4 - 28/03/2019 13:17:21

Ready for the hunt? YT, one of the world’s hottest mountain bike brands, is entering the eMTB segment, and they’ve brought out the big guns in the hunt for the top spot: with potent numbers and clever detailed solutions, the brand new YT DECOY promises a whole new level of electronically-assisted endorphin binges. We were in the south of France to test ride the new YT DECOY. South of France, March 2019. Rumours about YT’s first eMTB have been going around for some time. Accordingly, we were very curious to see what one of the most popular mountain bike brands currently around would conjure up for the eMTB sector. We already knew before the official presentation in southern France that YT would rely on a Shimano STEPS motor: so a bike like any other Shimano eMTB? Far from it – as we quickly realised in the presentation given by CEO Markus Flossmann and CTO Stefan Willared. YT DECOY CF Pro Race | Shimano STEPS E8000 | 540 Wh custom battery | 160/165 mm (f/r) | 29”/27,5” (f/r) | 22.3 kg (in size L) | € 6,599 googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); In contrast to brands such as Haibike, Husqvarna or Greyp Bikes, with the new DECOY, YT deliberately aimed to create an eMTB that looks and rides like a regular mountain bike. Meaning: maximum integration and minimal evidence that it’s an ebike. The YT DECOY, according to chief developer Stefan Willared, is meant to “be a true YT”: fast, with extremely potent, downhill orientated handling. And of course, the look and feel of the design should also speak for itself: look, I’m hot, I’m a YT. To achieve that, the German brand reached deep into their bag of tricks and went at it very professionally, coming up with a lot of clever solutions in developing the YT DECOY: the electrified version of the YT CAPRA. The YT DECOY’s namesake: A duck as a decoy…let the hunt begin! Even before the official release, the brand new YT DECOY eMTB has been through a lot: chasing through Scottish woodland with the movie star Vinnie Jones, the first eMTB double backflip, and a name that might be a little confusing at first: what’s the YT DECOY got to do with an actual decoy? Watch the video to find out: .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } The YT DECOY in detail: custom YT battery and other highlights The YT DECOY features a carbon frame, fitted with a Shimano STEPS E8000 motor, and an E7000 display and remote on the handlebar. The motor is fed by a removable 540 Wh battery, specifically developed for YT by SIMPLO, one of the biggest battery manufacturers that also produce for Apple. With 160 mm travel at the front and 165 mm at the rear and mixed wheel sizes – 29″ front, 27.5″ rear – the key data of the YT DECOY sounds like it promises to be a monster on the trails. Before we get to the first ride review, let us take a look at the technical details and features of the DECOY. Balanced proportions: YT has designed the proportions of the carbon frame in such a way that the oversized downtube doesn’t immediately stand out. Everything in the design that could point to this being an eMTB is deliberately dialled down and hidden, the entire frame is oversized to help the large downtube, which contains the battery, inconspicuously blend in with the rest of the bike. YT’s custom 540 Wh battery is kept in place with two Allan bolts, while an elastomer on the lower mount helps isolate the battery from shocks and vibrations. One of the recurring problems we’ve encountered on many eMTBs is the battery coming loose and rattling, which YT has tried to solve with the elastomer. Besides being beautifully and neatly integrated into the downtube, YT tried to keep the centre of gravity as low as possible. Although the battery is 460 mm long, about 140 mm longer than current Shimano or Bosch external batteries (albeit with 40 Wh more capacity) it has a height of only 65 mm (including the cover) keeping it 25 mm lower than said external batteries. According to Stefan Willared, every centimetre drop in the height of the battery makes a noticeable difference in the bike’s handling. You’ll have to take the increased length into account if you’re considering carrying a spare in your backpack for long rides. The complete dimensions of the battery are as follows: 460 mm x 65 mm x 80 mm, and it weighs 3.17 kg. The 540 Wh battery is the same for all five frame sizes (S, M, L, XL, XXL). Beyond that, YT is planning to release a 700 Wh battery, which will also fit into DECOY. As soon as it becomes available, the bigger battery is said to be offered to all existing DECOY owners at a discounted price. Due to patent issues, YT couldn’t implement a quick-release system, but once you’ve gotten used to it, removing the two bolts to get to the battery is quick and easy. YT decided against the option of a lock for the battery. The ON switch of the bike is hidden on the underside of the top tube, while still being easily accessible. The haptic is nice! The charging port for the battery is covered by a rubber plug on the underside of the downtube Typical ebike cockpit: all the cables need to be properly fastened and tidied up. An easily accessible channel for the cables on the inside of the downtube is supposed to keep everything quiet and facilitate easy servicing, which is particularly important for a direct-to-consumer brand! Thanks to the cable duct, fitting a Lupine SL F e-bike lamp should be very easy. The StVZO-compliant (German road traffic regulations) headlight will be directly available from YT in the near future. With a sensor regulated daytime light, a glare-free 900 Lumen night light, and 1100 Lumen high-beam, it’s definitely an option we can recommend! The cable inlets are fitted with rubber lugs. Unfortunately, they came loose on our test bike and didn’t stay put. According to YT, the production model won’t have this issue. The special aluminium derailleur hanger covers a large portion of the dropout to protect the carbon frame in case of chainsuck To further quieten the bike on the trail, the chainstay protector on the drive side features special knobs to reduce the noise of the chain slapping Safe and hidden: the sensor of the motor is hidden in the rear linkage and the magnet is integrated into the brake rotor. Losing spoke magnets is a thing of the past. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); The kinematics of the rear end have been adapted to the unique aspects of the electric motor in the YT DECOY. Compared to the pure muscle power driving a non-motorised mountain bike, the electric motor provides a much more constant flow of power. Pedal kickback has been reduced by about 30% compared to the CAPRA 29, as it is an unwanted counterforce to the motor. The ACROS AZX-260 headset has an integral stopper to prevent the fork crown from contacting the down tube, especially on the smaller frame sizes. Unfortunately, it’s not yet available, but YT has plans for a 500 ml bottle that will fit into the front triangle. YT DECOY: geometry and sizes The YT DECOY is available in five frame sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL. In terms of geometry, the YT DECOY is based on the YT CAPRA 29. Overall, however, the DECOY is a bit more upright and more compact than the CAPRA 29, meaning the reach in size L is 10 mm shorter (455mm) than the CAPRA. Noteworthy is the almost 10 mm lower bottom bracket of the YT DECOY compared to the CAPRA 29: on the one hand, this is because the DECOY has 5 mm less travel at the rear, and on the other hand, because the short 165 mm cranks offer more ground clearance! Size S M L XL XXL Seat tube 400 mm 420 mm 445 mm 470 mm 495 mm Top tube 568 mm 589 mm 611 mm 634 mm 657 mm Head tube 95 mm 100 mm 105 mm 115 mm 125 mm Head angle 65°/65.5° 65°/65.5° 65°/65.5° 65°/65.5° 65°/65.5° Seat angle 76°/76.5° 76°/76.5° 76°/76.5° 76°/76.5° 76°/76.5° Chainstay 442 mm 442 mm 442 mm 442 mm 442 mm BB height 36/20 mm 36/20 mm 36/20 mm 36/20 mm 36/20 mm Wheelbase 1,178 mm 1,200 mm 1,222 mm 1,247 mm 1,271 mm Reach 415 mm 435 mm 455 mm 475 mm 495 mm Stack 620 mm 625 mm 629 mm 638 mm 647 mm The geometry of the YT DECOY can be adjusted via a flip chip in the shock mount: the seat tube and head angles vary by 0.5° (76°/76.5° seat tube angle, 65°/65.5° head angle), the bottom bracket height by 7 mm (340 mm/347 mm). At 442 mm, the chainstays are not particularly short, and it’s meant to be that way! According to chief developer Stefan Willared, the goal is not to make the shortest possible chainstays, but to achieve a good balance between agility, composure and climbing prowess. A unique aspect with YT is that most riders can choose between at least two frame sizes due to the low standover height. If you like your bike to be agile and prefer a much more upright sitting position, you’re better off reaching for the smaller size, for maximum composure, go for the larger frame size. For our 178 cm tall test rider we went for the size L YT DECOY. We also tried the bike in size medium for a short while, which had a significantly more compact and upright sitting position and was more agile on the trail, but at the cost of composure and high-speed stability on the fast and technical singletrack around Nice. Der Beitrag First Ride Review: YT DECOY – the new Specialized Levo Killer? erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
4pts
13/02/2019
2pts
10/02/2019
2 - 25/01/2019 13:17:19

POC is synonymous in our circles with images of Scandi-style cycling kit and helmets. Almost no one would associate it with Maui, Volvo Cars or emancipation. We headed to POC’s HQ in Stockholm to find out exactly what links these terms as inextricably as meatballs and lingonberry jam. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The fact that ‘POC is a Swedish company’ is a phrase that was repeated multiple times during my visit. But what does that actually mean? If I’m honest, my previous understanding of ‘Swedishness’ amounted to the contents of this video. Unlike in Germany, the topic of emancipation and equal rights doesn’t even feature in Sweden. Not to have them is positively barbarian and an archaic concept that’s banished to the history books. Stood by the coffee machine, I’m listening to a handful of POC employees chat about everything from how their partner’s paternity leave is going to whether they should mountain bike or road ride after work. I note that there are remarkably few people in the POC office on this particular day, and assume that this is what flexible working hours and family-oriented work schedules look like. I’m right. As I walk down a hallway with my coffee I bump into a tall man, laden down with a tin of paint and a ladder, who greets me warmly: “Hi, I’m Jan Woxing, co-founder and creative director. It’s great to have you here.” So casual, without any hint of pretence. Could there be any more textbook-worthy hints to Sweden’s identity? POC is a Swedish company with a strong mission to do the best we can to save lives and to reduce the consequences of accidents for gravity sports athletes and cyclists. From Swedish ski expertise to international big hitter POC was founded in 2005 by Stefan Ytterborn with its focus predominantly fixed on the ski racing market. The accumulated know-how from winter-based gravity sports eventually found its way over to mountain biking, and the company launched an initial off-road collection. For POC, this was a logical step as it was able to borrow technology from its proprietary production methods to create products that would appeal to a partially overlapping market. In 2012, the specialist outdoor brand Black Diamond bought POC and adopted a strategic direction towards road riding. Two years later POC partnered up with Swedish car brand Volvo in order to jointly explore innovative safety solutions. In 2015 POC was sold to Investcorp, a global investment company. These days POC is spread across 25 countries, with more than 100 employees around the world. The laidback HQ in Sweden counts just 35 smart brains on its books, which makes it feel a long way removed from big business and corporate strategies. Speaking of history and evolution processes, Sweden has awarded the Nobel Peace Prize annually since 1901, hasn’t been active in active combat for 200 years, and it was only in 2009 that Swedish became its official recognised main language. #randomknowledge How does POC define safety? The Swedes’ ambitions go beyond simply ensuring the greatest protection in the moment of impact. It’s also about accident prevention and those potentially life-saving moments after the crash. A three-pronged approach, if you like. Look at POC’s product line-up and you’ll see that it attempts to tackle at least one element, if not all three. The AVIP series, which stands for Attention, Visibility, Interaction, Protection, utilizes specific bright colours to enhance visibility while training – with the added goal of prompting drivers to not only spot the rider, but also recognise that he or she is a cyclist. Visibility alone isn’t sufficient. When it comes to crashing, POC deploys various systems, including the well-documented SPIN technology in its helmets and printed ceramic particles in strategic locations on its jerseys to limit road rash and grazes from rough surfaces – much like motorbike riders wear leather. Right now POC is considering all options to integrate alarm systems or even crash sensors into their helmets. It’s more than just hitting your head. Design for safety In the conceptual phase of all its products, POC starts from the idea of ‘maximum safety.’ It’s something that it won’t compromise on, and claims that the design and all further aspects are subordinate to this idea. But that’s not to say that it doesn’t place a huge emphasis on aesthetics too – in fact, it’s POC’s distinctive design language that has garnered it so many fans. A good design should do more than just be easy on the eye; the more comfortable you feel wearing a helmet, the more you’ll understand that it’s a valuable piece of equipment rather than just a necessary evil to be worn on the bike. Research and Development Considering the size of the company and its available resources, it’s surprising just how heavily POC invests in research. The Stockholm location for the HQ is an inspired one, I learn, putting the brand in close contact with specialists from the worlds of automobiles, sports medicine and neurology. Like most of its competitors, POC’s production takes place in the Far East, and it’s just research, development and administration that’s housed in the Stockholm HQ. There are also two ‘labs’ here: the POC Lab, which investigates the most up-to-date neurological and spinal research; and the POC WATTS Lab that explores aerodynamics. It goes without saying that certain helmets and apparel shouldn’t just provide the ultimate safety for the athlete, but also make them faster – especially for the road side of things this is a mayor topic. Then there’s the brand’s current collaboration with the Swedish car manufacturer Volvo. This particular project takes the name POC AID, seeing the two companies jointly develop intelligent products that will integrate digital technologies in order to prevent accidents. POC’s aim here is that the cyclist will soon become part of vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication protocols – it’s definitely exciting to see this progress! Volvo and POC have also jointly developed a test protocol that analyses the injuries to a cyclist of a crash into the A, B or C pillars of a car. It was surprising to hear that this move by Volvo Cars and POC was a first in the industry, and that such test procedures didn’t already exist as standard for helmet manufacturers. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); But as technical and abstract as all this product development sounds, it’s all implemented into the product range in a very accessible manner. Fredrik Hallander, development and engineering expert, stands watchfully over an armada of sewing machines and clay moulders that bring the CFD simulations to life. As Fredrik guides me through the prototype workshop he tells me about developing the POC Octal helmet and how he put the final touches on the design while sat on a beach in Maui. That flexible approach to work locations and hours clearly pays off, I think to myself, and he agrees. “A 13-hour day on Maui is pretty long, too.” he adds. I like this guy, and that feeling grows when he shows me a photo of a kitchen and chairs that he designed and built in his free time. Charles Eames and Walter Knoll eat your heart out. Oh yeah, and Fredrik isn’t just a surfer, he’s also a damn good cyclist. Back to the airport from the workshop, I was exhilarated at all the new faces I’d met, impressed by the insider look I’d had at POC’s day-to-day business, and excited about Stockholm’s beautiful trails. I opened my notebox and scribbled inside it. It read: POC is a brand that wants to make the future zero-carbon-society faster and above all safer. Innovative products emerge from a flexible environment with a timeless, Scandinavian design. And there’s a chair-building surfer dude with five sewing machines who works there. POC is such a Swedish company. Tack så mycket, POC! For more info head to: pocsports.com This article is from ENDURO issue #036ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine is published in a digital app format in both English and German. Download the app for iOS or Android to read all articles on your tablet or smartphone. 100% free! The post Visiting POC – Where Swedish traditions meet achingly modern R&D appeared first on ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine.

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
4 - 22/01/2019 11:17:16

TQ – a cryptic acronym that stands for something downright simple: Technology in Quality. The Bavarian brand has already sent their eponymous principle into space (quite literally), and are now pursuing the ambition to become a major player on the e-bike scene. Having paid a visit to TQ, we can testify that there’s a whole lot more to this brand than just their powerful motor. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Up until now, most e-mountain bikers may only have heard the name TQ in passing. Their incredibly powerful motor has spread the name TQ in certain circles, but most riders won’t yet have had the opportunity to try it out. Having created such a stir, we wondered what exactly is behind TQ and where did they get such know-how? For those who are expecting your standard motor manufacturing company, think again. TQ has a far broader focus on technology, including electronic control systems for passenger planes and components for medical robots. If you needed any more convincing, the Bavarian company’s motors are often sent into space. If that isn’t high flying, we don’t know what is. The company is broadly positioned and now aim to channel their extensive knowledge into the eMTB sector. The most recent piece of evidence is the all-new Haibike FLYON bike, which utilizes a legion of TQ technology. But how did TQ even get this far into the world of e-bikes? The TQ Group’s story first began in 1994, when Detlef Schneider and Rüdiger Stahl set out making circuit boards in a small room in postcard-perfect Upper Bavaria’s Gut Delling. Circuit boards are those green things in every computer; that thing that most humans wouldn’t even know its top from its bottom. TQ still make these today, although there are now 1,600 members of staff (not just two), and they’re spread across 13 locations. Both of the founders are still active in managerial roles now, with Detlef Schneider’s son Stefan working alongside them. One of the TQ’s biggest strengths has always been their ability to recognise potential – really early on, whether this applies to acquiring new locations or breaking into new lines of business. Back in 2008, they essentially ‘fell into’ the e-bike world with the chance development of their own e-bike motor. Back then, they had a part-time developer on their books – a certain Toni Rossberger, who is a motocross stuntman and appeared regularly on national television with stunts including daredevil ski jumping on his bike. Toni was contacted by the start-up Clean Mobile, who wanted his assistance in creating a powerful drive unit for e-bikes. TQ were keen, firstly sharing their development know-how and then injecting the necessary capital when the start-up went bust. They eventually bought Clean Mobile, including all of the patents and most of the employees. As a result, TQ also got their hands on an e-bike motor – which, interestingly, they’d largely developed anyway. What’s special about the HPR 120S motor is its enormous power with 120 Nm of constant torque and its compact size. Having so much performance in a package that takes up so little space isn’t standard fare for e-bikes and it was achieved through Toni Rossberger’s pin ring transmission design. For TQ, the concept of compactly packaged, high-efficiency design is something of their hallmark – especially in robotics, and it’s the approach that retains their standing as a high-end company focusing on quality over quantity.   Since the HPR 120S motor entered the market in 2012, it has kept a relatively low profile – something that TQ actively wanted. The Bavarians deliberately opted for a low-key entrance rather than hammer the motor onto the market, as this gave them the flexibility to monitor its quality and step in should any teething problems occur. As a result, the motor has so far only been used on bikes from M1 Sporttechnik, and when it does go mainstream and up its production numbers, TQ can be confident that there won’t be any unwelcome surprises. Yet the motor is just one part of a system that TQ has developed. Like in other industries, the brand takes on the role of being a development partner too. The eMTB segment has existed with two types of motor suppliers: those offering a completely closed system that doesn’t allow any freedom to the bike brands to customise the system; or those that are completely open allowing the bike brand to configure everything from the display to the motor or the battery. The downside to these systems is the confusion when something goes wrong: just who is responsible? With such haziness, the customer is usually left waiting with an indeterminate time for repairs or replacement parts.   The company is working collaboratively on a robot known as Franka Emika, which has already won the German Future Prize, as well as money counting machines for banks, and ticket machines for train stations. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); This is where TQ cover all the bases by working closely in their partnerships, ensuring joint development, production, assembly and – ultimately – accepting responsibility. Right now, the company is working collaboratively on a robot known as Franka Emika, which has already won the German Future Prize, as well as money counting machines for banks, and ticket machines for train stations. For the bike industry, TQ will do the same: from the display to the controls, from the battery management system to the motor, TQ will develop, produce and supply the parts. When the company is aware of a gap in its know-how, they know exactly where to turn, seeking out reliable partners – each time, knowing that the liability will always fall on their shoulders. Most recently they outsourced support for the development of their own app. The Haibike FLYON models represent the first bikes sporting TQ’s know-how, and it’s the first chance for the public to really try the system out. These bikes, however, are engineered to be more than just a frame with a powerful motor. With input from TQ, Haibike have revised their approach to integration, design and usability and the Flyon range represents the fruits of that labour. At EUROBIKE the sight of these models caused a stir, prompting other bike brands to reach out to TQ in the hope of future collaborations. Naturally, such a positive reception could have resulted in a huge number of orders for TQ, but they take a more conservative approach, only accepting projects that they are confident can be successfully carried out. For the Bavarian-based team, it’s the Technology and the Quality that truly count. Der Beitrag Exactly what it says on the tin – How TQ plan to take the e-bike world by storm erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
2pts
11/11/2018
2 - 22/08/2018 18:51:18

As much as the e-bike market continues to grow with new pedal-assist bikes, it looks like the e-moto world is expanding as well. The newest name in the realm is the Cake Kalk, an e-moto entry designed by Stefan Ytterborn, the Swedish product designer already famous for creating the POC line of helmets and soft goods. The aluminum-framed Cake is said to weigh 150 pounds with a range of up to 50 miles for a single charge using an IPM motor. Built for “light” (whatever that means) off-road use, the first batch of 50 limited-edition models (at a price of $17,000) was sold out, with production models slated for delivery in late 2018. www.ridecake.com THERE ARE SO MANY WAYS TO GET ELECTRIC BIKE ACTION In print, from the Apple newsstand, or on your Android device, from Google. Available from the Apple Newsstand for reading on your iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch. Subscribe Here For more subscription information contact (800) 767-0345 Got something on your mind? Let us know at hi-torque.com ____________________________________ The post Taking The Cake appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
2pts
10/08/2018
2pts
10/08/2018
2 - 04/08/2018 07:17:14

We sit down with BMC's head of mountain bike development to talk about the challenges of making carbon bikes in Switzerland, taking risks and why 27.5 wheels should never have been a thing.( Photos: 14, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike