12 - 21/02/2020 10:00:57

The UK may have been under siege from Storm Ciara and Storm Dennis this past week, but as always the team here at BikeRadar has steadfastly soldiered on in the face of great adversity to bring you all the best news and reviews on the latest cycling tech. As Uncle Ben said to Peter Parker, “With great power, comes great responsibility”, and we wouldn’t want to let our readers down. Just in case you’ve been unable to reach us at any point over the past week, here’s a quick rundown of a few highlights from our site that you might have missed. The venerable Matthew Loveridge published his review of Canyon’s Grail CF SL 7.0 (the gravel bike with the funky double-decker handlebar), while Luke Marshall gave us his expert opinion on the GT Force 29 Expert, GT’s race-proven enduro machine now with 29in wheels, and Warren Rossiter introduced his long-term review of his GT Grade Carbon gravel bike. Beyond reviews, we’ve pondered if the argument about disc brakes has now been settled with pure climbers winning on disc brake bikes, brought you a buyer’s guide to our favourite cheap kids’ bikes and taken a look at five products that prove carbon isn’t always best. With all of that out of the way, let’s jump straight into our weekly roundup of the best stuff to arrive at BikeRadar HQ this week. Ere Research Genus SL 30 wheels and Genus CC Skinwall tyres Ere Research designs its wheels and tyres to work as a system. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media There are few things we like better than a set of bling carbon road wheels and these latest hoops from Dutch brand Ere Research tick plenty of the right boxes on paper. Its SL30 wheels have 30mm deep, tubeless-ready carbon rims (45mm and 60mm rim depths, plus a full carbon rear disc wheel are also available), laced to Ere’s own hubs with 24 bladed spokes front and rear. The Genus SL30 wheels have 30mm deep carbon rims. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media Ere Research builds its wheels on its own hubs. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media The wheelset also came in a padded wheel bag. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media The rims have a 19mm internal, on trend for road wheels, but the 28mm external width is more notable. That’s similar to Zipp’s NSW wheels, which are renowned for their wide rims. Designed primarily as wheels for fast road riding, Ere says they will also play nice with tyres up to 36mm, so gravel and cyclocross are options with these too, if that’s more your cup of tea. Ere Research’s Genus CC Skinwall clincher tyres have lovely looking 320 TPI cotton sidewalls. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media Ere has also supplied a set of its Genus CC Skinwall clincher tyres, which certainly look the part with their 320 TPI tan walls. Notably, Ere claims that designing its own tyres enables it to ensure its wheel, rim and tyre designs work together in such a manner that they are “close to the ideal aerodynamic shape” when used in conjunction with one another. Ere claims the SL30 wheels and Genus CC tyres weigh 1,460g (+/- 2 per cent) and 325g respectively. Set up with inner tubes, the supplied set of wheels and tyres weighs 2,290g on our scales, which leaves about 360g (which is quite a lot) for the inner tubes if those claimed weights are correct, although we’re only quibbling about a few grams in reality. Ere Research Genus SL30 wheels: €1,399 Ere Research Genus CC Skinwall clincher tyres: €65 Buy Ere Research Genus SL30 wheelset from Ere Research Buy Ere Research Genus CC Skinwall tyres from Ere Research 100% Racetrap sunglasses Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); 100%’s latest Racetrap sunglasses. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media Best known for gracing the faces of stars such as Peter Sagan and Mathieu van der Poel, 100%’s latest version of its Racetrap sunglasses claim to feature an “even larger field of vision and an enhanced fit”. We’ve got the wonderfully named Soft Tact Banana colourway, but if that isn’t to your taste they’re also available in Soft Tact Black, Gloss Black and Matte White. 100% supplies a clear lens, microfibre bag and a spare nosepiece too. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media 100% says the interchangeable polycarbonate lens is shatterproof, impact resistant, is hydro and oleophobic and provides 100 per cent UV protection (UV400). Usefully, a clear lens option is also included in the box for days when the sun isn’t shining so brightly. £159 Buy 100% Racetrap sunglasses from Sigma Sports for £124 Latest deals The Protein Works Vegan Wondershake Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); The Vegan Wondershake from The Protein Works claims to taste much better than other vegan protein shakes on the market. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media Veganuary might be over, but if you’ve decided to carry on with a plant based diet (or even if you were already living on one) The Protein Works thinks it may have solved a particular problem that it claims plagues vegan sports nutrition. The Vegan Wondershake is said to banish the “grainy, earthy and overly thick” vegan protein shakes of the past and instead be “indistinguishable from a whey protein shake” (which use whey protein from cow’s milk and are therefore not vegan). There are three different flavours available. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media The shake is available in three different flavours (Double Chocolate, Salted Caramel and Strawberries and Cream), and a 30g serving is said to provide 21g of plant based protein, made from a mix of pea, soy, hemp and rice proteins. Admittedly, most of us here at BikeRadar probably don’t do enough training to benefit from a protein shake (because we’re too busy producing riveting content like this!), but if you’re the kind of cyclist that’s looking for a vegan option to get swol then this could be just the ticket. £37.99 Latest deals Aftershokz Aeropex wireless bone conduction headphones Buy now from {merchant} ({price}), {merchant} ({price}) and {merchant} ({price})."> (function () { var s = document.createElement('script'); s.type = 'text/javascript'; s.async = true; s.src = "//knl.mntzr11.net/widget/intext/app.bundle.js"; s.onload = function () { new inText({ domain: "knl.mntzr11.net", shopId: 608, geolocation: true, }); }; var x = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; x.parentNode.insertBefore(s, x); //trim whitespace from li to flag empty items (twig seems to strip out closing if you remove the space..... [].forEach.call(document.querySelectorAll('.monetizer-in-text-link'), function(textLink) { textLink.innerHTML = textLink.innerHTML.trim(); }); })(); Aftershokz Aeropex headphones use bone conduction technology to transmit sound. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media If you ride on your own a lot, it can be really tempting to pop in some headphones and listen to music or a podcast. Unfortunately, this generally comes with the drawback of significantly reducing your ability to hear traffic and everything else going on around you – and compromising on safety is never a good idea. Unlike normal headphones, Aftershokz headphones leave your ears open to ambient sounds. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media Aftershokz’ wireless bone conduction headphones potentially offer a solution, though. They bypass your auditory canal and eardrum and instead use vibrations to conduct sound through your cheekbones to your cochlea, leaving your ears open to take in ambient sounds. Despite their name, the Aeropex headphones don’t make any claims about aerodynamics, but the bone conduction technology has apparently been redesigned, which is said to improve sound quality and make these 30 per cent smaller and 13 per cent lighter than the previous model. Aftershokz supplies two magnetic charging cables, ear buds and a storage pouch with the Aeropex headphones. Simon Bromley / Immediate Media They also promise eight hours of battery life and IP67 standard waterproofing (which means they ought to be able to withstand being dropped in water up to a metre deep for half an hour). This model even made Warren Rossiter’s gear of the year 2019, so we’re hoping to be similarly impressed when we get a chance to put them to the test. £149.95 Latest deals

Posted by
Bike Radar
14 - 21/02/2020 04:00:56

Hullo all you Flow Frothers, and welcome to the first edition of Flow’s Fresh Produce for the year 2020! Consider this a slightly belated Happy New Year from Mick & Wil here at FlowMTB, and we hope you all had a marvellous break over the Xmas holidays! For those of you enjoying your summer riding trips, we’d really rather not know. But we still hope you’re enjoying yourselves. Happy (belated) New Year from Mick & Wil! Please don’t judge – we’re athletes after all. Yes, we’re just a little tardy with our New Years wishes, but has anyone else noticed just how massive the start of 2020 has been so far? Because it’s been humongous! If you’ve been following us here at FlowMTB, you’ll no doubt have seen all of the new bikes released over the past couple of weeks, in what is traditionally the ‘off-season’ for all the big brand launches. After the last few weeks though, we’re not convinced there’s actually an off-season anymore. Not when we’ve had Specialized launch its new Levo SL lightweight e-MTB, or Pivot Cycles bring out its second generation Switchblade. Of course you’ll no doubt be aware that Santa Cruz has also finally decided to jump into the e-MTB game with the amusingly-named Heckler, which has caused quite the stir. And just this week Norco decided to unveil the brand new Sight VLT, which is very, very different to the previous version. We’ve had the chance to ride and rate all four of those bikes, so be sure to check out the reviews right here if you fancy. Wil testing out the impressively lightweight Levo SL from Specialized. Mick piloting the zingy Santa Cruz Heckler – the brand’s first e-MTB. Beyond all the bombshell bike releases, there’s been scads of other stories and reviews we’ve been busy beavering away on in the New Year, including Mick’s colourful feature on all the bikes & tech from the Cannonball MTB Festival. And if you’re looking for any inspiration for a riding trip this year, be sure to read Imogen’s Top-5 reasons for mountain biking in Alice Springs – some lovely photos and inspirational words in there to get you yearning for some outback adventures. Now that we’ve gotten through some of those early bike launches, we’ve had a moment to breathe and go through all of the new kit that’s turned up at Flow HQ for testing. And there is A LOT! So grab a cuppa, settle in, and get ready for a heady dose of shiny new kit. As always, give us a hoy if you’ve got any questions about any of the products you see here. Enjoy! Fox Speedframe Helmet Fox has completely overhauled its trail lid, which is now called the Speedframe. Drawing from the Dropframe, the Speedframe is an open-face trail helmet with loads of rear coverage and a clever dual-density EPS shell. The Fox Flux is dead! Long live the Flux! In its place, Fox has introduced a brand new trail helmet called the Speedframe. We like the new name, which helps to better align it with the full-face Proframe and the half-face Dropframe. The Speedframe maintains an open-face shell and is designed with trail riding in mind. There are 19 vents in total, including three vents over the brow, which kind of gives it a slightly ‘Specialized’ vibe. There’s a big ol’ visor that offers three firmly-indexed positions. Set it in the highest position, and you can stow your goggles up there too. Inside the helmet you’ll find the latest version of the MIPS protection system, as well as anti-microbial padding that can be removed and washed if your microbes are simply too powerful. Fox offers the Speedframe in two versions. We’ve got the more expensive ‘Pro’ model, which gets a snazzy FidLock chin buckle that uses the wizardry of magnets to bring it together. More importantly though, the Speedframe Pro gets the Varizorb shell, which combines two different densities of EPS foam into the one shell. You can spot this in the photo above – the light grey EPS foam is a softer density and is placed closer to the rider’s head, while the black EPS foam is a firmer density and is placed on the outer part of the structure for better impact strength. For $70 less, you can get the standard Speedframe helmet, which comes with the same overall shape and MIPS protection system. However, the standard Speedframe does miss out on the dual-density Varizorb foam though, and it also skips the FidLock buckle. Both helmets come in a tonne of colour options and in Small, Medium or Large sizes. From: PSI Cycling Price: $269.99 Ride Concepts Transition Clip Shoes Ride Concepts is still a relatively new name in the mountain bike footwear world, but the fledgling brand is having a red-hot crack at the big hitters with a solid line of both flat pedal and clip pedal shoes. The Transition is RC’s flagship clip pedal shoe designed for trail riding and enduro racing. You get laces and a big Velcro strap to tie it all down, while D3O inserts in the footbed and around the ankle provide impact protection. The 40mm wide cleat box is designed to accept all modern 2-bolt mountain bike cleat systems, and it’s surrounded by a textured rubber outsole that uses RC’s mid-density DST 8.0 compound. From: Lusty Industries Price: $274.95 Dynaplug Racer Tubeless Tyre Repair Kit For repairing a tubeless tyre puncture on the trail, we’ve found it hard to go past the quality and effectiveness of a Dynaplug. The US brand makes a host of different solutions for plugging a hole in your tyre, including the lightweight Racer option we have here. This double-ended tool is beautifully machined from solid billet 6061 aluminium and weighs just 23 grams. It’s slim enough to fit in a saddle bag, jersey pocket, or with your tube strap on the frame. You get three of the pointy-tip plugs and two blunt Megaplugs included. From: KWT Imports Price: $64.95 Dynaplug Megapill Tubeless Tyre Repair Kit Compared to the original Dynaplug Pill, the Megapill is, err, more mega? It’s bigger, that’s right. And it holds more plugs too. And it comes with a Megaplug in it – that’s the thicker tubeless plug that has blunt, rounded tip for sealing up particularly large punctures. Also inside the Megapill is the world’s tiniest shank for cutting off the rubber tail that’s left behind after you’ve done your plugging. And all of that comes inside a texturally-pleasing machined alloy case. From: KWT Imports Price: $99.95 Dynaplug Megaplugger Tubeless Tyre Repair Kit If you’re not so fussed on carrying a zillion plugs or you don’t need the fancy alloy case, the Megaplugger uses a lighter plastic housing. As its name suggests, it comes with the bigger Megaplug applicator, along with a couple of spare plugs in the box. Plus the cutest little yellow pipe-cleaner. Spare plugs can be bought separately in a 5-pack for $19.95 (pointed or bullet-tipped), and you can get a 3-pack of the XL-sized Megaplugs for $22.95. From: KWT Imports Price: $59.95 DHaRCO Tech Tee DHaRCO has a fresh season of riding apparel for 2020, including some snazzy new Tech Tees. Aussie mountain bike apparel brand, DHaRCO, has got a new season line of riding jerseys, tech tees, baggy shorts, and gloves. We’ve got one of the new stone-coloured tech tees, which are made from a fabric called Drirelease. Made up of 85% polyester and 15% cotton, Drirelease aims to provide the softer feel of cotton while better wicking moisture for vastly better breathability. You can get these tech tees from Small through to XXL and in a bunch of colour options. From: DHaRco Price: $59.95 DHaRCO Gravity Shorts To go with the new jerseys and tech tees, DHaRCO has revamped its Gravity Shorts with a new cut that supposedly fits truer to size than the previous version, which was known for being on the small side. Using a 4-way stretch fabric, the Gravity Shorts get a couple of zippered pockets and an adjustable waist with a Velcro cinch-strap on each side. Available in Small through to XXL in Black, Blue and the Camo we have here. From: DHaRco Price: $125.00 DHaRCO Connor Gloves We dig the jazzy patterns of DHaRCO’s full-finger gloves, including the flowery print on these Connor gloves. These have a streamlined fit and a minimalist construction for comfort and summer riding breathability. The synthetic palm is free of padding for a close fit on the grips, and the the thumb and index finger are supposedly smart-phone friendly. There are four other colour options, and all gloves come in Small through to XL sizes. From: DHaRco Price: $36.50 DHaRCO 3/4 Sleeve Jersey You too can look like Connor Fearon. Standing still anyway. Inspired by Connor Fearon’s race kit, the Fast Tropical print on this 3/4 jersey is an obvious match for those dazzling gloves. With an over-the-elbow length, the 3/4 jersey offers a touch more abrasion and sun protection than a regular short-sleeve jersey, but keeps things light and breezy. Quick-dry polyester helps there too, as do the side mesh panels, which are kept black for tasteful discretion. Like the Tech Tee, this bad boy goes up to a XXL size. From: DHaRco Price: $69.95 DHaRCO Gravity Pants An entirely new product for 2020, the DHaRCO Gravity Pants were designed in collaboration with Connor Fearon to provide full-length protection while still maintaining a close-fit for less flapping in the breeze. Not just for DH racing, these Gravity Pants are built light and stretchy enough for winter trail riding. These get the same 4-way stretch fabric as the Gravity Shorts, but that fabric runs all the way down to the ankles, where they taper in above your shoes. There’s room for knee pads underneath, and you get three pockets and an adjustable waist band. Sizes go from Small up to an XXL. From: DHaRco Price: $179.95 ODI F-1 Vapor Grips Lighter than a lock-on grip, and with more squish for added comfort. These are ODI’s answer to the popular silicone foam grips from the likes of ESI. Utilising ODI’s own A.I.R.E compound, these provide a nice squishy feel that’s supported by millions of tiny air bubbles trapped inside. ODI says you get a slower rebound for more control and more comfort, while a textured and dimpled surface gives you more to hold onto. As for weight? These come in at just 74g for the pair, which is a good bit lighter than a lock-on grip. From: Lusty Industries Price: $34.95 Lezyne Digital Shock Drive The Lezyne Digital Shock Drive is without doubt one of Wil’s favourite tools, which explains why he was absolutely distraught when he lost his 3-year old pump on the trail a few weeks ago. Thankfully he didn’t have to endure too many sleepless nights, as we’ve just had a replacement Shock Drive turn up at HQ to satisfy his trailside-tuning needs. A very compact digital shock pump, this little doohicky is small enough to fit into the stealth pocket of a pair of bib shorts. It has a nice, big display that reads to the nearest whole number, plus there are gold bits, which look sweet. If you want to tune your fork and air pressures accurately, ditch the bulky analogue pump and get one of these. From: PSI Cycling Price: $119.99 RockShox PIKE Ultimate Fork Mick’s custom-build Tallboy has just received a fork upgrade in the way of a new Pike Ultimate. One of the biggest stories so far in 2020 has been on this bike here – Mick’s custom-built Santa Cruz Tallboy 4.0. Equipped with a SRAM AXS drivetrain and Reverb dropper post, along with Zipp 3Zero Moto wheels and a Deity cockpit, it is one seriously good-looking piece of trail shreddery. If you haven’t read that article already, you owe it to yourself to check it out right now. The only part of the puzzle that Mick wasn’t totally happy with was the fork. To begin with, he built the Tallboy with a 140mm travel Fox 34 fork that had a 51mm offset. However, the new Tallboy is significantly longer and slacker than its predecessor, and is also optimised around a reduced-offset fork between 120-130mm of travel. While the Fox fork worked fine, the handling wasn’t quite right. To rectify its handling, Mick has just plugged in a 2020 RockShox Pike Ultimate fork with 130mm of travel and a shorter 42mm offset. Compared to the 2019 Pike, the latest model gets the revised Charger 2.1 damper, low-friction SKF seals and Maxima Plush damping fluid to provide smoother performance for greater traction and control. Currently this fork has the RCT3 damper, which offers adjustable low-speed compression damping and a 3-position lever to offer open, medium and firm settings. However, we’re about to get our hands on a Charger RC2 damper for even greater high-speed control. Stay tuned for an update on that one! From: PSI Cycling Price: $1499.99 Fox Flexair Lite Shorts Super lightweight and minimalist baggys from Fox, the Flexair Lite. For those who want the lightest and breeziest kit available, Fox has the Flexair Lite short. Built with TruMtion 4-way stretch fabric, these shorts have a very light and soft feel along with in-built ventilation via laser-cut perforations on the outside of each thigh. There’s a single zippered mesh pocket to keep your mobile phone or keys handy, otherwise everything is stripped back to the bare minimum, with a single ratchet closure system on the waist. A padded liner is included, but can be removed if you want to wear these with your favourite bib shorts. From: PSI Cycling Price: $149.99 Mo’ Flow Please! Enjoyed that article? Then there’s plenty more to check out on Flow Mountain Bike, including all our latest news stories and product reviews. And if you haven’t already, make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel, and sign up to our Facebook page and Instagram feed so you can keep up to date with all things Flow! The post Flow’s Fresh Produce | The Ultimate Pike Fork, Fresh DHaRCO Kit, Dynaplugs & Fox’s New Helmet appeared first on Flow Mountain Bike.

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
14 - 20/02/2020 22:17:13

Dirt Rag Fest has ceased operations and Bike Bash at Big Bear is taking its place for the West Virginia event on July 17-19th. 02/19/2020 Dirt Rag Dirt Fest WV is now under new ownership and will be moving forward as the Bike Bash at Big Bear West Virginia. The venue owners will host the festival on the originally scheduled dates (July 17-19, 2020). The team will leverage their turn-key infrastructure and 20+ years of promotion experience. They are looking forward to another awesome festival weekend. The event features an amazing trail-network, campfires, group rides, shuttle service, bands, family-friendly activities. The expo will offer bike and gear demos and product sampling opportunities. Attendees can expect a welcoming vibe true to Wild Wonderful West Virginia with trails that will provide thrills for all skill levels and views that can’t be beat. Join the fun and let your customers demo the latest bike technology, get up close and personal with new products, or if they’re curious – try an electric mountain bike. The technical trails will provide your customers with a challenge and will give them a true sense of how your product performs. Unlike many mountain bike festivals, class 1 pedal assist ebikes are allowed on the trails at this event. Information, including booth rates, sponsorship opportunities, and weekend schedules can be found here: demodays.com/bikebashwv Over the past three years, participation numbers have increased steadily. New sign-ups are coming in each day with over 1,000+ attendees expected. The July timing has been perfect to draw a crowd of eager vacation travelers and families. Attendee passes and accommodations may be reserved here: demodays.com/bikebashwv Bike Bash WV will take place the weekend before Outerbike Killington, VT allowing your demo drivers to make the most of Eastern travels by planning several stops. Our venue is ideally located to draw large crowds and offer your demo drivers the opportunity to visit local dealers, with Pittsburgh 1.5hrs away and 3hrs to Baltimore & Washington, D.C. “We were sad to see our event partner, Dirt Rag Magazine, close its doors after 30 years in the magazine business but we’re uniquely positioned to take over this very popular festival without skipping a beat”, says, Jeff Simcoe, Big Bear’s Recreation Land Manager. There is also a contest currently running; Anybody joining the email list will be entered for a chance to win a VIP Package for two. The prize includes event passes, a campsite, and a parking pass. **Note: If the winner has already registered, their payment will be refunded** https://swiy.io/joinbikebashwvnewsletter Eric Butler of DemoDays.com and will help with exhibitor registrations and sponsorships. Eric Butler 303-800-7088 eric@demodays.com Want to reserve your space now? Book your space using the online form at: https://www.demodays.com/exhibit/exhibit-at-the-2020-bike-bash-at-big-bear-wv For all other event questions, contact Jeff Simcoe – BikeBashWV@gmail.com

Posted by
Sickline
10 - 20/02/2020 18:17:16

Southern California Motorcycles announces the Grand Opening Celebration of its new Giant Group pedal assist bicycle store on Saturday, February 29th. The store will be a dedicated dealership of the 20,000 square foot Southern California Motorcycles complex and will feature pedal assist bicycles from Giant, Liv and Momentum—along with cycling accessories like helmets and shoes. “Some may wonder why we are opening an exclusive E-bicycle store in our complex,” says Southern California Motorcycles Owner Tom Hicks. “Believe it or not, there really is a tie in. Motorcyclists are getting older and for many of us, physical limitations affect how much we can do. These power-assist bicycles—yes, you still have to pedal them—are a perfect answer. You can get as much or as little exercise as you want, and you’re having fun.” “Come to our Grand Opening and see for yourself just how much fun you can have on an electric bicycle,” continues Hicks. “We will have E-bikes to demo and expert reps who can explain everything you want to know—as well as live music, free food, raffles, and discounts. Come have some fun!” Southern California Motorcycles can be found at 515 West Lambert Road in Brea, CA 92821. The grand opening celebration will occur February 29th from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The post Southern California Motorcycles Opens Pedal-Assist Bicycle Store appeared first on Electric Bike Action.

Posted by
Electric Bike Action
8 - 20/02/2020 09:00:53

“The best riding is outside the park” is the mountain biker’s version of, “I’m more into their old stuff.” There’s something rewarding about going beyond the ultra-curated network of lift-access trails to find something a little more raw and organic that makes you work a little harder if you want to reach it. And that Read More The post Bible Trail Guide: Park City’s Wasatch Crest appeared first on BIKE Magazine.

Posted by
Bike Mag
24 - 19/02/2020 20:17:15

Norco have updated their original full-suspension ebike! The Norco Sight VLT was first introduced back in 2018 and was the brand’s first eMTB. For 2020, the electrified all-rounder returns in the form of the Norco Sight VLT 29, rolling on 29” and boasting 160/150 mm travel. Norco Sight VLT 29 | 160/150 mm | 29″ | € 7799/£ 6995 googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Norco are claiming the Sight VLT 29 to be an all-rounder eMTB, which is as happy smashing technical singletrack as it is floating over gaps and tearing up flow trails. The new Sight VLT is powered by the Shimano STEPS ecosystem – the high-end Sight VLT C1, C2 (carbon) and A1 (alloy) models get specced with an E8000 motor and 630 Wh Intube battery. The more affordable C3 and A2 models use Shimano’s E7000 motor and a 500 Wh internal battery. All models are compatible with a range extender which lets you attach an additional 360Wh external battery for longer rides. Norco Sight VLT 29 Models Like the previous iteration, the new Sight VLT has 160 mm of travel up front and 150 mm at the rear, with RockShox taking care of the suspension on all models. The new Sight VLT 29 is the brand’s first full-suspension eMTB that is offered in both carbon and aluminium models. Norco claim to have engineered the alloy bike to feel exactly like its carbon counterpart, bringing the same ride experience at a lower cost. The 2020 Sight VLT 29 also features Norco’s Ride Aligned technology and is claimed to have the same handling as its non-electric brother, as well as being compatible with Norco’s in-app suspension setup assistant. Norco Sight VLT 29 C1 Norco Sight VLT 29 C1 | 160/150 mm | 29″ | € 7799/£ 6995 Motor/Battery: Shimano E8000/630 Wh Fork: RockShox Lyrik Ultimate 160 mm Rear shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ 150 mm Drivetrain: SRAM GX Eagle 1×12 Brakes: SRAM CODE RSC 200 mm Wheels: DT Swiss H1700 Tires: MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHR II MaxxGrip DoubleDown 29″ x 2.5/2.4″ Price: € 7799/£ 6995 Norco Sight VLT 29 C2 Norco Sight VLT 29 C2| 160/150 mm | 29″ | € 6999/£ 5995 Motor/Battery: Shimano E8000/630 Wh Fork: RockShox Lyrik Select 160 mm Rear shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ 150 mm Drivetrain: Shimano XT 1×12 Brakes: SRAM CODE RSC 200 mm Wheels: DT Swiss H1700 Tires: MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHR II MaxxGrip DoubleDown 29″ x 2.5/2.4″ Price: € 6999/£ 5995 Norco Sight VLT 29 C3 Norco Sight VLT 29 C3 | 160/150 mm | 29″ | € 5299/£ 5295 Motor/Battery: Shimano E7000/500 Wh Fork: RockShox Yari RC 160 mm Rear shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ 150 mm Drivetrain: SRAM SX Eagle 1×12 Brakes: Shimano BR MT520 203 mm Wheels: WTB ST i29 Tires: MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHR II MaxxGrip DoubleDown 29″ x 2.5/2.4″ Price: € 5299/£ 5295 Norco Sight VLT 29 A1 Norco Sight VLT 29 A1 | 160/150 mm | 29″ | € 5299/£ 4695 Motor/Battery: Shimano E8000/630 Wh Fork: RockShox Yari RC 160 mm Rear shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ 150 mm Drivetrain: SRAM SX Eagle 1×12 Brakes: Shimano BR MT520 203 mm Wheels: e*thirteen LG1 DH Tires: MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHR II MaxxGrip DoubleDown 29″ x 2.5/2.4″ Price: € 5299/£ 4695 Norco Sight VLT 29 A2 Norco Sight VLT 29 A2 | 160/150 mm | 29″ | £ 4095 (euro price not yet available) Motor/Battery: Shimano E7000/500 Wh Fork: RockShox 35 Gold 160 mm Rear shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Select+ 150 mm Drivetrain: Shimano SL 6000 1×10 Brakes: Shimano BR MT420 203 mm Wheels: WTB ST i29 Tires: MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHR II MaxxGrip DoubleDown 29″ x 2.5/2.4″ Price: £ 4095 (euro price not available) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Geometry of the new Norco Sight VLT 29 The Norco Sight VLT 29 is available in sizes S, M, L and XL with the latter being a new addition for 2020 – tall riders rejoice! The head angle has been considerably slackened to 64° and the seat tube angle steepens to a very upright 78.7° (size Large). The reach has also been stretched, and ranges from 425 mm in size S to a generous 515 mm in size XL, with the size L measuring in at 485 mm. The chainstays come in at 458 mm for all sizes. Size S M L XL Seat tube 370 mm 395 mm 435 mm 485 mm Top tube 553 mm 581 mm 609 mm 638 mm Head tube 90 mm 100 mm 110 mm 120 mm Head angle 64° 64° 64° 64° Seat angle 78° 78.3° 78.7° 79° Chainstay 458 mm 458 mm 458 mm 458 mm BB Height 354 mm 354 mm 354 mm 354 mm Wheelbase 1211 mm 1246 mm 1280 mm 1314 mm Reach 425 mm 455 mm 485 mm 515 mm Stack 603 mm 612 mm 621 mm 630 mm Our opinion on the new Norco Sight VLT 29 At first impression, the new Norco Sight VLT 29 looks to be a suitable update for its predecessor. Its geometry has been modernised, and the component choice looks solid – we’re especially happy to see the specced SRAM Code RSC brakes and Maxxis tires. While it still uses the same Shimano STEPS ecosystem as the original, this new Norco features the Range Extender for those who want more battery capacity. On paper, the 160 mm/150 mm travel suspension and progressive geometry make the Sight VLT 29 a very capable and fun bike. Can it match the brilliant ride of its non-electric brother? We’re looking forward to finding out! Check out how Norco’s longer travel Range VLT compared against the best ebikes of 2020 right here! For more information head to norco.com Der Beitrag Norco Sight VLT 29 2020 released – new 29er eMTB from the Canadian brand erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

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E-Mountainbike Magazine
12 - 19/02/2020 18:51:18

Munich, 19 February 2020 – The long wait has come to an end – after a three-year hiatus, Red Bull District Ride will return to Nuremberg! On the 4th and 5th of September, the quaint, historic Old Town of the German city will be turned into world’s biggest Urban Freeride paradise, welcoming the international Slopestyle elite to compete for the crown of the Red Bull District Ride Champion. Don’t miss any news – check out the latest info on www.redbulldistrictride.com and on Facebook Red Bull District Ride 2020. The German city has already seen its fair share of Freeride Mountain Biking history – starting way back in 2005 when Aaron Chase (USA) became the first Red Bull District Ride Champion. This year, the American Slopestyle veteran returns to Nuremberg and is responsible for the course design. He’s got a few tricks up his sleeve to guarantee that history is, once again, in the making. “We designed the course with the riders and live show in mind. There will be a flow to the contest that will feel seamless and exciting. The riders feed off of this energy and combined with the sweet prize purse we will all be in for the show of a lifetime! Nuremberg is the perfect city for an urban slope style like Red Bull District Ride: the city, the crowd, the atmosphere is all different than most contests. There is an excitement that can’t be duplicated because we are in a city with so many people everywhere, hanging out the windows and getting wild.“ The final district, situated in the very heart of the historic city, will be more progressive and spectacular than ever before – offering the thousands of gathered fans more action and adventure. More information about the course and the new features will be revealed in the upcoming weeks on www.redbulldistrictride.com. Erik Fedko (GER), who competed at the illustrious contest for the first time in 2017 as one of the young guns and who has been turning heads on the Slopestyle scene ever since, is looking to leave a lasting impression on the city of Nuremburg and its fans. “The one-of-a-kind course, the 80,000 gathered fans and the city, it all combines together to make an epic event with some of the best vibes ever – the feeling you get as a rider when dropping into the heart of the Old Town is something that you don’t feel anywhere else. To ride at Red Bull District Ride, you need to be an all-round Slopestyle rider – whether it’s riding huge jumps, skatepark, dirt jumps or trails – if you want to do well, you need to be able to ride it all.” The 22-year-old is aiming high in 2020, especially after finishing fifth in 2017. “Red Bull District Ride is almost a home game for me. I’m super stoked to compete and who knows, maybe I can even get a podium spot this year! I’ll definitely give it my all.” Aaron Chase knows what it takes to climb on the top step at Red Bull District Ride: “As a rider I would always concentrate on doing a few things that were different. There are so many guys throwing down insane moves and it can all fall through the cracks if everyone does similar runs. Be yourself and stand out!“ This is exactly what Nicholi Rogatkin (USA) did in 2017, when he put everything on the line to beat Emil Johansson (SWE), and landed a 1440 (4 rotations!) for the first time ever in a Slopestyle contest, edging out the young Swede by less than a point to take home the crown of Red Bull District Ride Champion: www.redbulldistrictride.com

Posted by
MTB-Mag
14pts
19/02/2020
10pts
19/02/2020
14 - 19/02/2020 11:00:56

Last weekend, Nairo Quintana blazed up the notorious 10km climb to Chalet Reynard on Mont Ventoux, to win stage three of the Tour de la Provence and take the overall race lead. After the stage, chatter across the cycling media was focused almost entirely on the return to form of a rider whose star has waned slightly in recent years. What didn’t warrant a mention, however, was that Quintana rode a bike equipped with disc brakes. Riding for the second-tier UCI Pro Continental Arkéa–Samsic team, Quintana piloted Canyon’s Ultimate CF SLX Disc frameset, with a Shimano Dura-Ace R9170 Di2 drivetrain and tubular versions of its Dura-Ace R9100 C40 Disc wheels. Nothing remarkable then, but perhaps that’s the point. Disc brake bikes might dominate WorldTour bikes in 2020, but it’s easy to forget the controversy that surrounded their introduction to the professional circuit, with concerns over rider safety and increased system weight initially stalling the rate of adoption. The first UCI road race win on disc brakes by Tom Boonen at the Tour a San Juan in January 2017, aboard a Specialized S-Works Venge ViAS Disc, now seems like a lifetime ago. And the fact a pure climber can win a race up one of the sport’s most iconic climbs (to Chalet Reynard, at least – the very top of Ventoux is covered in snow) on a disc brake bike without anyone batting an eyelid shows how far road cycling has come in only a few years. Have we finally crossed the Rubicon for braking on road bikes? Nairo Quintana won a mountain stage of the Tour de la Provence on a disc-equipped Canyon Ultimate CF SLX and no one batted an eyelid. Luc Claessen/Getty Images Have disc brakes won the battle or the war? Like any piece of new cycling tech, it’s tempting to argue that this change is merely commercially driven, and that the industry wants us all to believe our rim brake machines are obsolete and should immediately be consigned to the scrap heap, simply so they can extract more of our hard-earned cash from us. And while there is undoubtedly a certain amount of truth in that (yes, BikeRadar can exclusively reveal that the bike industry wants you to buy more new bikes), in reality it’s hard to argue with the fact that in simple performance terms, hydraulic disc brakes have a number of advantages over cable-actuated rim brakes, especially if you want to use carbon wheels. Even the weight difference between rim and disc brake systems has been rendered irrelevant. Many brands, Canyon included, now offer production disc brake road bikes that come in well under the UCI’s 6.8kg minimum weight limit for bikes. Of course, you personally might not need those advantages, but at the cutting edge of the sport the gains are more important, even if some teams and riders haven’t got on board yet. Cycling is a sport that has a keen and justifiable fondness for tradition, but the tendency for its upper echelons to cling desperately to outdated technology in the face of progress perhaps isn’t its greatest asset. It’s fun to remember, for example, that the great Sean Kelly doggedly stuck with toe-clips and straps up until 1993, despite Look having introduced its clipless Keo pedal system almost a decade earlier. I don’t know of many cyclists who, with the benefit of hindsight, think he was right to do so. And this is before we even think about other anachronistic cycling tech such as tubular tyres, presta valves, weight weenie-ism and derailleurs. Just because something new and better exists doesn’t mean we should bin everything we already have, but we also shouldn’t pretend that the old stuff is better just because it’s what we’re used to. Granted, a Grand Tour general classification win for disc brakes remains elusive at the time of writing – and that’s surely only a matter of time anyway (it would almost certainly have happened already if Team Ineos had a different bike sponsor). But with disc brake bikes now winning every other kind of road race, surely even the die-hard rim brake fanatics out there will have to admit that discs are now the default option for road bikes.

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Bike Radar