33/39,5 mm 33/39,5 mm Radstand 1191 mm 1213 mm 1235 mm Reach 455 mm 475 mm 495 mm Stack 615 mm 619 mm 624 mm About the suspension The rear end of the Hope HB.130 uses the same Horst link design featured on the HB.160 as Hope was happy with how it performed and behaved there. With the custom-tuned metric shock (210×50), the kinematics are similar to the HB.160 in the high setting and gain some additional progression in the low setting. A detailed look at the Hope HB.130’s special features The HB.130’s monocoque carbon frame has the same, sleek carbon finish as the HB.160, with just two layers of clear coat to fix the logos in place. The rear end is a labour of love that is machined from aluminium and has no visible weld seams. Unlike the HB.160, all the connections are slotted and glued together. That doesn’t only look better but allows Hope to use a non-weldable aluminium alloy that is stronger and more durable. In addition, it spares having to do the time-consuming alignment of the frame necessary to correct for slight warping during welding. The chainstays are now glued instead of welded and instead of a radial brake mount, the bike uses a Postmount fitting CNC-porn wherever the eye wanders A thick rubber protector shields the down tube The cable runs are neat and rattle-free The finishing is absolutely top class. Instead of the radial brake mount that required special brake callipers, the rear brake now uses the normal Postmount standard for maximum compatibility. The bottom bracket area has also been updated and now uses a threaded BB – though in Hope’s own proprietary 46 mm format. However, it does offer the option to fit any of the current crank axle standards on the bike and Hope offers bearings to suit each one. The other welcome new feature is the space for a large bottle in the frame. Just like the HB.160, the HB.130 uses 130 mm spacing for the rear end with a special hub to fit That makes the rear slightly narrower and ensures a rear wheel with even spoke angles The HB.130 keeps the special 130 mm rear dropouts and 17 mm thru-axle. That reduces “wasted” space on the brake side while maintaining effectively the same flange spacing as on a Boost hub. Theoretically, the biggest advantage of this system is that the spoke angles on each side are equal, resulting in a stiffer and more durable rear wheel. However, it does also limit you to using only the special Hope hubs as no other manufacturer builds hubs around this format. Spec, availability and service Like the HB.160, the Hope HB.130 will only be available in a single base build, though with various upgrade options. For € 7,500 you get FOX Factory suspension with a 36 GRIP2 fork and DPX2 shock. The suspension can be changed to Öhlins kit consisting of a RXF 36 EVO fork and a TTX air shock, free of charge. The bike comes fitted with a SRAM X01 Eagle groupset, though the cranks can be upgraded to Hope’s own offering for an extra € 360. Further upgrade options include the Santa Cruz Reserve 30 carbon rims and a SRAM Eagle AXS groupset. The Hope HB.130 is available as either a frameset or a high-spec complete build High-end build or dream custom bike – the Hope HB.130 is also available as a frameset. Except for the dropper remote, everything in this image is Hope The HB-logoed hubs are only available with the HB.130 complete built or frameset You also have the option to specify options such as your stem, crank or dropper length, rim width, rotor size of the Tech 3 E4 brakes and the colour of the large array of anodised Hope parts for free. You can choose from seven colours, though Team Green is only available for selected parts. If you desire, you have the option of seven different colours for all the anodised Hope parts as well as decals How about silver? Or stealth black? The suspension can also be upgraded to the Öhlins suspension here free of charge. Hope HB.130 complete build Fork FOX 36 Factory GRIP2 140 mm Schock FOX DPX2 Factory 3 Pos. 130 mm Brakes Hope Tech 3 E4 160/180/200 mm Drivetrain SRAM X01 Eagle Seatpost FOX Transfer, 125/150 mm Stem Hope AM, 35/50 Handlebar Hope Carbon 780 mm Wheelset Hope PRO4 Naben, Hope FORTUS 26 Felgen (verschiedene Felgenbreiten möglich) 29″ Tires MAXXIS Minion DHF/MAXXIS Minion DHR 2.5WT/2.3″ Price € 7,500 Optional Upgrades Hope Evo cranks: € 360 SRAM Eagle AXS: tbd Öhlins RXF 36 Evo fork + TTX shock: no extra cost Santa Cruz Reserve 30 carbon-rims: 1.695 € (complete build), 2.200 € (aftermarket) Sticker kit (8 colours available): 38 € The HB.130 is also available as a frameset. Because of its proprietary standards, the frame-only package includes the frame, shock and headset along with a bottom bracket and hubs as well. Hope HB.130 Frameset Shock FOX DPX2 Factory 3 Pos. 130 mm Bottom bracket Hope HB Headset Hope HB Saddle clamp Hope Hubs Hope PRO4 HB Edition Price € 4,700 The HB.130 will be available from the middle/end of September but can be ordered immediately. The delivery time for the standard spec is anticipated at 3–4 weeks as due to its involved production, it’s not feasible to make more than 5–6 frames per week. Hope is justifiably proud of its high-quality manufacturing and offers a lifetime guarantee – of the 300 existing HB.160s, not one has come back for warranty. If you want, you can also pick up your bike in Barnoldswick and get a factory tour thrown in as well. Helmet 100% ALTEC Glasses Oakley Jawbreaker Prizm Trail Shirt Fasthouse Jody Tech Tee Shorts POC Resistance Enduro Pads POC Joint VPD System Knee Schuhe O’Neal FLOW SPD Hip Pack High Above Lookout Pack Hope HB.130 first ride impressions As mentioned before, the HB.130 is endowed with modern geometry that makes you feel at ease as soon as you get on. The reach is comfortable, the seat tube angle neither too steep nor too slack and the bottom bracket is relatively low, letting you feel completely at one with the bike. With the flip chip in the high position you can surmount basically any climb without the front wheel lifting – the only limit will be your fitness or lack of low enough gearing. Even with the slightly slacker seat angle in the low setting, the bike still ascends without any problems and keep the front wheel planted. However, we would advice moving your saddle forwards to stay in complete control. The Horst link suspension has a tendency to bob when the shock is in open mode and it’s definitely helpful to use the climb switch for long uphill sections. The Hope HB.130 is an outstanding and versatile companion even on longer riding trips Steep uphills, technical trails, high-speed flow – the HB.130 is versatile and won’t let you miss out on any fun. The Hope HB.130 climbs extremely well. Unfortunately, the rear end has a tendency to bob up and down so you’re better of reaching for the climb switch on the shock. Thie bike offers a well-integrated riding position and the suspension is sensitive and plush On the way downhill, the rear end reveals just how capable it is, particularly when in the low setting. The HB.130 sticks to the ground, swallowing bumps effectively with good progression at the end of the suspension stroke, while being able to deal with big hits too. The handling can be descrbed as intuitive, quick and precise without feeling nervous at high speeds. The FOX 36 GRIP2 fork suits the character of the bike very well. In the high setting, the handling is similar, though the front end reacts even more sensitively, requiring a little more concentration. Given that the bike seems to climb just as willingly in both settings, the low option should be perfect for everyone except the most hardcore XC racers or long-distance riders. The agile and manoeuvrable handling is perfect for technical sections … … as well as blazingly fast high speed trails. Conclusion The Hope HB.130 is pretty much exactly the bike that the HB.160 should have been. A versatile and modern bike that scores points with its downhill performance, but will be just as happy with you spending long days in the saddle. At € 7,500 it’s not cheap but arguably offers acceptable value for money when you consider the manufacturing quality, manual labour and above all the excellent service and support that’s behind it. As a customisable English piece of crafted technology, this is basically a must-have for Hope fans and definitely an interesting option for anyone looking for something a bit different. Topsexcellent geometryincredibly high-end finishingcomprehensive customisation optionsversatileFlopsrear end tends to bob when pedalling uphill For more information visit: hopetechhb.com

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Enduro MTB - RSS
4 - 01/08/2019 10:51:33

This is a list of the best mountain bikes for under £500 according to the findings of our expert testers. The world of budget mountain bikes can seem like a bit of a minefield, but fortunately, you’re in the right place. It’s totally possible to get something that’s up to the task of proper off-road riding without breaking the bank, but there’s a big difference between how durable and enjoyable the best budget mountain bikes are compared to the not-so-great. If you can afford to spend a little more, check out our best mountain bikes under £750. Best mountain bike: how to choose the right one for you The best mountain bikes under £750 Cheap bikes: what you should look for The best mountain bikes under £500 in 2019 VooDoo Hoodoo: £550 Calibre Two Cubed: £400 Vitus Nucleus 29 VR: £500 Calibre Rake: £450 VooDoo Aizan: £500 Voodoo Hoodoo (2018) 5.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The 2018 Voodoo Hoodoo is the best bike you can buy for under £500. Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Superb geometry Great build for the cash Stealth dropper routing Halfords’ Voodoo bikes have always been market leaders in the sub-£600 price bracket. The 2018 edition of the legendary Hoodoo will leave competitors cursing with the frame features, handling and overall kit level of the bike putting it back into pole position. The 1×10 Shimano/FSA drivetrain is superb out of the box and the frameset is built around stealth dropper routing. It’s worth noting that the RRP of this bike is £550 but it’s rarely, if ever, seen at this price, with Halfords usually discounting it to the sub-£500 mark, hence why we have decided to include it in this list. Read our full review of the Voodoo Hoodoo (2018) Calibre Rake 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Calibre’s Rake is an awesome trail bike for the money. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Up to date geometry Well-controlled suspension fork Grippy front tyre Calibre proves that decent geometry doesn’t have to cost any extra. With a long, low and slack geometry the Rake is an easy bike to jump on and shred. Add in a decent suspension fork at the front paired with a grippy 29-inch front tyre and the bike will give you stacks of confidence. Calibre’s pricing means value is high, and its reputation gets better by the year. If you’re looking for a confident and capable bike on a budget, the Rake simply has to be near the top of your list. Read our full review of the Calibre Rake Calibre Two Cubed 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Two Cubed replaces the Two.Two. Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Bang-on-trend long and slack geometry Hydraulic brakes are rare for the price Decent Shimano Altus drivetrain The Calibre Two Cubed replaced the Two.Two, which formerly came as our top recommendation in this very list. The Two Cubed builds on this heritage and, while a bike of this price will always have to compromise somewhere, the modern geometry and smooth handling more than make up for what it may lack in terms of build. The sub-£500 mountain bike market is a more fiercely fought market than ever before, so when compared to the competition the Two Cubed just missed out on a full five-star score. But if you’re after a bike on a budget, you’re unlikely to be disappointed by this one. Read our full review ofthe Calibre Two Cubed Vitus Nucleus 29 VR 4.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Nucleus is a great bike that is ripe for upgrades. Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Great geometry Particularly good wheelset for the money Easily upgradeable The Vitus Nucleus 29 VR is a properly trail-ready 29er that is built around a superb frame that will delight out of the box but is ripe for upgrades. The wheels, built with WTB’s i29 rims, are properly tubeless ready, which is rare at this price. Read our full review of the Vitus Nucleus 29 CR Voodoo Aizan 4.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Voodoo’s Aizan is a great budget 29er. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Long, relaxed geometry makes for an easy riding bike 29in wheels help the Aizan roll over obstacles All-round performance The Aizan is a great option if you’re looking for an all-rounder mountain bike. That’s because the relative light weight and bigger wheels mean it’ll cross ground efficiently, while the geometry is friendly enough that there is plenty of control on offer. A few choice kit upgrades can also easily change the character of the bike, so if it’s not 100 percent to your tastes, it shouldn’t take too much to get it feeling just right, which aids the bike’s versatility. Read our full review of the Voodoo Aizan Also consider: Pinnacle Kapur 2 3.5 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Kapur is a great bike that is let down by its geometry. Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media Confidence-inspiring modern cockpit Decent Shimano groupset for the money An otherwise great bike let down by outdated geometry The Kapur 2 is the mid-priced option in Evans’ budget hardtail range. It has a spec that is superior to many similarly-priced bikes — its fork is better than expected and its steering control makes it ready for some rowdy riding — but the frameset features fairly outdated geometry. Read our full review of the Pinnacle Kapur 2 Saracen Tufftrax Comp Disc 3.0 out of 5 star rating Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Saracen’s Tufftrax might be one to consider. Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media Light, lively feel Easy to upgrade Fork lacks performance of pricier models The Tufftrax Comp Disc is one of few bikes at this price-point that performs well and is available from a traditional bike shop. While this may make it easier to buy, it also means that value suffers. The frame’s geometry is more traditional than some of the higher-rated bikes, but if you aren’t looking to hit anything too gnarly, this may not be an issue. The frame is relatively upgradeable, but it’s fair to say that the SR Suntour fork struggles against some of its competitors. Read out full review of the Saracen Tufftrax Comp Disc Carrera Vendetta Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Carrera’s Vendetta is a top-performer. Russell Burton / Immediate Media Modern geometry Plus-width tyres give loads of grip Often available on offer The Carrera Vendetta is unique in this list because it uses ‘plus tyres’. These are usually 2.8in to 3in wide, meaning you can run them at lower pressures. This gives two distinct benefits, especially at this price: lower pressures mean more grip, which boosts confidence, and it also aids comfort, which makes the bike more enjoyable to ride. Carrera has also given the Vendetta a great frame geometry, making it a confidence-inspiring ride. While we’ve not done a full review yet, our initial impressions are that this is a far more capable bike than you might imagine. Carrera Vendetta first ride review Don’t forget that the UK’s Cycle To Work Scheme allows you to buy a bike worth up to £1,000, so it may be worth checking out our roundup of the best mountain bikes under £1,000. For more information on buying a new mountain bike, check out our buyer’s guide to the best mountain bikes. Best value mountain bike: what should I look for? Trust us, the price of the bike doesn’t always matter — just get out and ride! Andy Lloyd / Immediate Media The heart of any bike is the frame. For a mountain bike under £500, you’ll generally want to be looking for a frame made of aluminium rather than heavier and cheaper steel — steel can be a great material to make bikes from, but at this price point, it’s best avoided, generally speaking. The next thing you need to think about in your search for a budget mountain bike is the kit that makes it stop and go. The number of gears the bike has isn’t the be all and end all, but a higher number of gears often means smaller steps between shifts and a wider total range, which can be really important when you’re hauling up a big hill. At £500 or under, having nine gears at the back paired to a crank with three rings up front is ideal, but cheaper bikes may have just eight at the rear. Getting going is useless unless you can stop, and happily most bikes at this price now come with disc brakes, which offer much better, all-conditions performance than brakes that use the rim of the wheel to stop. Brakes that use hydraulic fluid rather than cables are a big plus too because they require less maintenance and give more consistent stopping power. When it comes to tyres, it’s worth deciding how much time you’re likely to spend actually riding the bike off-road. If you just fancy a bike for getting to work or very occasional off-road use, but don’t fancy the looks or riding position of road bikes or hybrid bikes, then a mountain bike is a good choice, but proper knobbly off-road tyres will make the going hard. It’s worth asking if the shop doesn’t mind switching the tyres to slicks or hybrid tyres that have a mix of knobbly tread for cornering grip on the edge and a flatter centre for pedalling speed. Suspension forks are a big plus when it comes to control and comfort off-road, but because many forks can cost £500 (or double that) just on their own, the units fitted at this price can vary wildly in performance and longevity — as well as the adjustment control on offer. So pay particular attention to this. While it seems like a downgrade, a rigid (non-suspension) fork can be a good choice on a lower priced bike because the money saved can be used on other areas of the bike that may have a bigger impact on performance. What should I avoid? In mountain bikes under £500 it’s difficult (if not impossible) to get a full suspension bike that’s any good. Quite simply, it’s going to be significantly heavier and it’s likely to offer very little advantage in comfort or control. In fact, quite the opposite, because many will lack any form of damping control — imagine riding a heavy pogo stick with wheels. Weight is an inevitable side-effect with budget mountain bikes, especially because mountain bikes need to be able to take a beating. Our reviews will list the weight and the effect it has, but cheaper bikes inevitably take a bit more effort to get up the hills than more expensive machines. It’s not all bad though, just think about how much fitter and faster you’ll be.

Posted by
Bike Radar
4 - 26/07/2019 07:17:28

On paper, the RADON SWOOP 9.0 leaves nothing to be desired: brilliant suspension, high-end spec and an unbeatably low price. In the end, it only barely missed the top spot on the trail and it’s a very exciting option for a lot of riders. Here you’ll find an overview of the best budget enduro bike 2019 in test Radon Swoop 9.0 | € 2,999 | 170/170 mm (f/r) | 14.50 kg | 29″ googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The RADON SWOOP 9.0 proves that you just can’t go wrong with a stealth black finish. Compared to the lower end SWOOP 8.0, which we’ve reviewed previously, the stealth black version looks quite a bit better. The spec also features high-quality SRAM CODE R brakes, a GX Eagle drivetrain and lighter DT Swiss E1700 wheels. The FOX 36 Performance Elite fork provides 170mm travel. Unfortunately, the frame itself seems rather makeshift. The area around the bottom bracket looks a bit untidy and is prone to collect dirt, while the 3 mm bolt used to mount the shock is quite small and we’d prefer hex bolts in place of the Phillips screws that hold the flip-chip in place. The flip-chip provides three different geometry positions to choose from. We liked the middle position best during testing. With the RADON you get a lot of great components at a fair price – and it performs well too. Helmet MET Parachute MCR | Glasses 100% Accuri | Jersey iXS VIBE 8.1 | Pants Specialized Demo Pants | Shoes Specialized 2FO Cliplite The RADON SWOOP 9.0 in detail Fork FOX 36 FLOAT Performance Elite Grip2 170 mm Shock FOX FLOAT DPX2 Performance Elite 170 mm Brakes SRAM Code R 200/180 Drivetrain SRAM GX Eagle Seatpost FOX Transfer 150 mm Stem Race Face Turbine R 40 mm Handlebar Race Face Turbine R 800 mm Wheels DT Swiss E1700 Spline Tires Schwalbe Magic Mary / Hans Dampf 2.35″ Top classThe FOX 36 Performance Elite has the same internals as the FOX Factory version, except for the golden Kashima coating. You’ll hardly notice the difference on the trail. Too wideThe long frame combined with the very wide handlebar requires a lot of power and input from the rider. We would cut the handlebar down from 800 to at least 780 mm. Fortunately, that won’t cost you anything. Not really neededWith flip-chips, you often tend to leave them in the same setting, as we did on the RADON SWOOP 9.0. We only briefly used the slack position shown here at the beginning and left it in the middle setting for the remainder of the test. UntidyThe area around the bottom bracket of the RADON is as cluttered as a teenager’s room. Besides looking bad, it makes cleaning the bike that much more of a chore. Too shortAs you can see in the background, the chainstay protector is clearly too short. This makes for a loud chain. Size M L XL Seat tube 435 mm 455 mm 475 mm Top tube 601 mm 619 mm 637 mm Head tube 110 mm 120 mm 130 mm Head angle 64.8-65.8° 64.8-65.8° 64.8-65.8° Seat angle 75.8-76.8° 75.8-76.8° 75.8-76.8° Chainstays 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm BB Drop 26 mm-39 mm 26 mm-39 mm 26 mm-39 mm Wheelbase 1,237 mm 1,255 mm 1,274 mm Reach 462 mm 476 mm 491 mm Stack 638 mm 647 mm 656 mm googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The RADON SWOOP 9.0 in review Thanks to the steep seat tube angle and the long front triangle, the pedalling position is well centred without being too upright. The RADON is one of the few bikes on which we didn’t feel the need to push the saddle forward. Thanks to the lightweight Schwalbe tires and the total weight of 14.50 kg, the bike accelerates and climbs with ease considering the amount travel on offer – brilliant! However, we still recommend activating the climb switch on the shock to completely suppress any pedal bob. On technical climbs, you also have to pay close attention to your pedals so as not to snag them on roots and rocks. Going downhill, the RADON SWOOP 9.0 really comes to life on challenging trails! The rear suspension uses its travel a little more readily with the DPX2 shock than it did with the Monarch Plus on the SWOOP 8.0. As a result, the bike generally sits deeper in its travel and takes a little more input from the rider to get into the air. Tuning tip: tougher tires | Slapper Tape for the chainstay The SWOOP is quick in implementing rapid direction changes, staying balanced and agile at all times. However, it needs an active riding style in tighter terrain. Thanks to the low bottom bracket, your weight is plenty low on the bike with the flip-chip in the middle setting. We can only recommend the slack setting for very steep and challenging trails. The rear suspension willingly makes use of its travel in the event of hard impacts, but on quick successive hits, the RADON can’t perform quite as well as the best bikes in the test. The thin-walled Schwalbe tires also lack puncture protection. Let it roll! The RADON awakens to its full potential at higher speeds. Conclusion The RADON SWOOP 9.0 delivers a convincing overall package with fantastic spec, good climbing characteristics and agile handling. If you like to go on longer rides and aren’t bothered by the makeshift look of the frame, you’ll get a lot of performance at a sensational price! Topsexcellent value for moneyvery balanced handlingclimbs willinglyfantastic specFlopsframe looks makeshiftcumbersome in tight, flat sectionsloud chainonly available from frame size M and up Riding Characteristics 12Uphill 1sluggishefficientAgility 2cumbersomeplayfulStability 3nervousconfidentHandling 4unbalancedbalancedSuspension 5harshplushFun Factor 6plantedpoppyValue for money 7terriblevery goodTechnical DataRadonSwoop 9.0Size: M L XLWeight: 14,50 kgTravel (f/r): 170/170 mmWheel Size: 29"Price: € 2,999Intended UseXC 8Trail 9Enduro 10Downhill 11 For more info head to: radon-bikes.de The test field Here you’ll find an overview of the best budget enduro bike 2019 in test All the bikes in test: Canyon Strive CF 5.0 | FOCUS SAM 8.9 | Propain Spindrift Performance | SCOTT Ransom 920 | Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Comp Alloy 29 | Trek Slash 8 | YT Capra 29 AL Comp This article is from ENDURO issue #039ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free! This scale indicates how efficiently the bike climbs. It refers to both simple and technical climbs. Along with the suspension, the riding position and the weight of the bike all play a crucial role.↩How does the bike ride and descend? How spritely is the bike, how agile is it through corners, how much fun is it in tight sections and how quickly can it change direction?↩Is the bike stable at high speeds? Is it easy to stay in control in demanding terrain? How composed is it on rough trails? Stability is a combination of balanced geometry, good suspension and the right spec.↩This is all about how balanced the bike is and particularly about how well it corners. Balanced bikes require little physical effort from the rider and are very predictable. If a bike is unbalanced, the rider has to work hard to weight the front wheel to generate enough grip. However, experienced riders can have a lot of fun even with unbalanced bikes.↩How sensitive is the suspension over small bumps? Can it absorb hard impacts and does it soak up repeated hits? Plush suspension not only provides comfort and makes a bike more capable, but it also generates traction. The rating includes the fork and the rear suspension.↩This aspect mainly comes down to the suspension. How much pop does it have, does it suck up the rider’s input or is it supportive, and how agile and direct is the bike?↩We don’t calculate value for money in an excel spreadsheet or based on how high-end a bike is specced. We are more concerned with how a bike performs on the trail and how the bike benefits the rider. What good are the best components if the bike doesn’t perform well on the trail? Expensive bikes with a lower-end spec can offer very good value for money – provided they excel where it matters. Just as supposedly cheap bikes with good components can get a bad rating if they don’t deliver on the trail.↩No, it’s not about racing, it’s about efficiency. Fast, fleet-footed and efficient – those who want to speed along flowy singletrack and gravel roads need a defined and spritely bike that accelerates with ease and efficiency. Nevertheless, reliable components are important too. We interpret XC more like the Americans do: big back-country rides instead of a marathon or XC World Cup with the ultimate in lightweight construction! Uphill-downhill ratio: 80:30 (not everything has to be 100%!)↩...also known as mountain biking. Classic singletrack with roots, rocks and ledges – sometimes flowy, sometimes rough. For this, you need a bike with good all-round qualities, whether climbing or descending. Uphill-downhill ratio: 50:50↩Even more extreme and challenging compared to Trail riding, riddled with every kind of obstacle: jumps, gaps, nasty rock gardens, ruts and roots. For this, you need (race)proven equipment that forgives mistakes and wouldn’t look out of place on a stage of the Enduro World Series. Climbing is just a means to an end. Uphill-downhill ratio: 30:70↩Strictly speaking, a 200 mm travel downhill bike is the best choice for merciless tracks with big jumps, drops and the roughest terrain. Those would be the black or double-black-diamond tracks in a bike park. But as some of the EWS pros (including Sam Hill) have proven, it’s the riding skills and not the bike that define what you can ride with it. Climbing? On foot or with a shuttle, please! Uphill-downhill ratio: 10:90↩You can find more info about our rating system in this article: Click here! ↩

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
2 - 14/07/2019 07:17:27

In the “The Lab” we present the latest products and put them through their paces for you. Some undergo long-term tests, while we check others out only briefly. This time we reveal how the Mavic Deemax Pro Flat Shoes fared. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Mavic’s Deemax Pro flat pedal shoe is the French company’s premium offering for riders who want the freedom of riding flat pedals but won’t sacrifice pedalling performance. The fit is excellent: a wide toe box keeps the blood flowing to your toes and the snug heel cup and fitted midfoot means that the Deemax shoe doesn’t need over tightening to keep your foot firmly in place, resulting in better feedback from the pedals and more control. Mavic has really thought about the details for the Deemax shoe. The upper materials are impressive; Mavic’s Kevlar ‘Matryx’ upper manages to be light, breathable, water resistant and hard wearing – quite an achievement for a single material! High stress or wear areas such as around the laces, heel and inside the ankle have a polyamide coating for further abrasion resistance. The whole shoe is welded together, rather than stitched, so there is nothing to unpick or unravel over time. The stitch-free construction and ‘state of the art’ materials makes the Deemax Pro flat shoe durable as well as light. The grippy Contragrip soles are one of the best we’ve ridden. The upper materials don’t appear to absorb water and the fairly smooth finish, cleans up easily with a quick wipe down of a cloth. Foot protection is good with a solid toe box and a semi-mid top to stop you from bashing your ankles or corners and cranks. Although the shoe materials felt stiff when new, it bedded in nicely over a few rides and became very comfortable both on and off the bike and over three months of winter and spring testing, the shoes are still looking great with no signs of wear. The literal Achilles Heel of every flat shoe is the sole: the stiffness of the mid-sole and the light overall weight means that the Deemax pedals well and the Contagrip sole compound is one of the best we have ridden. Traction between sole and pedal is very nearly as tacky as Five Ten Stealth rubber in the dry and continues to perform well, even in cool and wet conditions, with only a small reduction in grip when the temperatures plummet to near freezing and the rubber hardens. Mavic has just about nailed it with the Deemax Pro flat pedal shoe; the support, grip and comfort combined with its weight and durability has seen it become our go-to shoe, happily bombing runs at the bike park or pushing hard all-day on a trail ride. TopsGreat fit - comfortable on and off the bikeGrippy soleImpressive materials and constructionFlopsPriceA slight drop in sole compound performance below 5°C Price: € 170 Test duration: 3 months Weight: 940 g (size 46) Tester: Felix More info: mavic.com

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
2 - 13/07/2019 07:01:19

Pick the best team for this round and you can walk away with a Rockshox Reverb Stealth.( Photos: 5 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
6 - 12/07/2019 08:17:35

We’re just a mere week into the Tour de France and there’s already been some bonkers action from Alaphilippe, who at the time of writing was just still holding on to the yellow jersey. With more action to come, it’s still anyone’s guess who’s going to win the whole event or even hold on to the yellow jersey on a day-to-day basis. It’s exciting stuff watching The Tour, so check out our guide so you don’t miss a single second of the action. Specialized’s World Cup-winning Demo 29 finally hits the market How to watch the Tour de France 2019 live on TV Elsewhere in the cycling world, we’re enjoying a World Cup doubleheader of XC, XC short track and downhill that kicked off last weekend in Andorra on the impossibly technical terrain over the mountains just outside of La Massanna. In the XC, we saw Nino Schurter take the win by a mere 2 seconds over Mathias Flueckiger, while Anne Terpstra beat Jolanda Neff by a big 36-second margin. The Short Track champions were Henrique Avancini who pipped Schurter to the post and Alessandra Kelle beat Neff by a tiny margin. And in the insane downhill competition, a determined Loic Bruni and the ever-successful Rachel Atherton won the weekend’s racing in the elite categories. It was quite spectacular. This weekend, then, the World Cup circus returns to Les Gets after a 15-year hiatus. The last time the world’s best set wheel to dirt during a top-level competition on the famous Mont Chery hillside was at the 2004 World Championships when the winner in the men’s was Fabien Barel — who was awarded the gold medal after Steve Peat crashed out in a cloud of dust on the last turn. This marked the starting point in Peat’s career as he chased the elusive World Champs title. How and when to watch the 2019 UCI MTB World Cup and World Championships So, who’s likely to win this round? War is waging for the overall lead in both the men’s and women’s races and it’s still totally up in the air about who is going to come out on top. Looking at previous form from the Crankworx events at Les Gets you might want to put money on Troy Brosnan and Rachel Atherton for the wins. Unfortunately, Rachel Atherton ruptured her Achilles tendon during Thursday’s training. This blows the women’s race wide open and it could be Marine Cabirou’s time to shine on home soil. Make sure you tune in to Red Bull TV on 12, 13 and 14 of July to watch all of the action from Les Gets — I’m certain it’s going to be an incredible weekend with some of the best racing this season has seen yet. In the tech world loads of new kit has recently been launched including bikes from Juliana and Santa Cruz, RockShox’ Reverb has been updated and BMC has gone to town producing more new bikes than you can shake a stick at, such as the Roadmachine and the XC-tech-inspired, soft tail URS gravel bike. So what delights have we got in this week’s edition of First Look Friday? Keep scrolling to find out! Manitou Mezzer Pro enduro fork The Mezzer is a good looking fork. Alex Evans Staying true to Manitou’s rear-facing arch design, the brand new Mezzer looks like a burly and capable enduro-focussed fork. Weighing 2,067g for the 180mm travel 29-inch wheeled version, it features 37mm stanchions and a Hexlock SL2 15mm axle that, Manitou claims, should help to keep the fork mega stiff. The classic rear-facing arch has been machined out to save weight Alex Evans There’s a fully-adjustable Dorado Air spring that should help you tune the ride feel along with high- and low-speed compression adjustment and low-speed rebound adjustment that are all externally tuned. The air chamber has a system called Infinite Rate Tune that lets you adjust how progressive the fork is, and how much mid-stroke support it has using a third air chamber without sacrificing small bump sensitivity. They feature both high- and low-speed compression adjustment Alex Evans The fork’s available in 27.5- and 29-inch versions and has between 140mm and 180mm of internally-adjustable travel in 10mm increments. There are also four offset options, two for each wheel size: the 650b models come in 37mm or 44mm while the 29er forks are available with 44mm or 51mm offsets. There’s external low-speed rebound adjustment and the fork uses a 15mm axle Alex Evans The fork’s black legs and chrome graphics certainly look striking and I can’t wait to bolt a set to my test bike and give them a thrashing. $999.99 Buy now direct from Manitou Red Bull Spect Fly sunglasses These Spect glasses look like they’ve been inspired by other iconic models Alex Evans Departing from its drink-focused business plan of promising to give you wings — or at least a sugar- or caffeine-fuelled buzz for 20 minutes – Red Bull is now branching out into the hard and soft goods markets. The Spect glasses are a confident attempt to mix both casual and sports-specific glasses into one package. The wire arms help to secure the glasses to your head. Alex Evans Red Bull and Spect formed their partnership back in 2016 and have now developed this range of glasses and goggles together. The Fly sunnies here feature a dual temple system that helps to secure the glasses to your head with two pre-formed wire arms that loop over the back of your ears. The wire arms are retractable into the glasses so if you’re just chilling at the pub you can slide them away — but as soon as you intend on getting rowdy on or off the bike slide them back out. You can extend or retract the wire arms at will Alex Evans The lenses are polarised and have an anti-reflection coating, so you should be able spot the fastest lines out on the bike or the quickest way to the bar. The dual temple system is available in plenty of different styles so if these Oakley Frogskin and Rayban Wayfarer inspired glasses aren’t your thing, fear not. £135 / €150 Buy now direct from Red Bull Hayes Dominion A4 hydraulic disc brakes The Dominion brake levers look smart Alex Evans Although it’s not new to Hayes’ brakes lineup, the Dominion A4 boasts a 4-piston caliper, adjustable lever reach and pad contact position and specially-designed disc rotors that claim to help reduce noise and vibrations. The Dominion is an enduro-focused brake that has been designed from the ground up to produce excellent levels of power. Hayes claims it does this by having a structurally rigid design, a Kevlar hose and a dual-port bleed system to help you get the best bleed possible. The brake lever uses cartridge bearings and the lever’s master cylinder has the smallest amount of dead stroke possible before the brake’s pistons actuate. There’s an aluminium piston with a piston glide ring to insure smooth actuation. The caliper is good looking and has some nice features Alex Evans The caliper features a system to help align it correctly with the disc called Crosshair, which uses small grub screws that you can tighten to align the brake and they use DOT 5.1 fluid which is widely available. $229.99 Buy now direct from Hayes Pro Bike Tool Torque Wrench Set There are 12 individual tools in the set and a 100mm extending bar Alex Evans Every budding mechanic aspires to build up and eventually complete their toolset, but this can come at a great monetary cost, especially if you’re wanting to fill your toolbox’s draws with Silca kit. A torque wrench is a great bit of kit to own, too. It’ll help stop you overtightening bolts, rounding heads out or stripping threads. Are cheap and good mutually exclusive? The Pro Bike Tool torque wrench set seems to indicate they aren’t. Alex Evans Enter Pro Bike Tool. Its budget-friendly torque wrench is adjustable between 2Nm and 20Nm, comes with an extension bar and 11 tool bits that include 10, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2.5 and 2mm Allen keys and Torx 10, 25 and 30 heads. The wrench uses a 1/4-inch square driver which means it’s compatible with other socket sets. The ratchet is driven using a 72-tooth cog. The torque wrench looks great. Alex Evans The set feels well made and is fairly weighty and robust, but only years of hard use will be able to show any weaknesses. I’m looking forward to spending more time with the wrench in my man cave soon. £57.99 / $59.99 Buy now direct from Pro Bike Tool BiSaddle ShapeShifter EXT Stealth saddle The carbon railed model is pretty pricey! Alex Evans Our behinds are all different shapes and sizes. That’s just a fact of life, right? BiSaddle argues that it’s going to be quite a difficult task to find a seat off the shelf that’s perfectly suited to your derriere and that’s why it’s gone to town by making an entirely adjustable saddle. The width, angle and profile of the seat are all easily altered thanks to the saddle’s split shape design. In addition, each of the saddle’s component parts are replaceable, so if you damage them or they wear out you can buy new ones. So, what’s the benefit? Well, you’ll be able to find a saddle that suits your needs perfectly and one that, if your needs change, the saddle can be adjusted to reflect those new demands. And what’s the ultimate aim? To ride in complete comfort without any numbness or soreness that can be caused by a seat. The wings are as close as they’ll go, making the saddle as narrow as possible Alex Evans The seat with its wings adjusted outwards Alex Evans The saddle might look kinda strange but we’ve been assured it’s comfy! Alex Evans Okay, so it’s a bit pricey but can or should you put a monetary value on your private bits’ happiness? $349 Buy now direct from BiSaddle

Posted by
Bike Radar
2 - 10/07/2019 23:17:35

Foxy Carbon 29 has become the benchmark for all riders looking for the best performing, more versatile and best balanced Enduro mountain bike these days. Featuring Forward Geometry and our super efficient Zero kinematics with 150 mm rear suspension and 160 mm forks, Foxy Carbon has set the new trend and has risen the bar on latest technology of suspension design and bike geometry But… (there’s always a “what if…” right?) those riders looking for the most aggressive and hardcore riding, always pushing the boundaries and looking for the gnarliest trails and bigger jumps, there is a longer travel and more capable Foxy Carbon sibling for 2020 and it’s called the SuperFoxy. Details • New mondraker superfoxy carbon 29 • Stealth air carbon technology • Mondraker 29” forward geometry • New zero 160 mm kinematics ideal for high volume air and coil shocks – Reinforced rear triangle with adjustable cs length • Full carbon monoblock trunnion upper link • Adjustable geometry: +/-1° head angle, +/-10 mm chainstay length -Shorter fork offsets • 1×12 drivetrain specific design • Hhg internal cable routing: hidden housing guide • Oversized pivot thru axles and enduro max bearings • Superboost rear hub spacing – 12×157 mm r & 15×110 mm f • New silent chainstay custom made rubber protector • Iscg05/ bb73 threaded bottom bracket/ tapered headtube/post mount rear brake caliper With the same pedaling efficiency traits Foxy Carbon is reckoned with and a newly designed Zero Suspension kinematics for a more supple beginning stroke off the top and a more progressive leverage ratio ideal for coil and big volume air shocks, the new Super Foxy features longer 160 mm rear and 170 mm front suspension travel. Super Foxy frameset sports a newly designed beefed up SuperBoost 157 x 12 mm rear triangle with a stock – and adjustable- 65° head tube angle and optional 440 or 450 mm chain stay length. You will be blown away by its torsional and laterally stiff rear triangle which makes the riding outstanding, and the bike feels super planted while being amazingly capable and active over all the rough and chattery bumpy terrain. And what about those rad looks? 170 mm FOX 36 FIT GRIP2 Factory Kashima forks with Float X2 Air on the white Super Foxy Carbon R and DHX2 Coil on the blue Super Foxy Carbon RR, beautiful one piece Monoblock Carbon rocker for these new Super Enduro beasts, be sure both Super Foxys are ready to tackle any challenge or compete for the podium at any EWS race. These two Super Foxy Carbon models also spec powerful SRAM Code brakes with 200 mm rotors front and rear, new 12-speed Shimano Deore XT on the Super Foxy R, XTR on the SuperFoxy RR with Race Face cranksets and custom DT-Swiss wheelsets paired with Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5 Wide Trail front and DHR 2.4 Wide Trail rear tires. From now on you will have no excuses to ride down that sketchy trail, to jump that gap or simply getting dropped back following your fast riding buddies. Super Foxy will improve your riding skills and will make you a faster Super Enduro rider, guaranteed. As well as our Foxy Carbon platform, Super Foxy feature Stealth Air Carbon manufacturing process, our most advanced, lightest and most exclusive carbon structure based on a more sophisticated manufacturing and internal elaboration. Its innovative organic industrial design features flowy lines and smoother edges, a very refined finish that make the new Super Foxy Carbon a true iconic model. Super Foxy Carbon benefits from improved performance thanks to market leading Forward Geometry offering a great control, superior handling, stability and confidence out on the trails. Super Foxy Carbon 29 features a slack –and adjustable- stock 65.0° head angle with 170mm FOX 36 FIT GRIP2 forks with short 44mm offsets, 160mm rear suspension travel, 440 mm or 450 mm adjustable chainstay length, long front center and reach numbers that establish a perfect balanced geometry for this Super Enduro racing rig. Forward Geometry combines longer top tubes with a shorter 30 mm stem length on both Super Foxy models on all four sizes S, M, L and XL. Super Foxy Carbon features a new optimization of the Zero system -with new kinematics specially developed for high volume air and coil shocks with a more supple beginning stroke and a more progressive leverage ratio to match the more demanding requirements of bigger jumps and overall more hardcore riding. Both Super Foxy Carbon 29 R and RR models feature FOX Float X2 and DHX2 205×65 mm metric Trunnion shocks, with custom internal configuration and settings specifically developed for the improved action of the evolved Zero Suspension System, 29 inch wheels and 160mm of rear wheel travel. This kinematic updates result in a super capable rear suspension that perfectly follows your line, tracks the terrain and eat bumps like if there’s no tomorrow. One of the main frameset features is the structurally beefed up new swingarm with SuperBoost 157×12 mm hub spacing and adjustable chainstay length. With longer 160 mm rear wheel travel and clearly tougher riding demands of its Super Enduro application, the new stiff rear triangle benefits are two-fold: making the overall riding more precise and faster. Chainstay length is adjustable either on 440 mm or 450 mm enabling the Super Foxy owner better suit the bike to his/her riding style, trails or race course. The new kinematics present on the Super Foxy Carbon feature a completely new style one-piece carbon rocker dedicated for Trunnion style metric Super Foxy shocks. Weights Super Foxy Carbon RR: 14,400kg Super Foxy Carbon R: 14,400kg Mondraker

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MTB-Mag
2 - 09/07/2019 07:01:17

Pick the best team for this round and you can walk away with a Rockshox Reverb Stealth.( Photos: 4 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
4 - 05/07/2019 17:01:22

Vallnord, Andorra. This year’s UCI MTB World Cup will go into its crucial period with four races in the next five weeks. All races will be held at altitude- Andorra, Les Gets (FRA), Val di Sole (ITA) and Lenzerheide (CH). Now with the World Cup in Andorra coming up this weekend, altitude wont be the only crucial factor, the heat is expected to play a big role as well. One person who gave it all to be ready for this block is World Champion Nino Schurter, who spent three weeks in the high alpine of Engadin, Switzerland above 2000 meters in order to perfectly adapt. Nino has had a strong start to the season by winning the Cape Epic; the World Cup races on the other hand haven’t gone according to plan with only a 6th place in Albstadt and a 2nd in Nove Mesto. The freshly crowned Swiss Champion and UCI ranked No 2 however is now fit for the battle for the top spot on the podium. Nino has good memories in Andorra- he won the World Champion title here in 2015 in addition to walking away with several World Cup wins in the Pyrenees to date. “Andorra is the toughest course from a physical point of view- your body has to deal with less oxygen up here, plus the course provides some of the steepest climbs on the circuit,” Nino says. “I want to kick-off this most important block of this season with the best possible result, and I want to win my 31st World Cup race on Sunday.“ Nino Schurter, SCOTT-SRAM Olympic & 7x World Champion With Matthieu van der Poel skipping Andorra, Nino expects Italian Gerhard Kerschbaumer to be one of the main contenders for the win. Kerschbaumer won the race last year, and he won the Swiss Cup in Andermatt this past weekend (Nino didn’t race this one). “I want to kick-off this most important block of this season with the best possible result, and I want to win my 31st World Cup race on Sunday.” Nino leaves no doubts about his ambitions. The Spark RC 900 WC N1NO Frame Kit All SCOTT-SRAM athletes will be riding a Limited Edition bike, the Spark RC 900 World Cup N1NO frame kit, in Andorra. The frame kit from SCOTT’s 2020 collection will be available in shops from end of July. The Spark RC 900 WC N1NO HMX frame kit comes with a RockShox SID Ultimate. The fork is paired with a custom RockShox Nude 3-mode rear shock. SCOTT’s proprietary TwinLoc system allows riders to control a bike’s suspension performance and geometry simultaneously. Specs: FRAME: HMX Carbon Frame, 1 by only FORK: RockShox SID Ultimate RLC3 Air – Custom Charger 3-Modes Damper with low Speed Adj. – 15x110mm Maxle Stealth / Tapered steerer / Lockout / Reb. Adj. TRAVEL: Lockout – 70 – 100mm REAR SHOCK: RockShox NUDE RLC3 Trunnion – SCOTT custom w. travel / geo adj. – 3 MODES: Lockout-Traction Control-Descend – low Speed Ad.j / Reb. Adj. ACCESSORIES: SRAM XX1 Custom Crankset SRAM Level Ultimate Custom Brakes TwinLoc Remote Control Shifter Kit, Syncros Pro Drop in Headset Syncros Fraser iC Handlebar Syncros rear axle APPROX. FRAME WEIGHT (size M): 1849 g | 4.08 Lbs (incl. shock) Sizes: S, M, L, XL

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MTB-Mag