Top Articles

1
90pts - 23/10/2020 16:51:13

To celebrate their 10-year partnership Fox has launched a limited edition Tahnee ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
2
68pts - 17/10/2020 10:34:12

The results are coming in from qualifying at the second round of the 2020 World C...

Posted by
Pinkbike
3
62pts - 22/10/2020 14:17:13

Come on, how sexy is this bike?! Not only does the brand new Orbea Rise sport a ve...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
4
58pts - 18/06/2020 12:17:14

Damit hatte wohl niemand gerechnet: LAST präsentiert ein neues COAL und ein neues ...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
5
58pts - 22/10/2020 16:17:15

Specialized ha...

Posted by
Bike Radar
6
44pts - 17/10/2020 23:51:12

Is this the start of an updated Saint group?( Photos: 2, Comments: 7 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
8
40pts - 21/10/2020 07:17:11

An in-depth analysis of Shimano's newest motor.( Photos: 18, Comments: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
9
40pts - 23/10/2020 10:17:17

The UK government has just banned the u...

Posted by
Bike Radar
10
39pts - 23/10/2020 06:00:44

A right hand lever on the left hand side along with gobs of electrical tape make ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
11
13
36pts - 22/03/2019 13:17:16

The Liteville 301 MK15 is the latest incarnation of a true classic. The updated ve...

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
14
36pts - 16/10/2020 12:51:11

Gutting news for the top qualifier and World Champion.( Photos: 1, Comments...

Posted by
Pinkbike
15
36pts - 22/10/2020 19:00:38

Will Portugal's new measures affect racing next weekend?( Photos: 3 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
16
36pts - 22/10/2020 20:34:15

The new Rise Trail E-Mountain Bike brings you clos...

Posted by
Mountain Bike Action
17
36pts - 23/10/2020 19:17:13

It was a short season and Jack Moir came in hot.

Posted by
Pinkbike
18
34pts - 03/09/2019 23:34:29

Norco’s big-forked hardtail is back, and it’s back in a very big way! The 2020...

Posted by
FlowMountainBike
19
34pts - 22/10/2020 11:00:44

The Escarpe and Sommet get completely updated for 2021 while still remaining very...

Posted by
Pinkbike
20
34pts - 23/10/2020 12:00:39

Some massive stomps from Reilly Horan this summer.( Photos: 1, Comments: 1 ...

Posted by
Pinkbike
21
32pts - 06/09/2019 15:17:36

1,800 lumens, high beam, low beam, daytime running lights: the SL X is Lupine̵...

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
22
32pts - 23/10/2020 14:00:42

Relive an exhilarating weekend of racing in Maribor.

Posted by
Pinkbike
2
98pts
22/10/2020
3
90 - 23/10/2020 16:51:13

To celebrate their 10-year partnership Fox has launched a limited edition Tahnee Seagrave kit.( Photos: 3, Comments: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
4
68 - 17/10/2020 10:34:12

The results are coming in from qualifying at the second round of the 2020 World Cup in Maribor.( Photos: 1 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
5
62 - 22/10/2020 14:17:13

Come on, how sexy is this bike?! Not only does the brand new Orbea Rise sport a very slim silhouette, it’s also incredibly light. What makes the new Shimano EP8 RS motor so unique and how does Orbea’s new Light E-MTB fare on the trail? We’ve already tested one for you. Spanish performance brand Orbea is on a roll. Already last year, the newly released WILD FS with Bosch motor impressed the test crew of our big E-MOUNTAINBIKE group test delivering a solid performance on the trail. Just one year later, Orbea follow up with the Rise, which, with its modular battery concept based around the new Shimano EP8 motor, could set a new benchmark for weight and performance. We had the opportunity to test Orbea’s slim 18,18 kg Light eMTB even before its official release, putting it through the wringer on our local trails in the Black Forest. Orbea Rise M-Team | Shimano EP8 RS/360 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) | 150/140 mm (f/r)18.18 kg in size L | € 8,999 | Manfacturer’s website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); The Orbea Rise in detail With the Rise, Orbea have reinterpreted the concept of “sporty eMTB” and developed a new bike completely from scratch. At the heart of the lightweight, 18,18 kg Rise M-Team carbon-bolide lies a Shimano EP8 motor that draws its power from a modular battery system – more on this later. The first question that inevitably arises is: what type of rider was Orbea’s Light eMTB with 29” wheels and 150/140 mm travel conceived for? The answer is simple: sporty mountain bikers and eMTBers. So it’s hardly surprising that Orbea have used some of the key elements of their popular trail bike, the Occam. Depending on the spec variant, the Rise was designed to shine on long sporty rides and fast-paced trail sessions. The mystery around the “RS” acronymThe Orbea team keeps quiet about the changes they’ve made to the Shimano EP8 motor and are reluctant to disclose the differences between the standard motor and the “RS” version of the Rise. Multi-PurposeWith the main charging socket you can charge the internal battery and also connect the range extender to the system via a short cable with click connector. Unfortunately, there’s no quick-charger option in Orbea’s configurator. In the MyO configurator you can choose your very own custom paint finish The new Orbea Rise exudes style in all details From fast-paced after-work laps to epic Alpine crossingsThe 360 Wh battery is integrated in the slim down tube. With an additional (and optional) battery in the bottle cage, the Rise reaches a total capacity of 612 Wh. The internal cable routing is solved just as neatly as … … the speed sensor, which is safely integrated in the dropout Peace and quietThe chunky chainstay protector efficiently eliminates chain slapping. Unfortunately, this doesn’t eliminate the loud clunking noise that comes from inside the EP8 motor. The Shimano EP8 RS motor of the Orbea Rise Light eMTB or eMTB all-rounder? It’s hard to put the Orbea Rise in one of the existing eMTB categories. While at just over 18 kg, it’s a lot lighter than most eMTB with a trail-oriented spec, the Shimano EP8 RS motor pushes noticeably harder than a Specialized SL1.1 or Fazua drive. Orbea achieved the low system weight through a clever modular battery system, which relies on an internal, fully integrated 360 Wh battery. An optional 252 Wh range extender, which can be stored in the bottle cage, boosts the battery capacity to a total of 612 Wh. The big difference with other current light eMTBs is the built-in Shimano EP8 RS motor. According to Shimano, the motor of the Orbea Rise shares the same hardware as the conventional EP8 motor – everything except the “RS” sticker. Just by tweaking the software of the motor, Orbea managed to reduce the maximum torque from 85 Nm to 60 Nm and adapt the characteristics of the motor to deliver a more natural and sportier riding experience. Despite the reduced torque, the EP8-RS delivers enough power to keep up with the “standard” Shimano or latest Bosch drives – and easily outperform a Specialized SL 1.1 motor uphill. Because at cadences between 80 and 90 rpm, neither the Performance Line CX nor the EP8 use their full torque at maximum power. The difference in torque becomes evident particularly when setting off, accelerating and negotiating steep technical climbs: here the EP8-RS requires more input from the rider and thus makes for a very natural, sporty ride feeling and reduced battery consumption. The motor-hardware of the Orbea isn’t special at all, it’s just an ordinary Shimano EP8 drive. However, Orbea tweaked the software to reduce the maximum torque to 60 Nm Orbea’s engineers have done an excellent job of implementing the concept around the new, lightweight Shimano motor. That being said, they’ve neither developed a new drive nor improved the hardware of the existing motor. And that’s exactly why we don’t get all the fuss around the RS acronym, especially considering that manufacturers like FOCUS and ROTWILD have already been using similar concepts for some time, allowing users to reduce the maximum torque of the Shimano motor using the E-TUBE PROJECT app. Except for the torque set at 60 Nm, the Orbea should offer similar configuration options, at least in terms of assist characteristics1 and assist characteristic at the start2. Unfortunately, when we tested the Rise, the app wasn’t available yet. Without the “RS” badge, the motor of the Rise cannot be distinguished from the “standard” Shimano EP8. This is more than mere coincidence, because the hardware remained unchanged. The spec of the Orbea Rise M-Team Is there anything cooler than a new bike with a sick finish? Yes, a new bike with a custom paint job, where you can choose the color and design details. Because when you order an Orbea, you can become a designer yourself. Using orbea’s MyO configurator, you can pick your favourite colour and customise the paint job of your Rise down to the smallest detail – for free! But the individualization options don’t stop here. Apart from the finish, you can choose from a number of components to individualise the spec of your bike according to your preferences, riding style and terrain. With all versions of the Rise, the configurator lets you pick and change ergonomically-relevant components and elements such as the saddle, crank length, dropper travel, handlebar width and stem length according to your ergonomic requirements and personal taste. Depending on the spec variant, you can also choose other components such as the tires, fork and rotor size. Soon Orbea customers will also be able to order the range extender for all versions of the Rise – presumably from February 2021. The entire Rise lineup comes with Fox suspension. At the rear, a DPX2 shock delivers 140 mm travel … … and at the front of the Team Model, a 150 mm FOX 36 Factory fork with GRIP2 damper takes care of the rough stuff Important upgradeFor the time being, Orbea will deliver all Rise versions with 180 mm rotors, which are too small for the intended use of the bike. However, in the near future customers will be able to order their bike with 200 mm rotors front and rear, which is the setup we recommend. Unless you live in the Californian desert, we recommend upgrading the standard Rekon tires with a DISSECTOR on the rear … … and a Minion DHF up front. However, both of these tires are only available with a thin EXO casing in Orbea’s configurator. With its burly spec, our € 8,999 Rise M-Team test bike is trimmed for uncompromised trail performance. For this version, Orbea have bumped up the travel of the FOX 36 Factory GRIP2 fork from 150 mm to 140 mm. In the rear, a DPX2 shock provides 140 mm travel. Powerful four-piston Shimano XTR brakes replace the standard 2-pot version of the other Rise models, providing reliable deceleration on tough trail sessions. That being said, the 180 mm Galfer rotors are far too small and cause the entire brake system to overheat on long descents. In the near future, Orbea customers will be able to order their Rise with 200 mm rotors front and rear, which is the setup we recommend. If you don’t pay attention while configuring your bike, you could end up with the standard Rekon EXO+ tires. Unless you’re based in the Californian desert or planning to take part in a XC race on your new eMTB, we recommend selecting the Minion DHF/Dissector combo from the available upgrade list in Orbea’s configurator – these provide plenty more grip. For our test bike, Orbea had already fitted the right tires on the Race Face Turbine alloy wheelset for the wet soil of the Black Forest – a great choice for our heavy chief-of-testing Felix and his aggressive riding style! Light riders can also choose a carbon wheelset from the configurator, which should bring down the total system weight to less than 18 kg. Orbea is one of the first brands that also takes into consideration the purists of eMTBing, allowing them to select or deselect the Shimano display and remote from the configurator. This can be done thanks to the small EW-EN100 dongle, which replaces both the Shimano display and remote control and allows you to switch between the three support levels. For the time being the dongle is still a little rudimental, on one hand because it’s not integrated well into the cockpit and instead attached to the brake/shift cable, on the other because it doesn’t allow you to shift between the two riding profiles of the EP8 motor. However, Orbea have assured that there will soon be a software update for the Shimano E-TUBE PROJECT app, which allows users to switch between the two riding profiles. Orbea Rise M-Team€ 8,999SpecificationsMotor Shimano EP8 RS 60 NmBattery Orbea internal 360 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) Display Shimano SC-EM800Fork FOX 36 Factory GRIP2 150 mmRear Shock FOX DPX2 Factory 140 mmSeatpost FOX Transfer Factory 125 - 175 mmBrakes Shimano XTR 4-Kolben 180/180 mmDrivetrain Shimano XTR 1x12Stem Race Face Turbine R 50 mmHandlebar Race Face Next R 780 mmWheelset Race Face Turbine R 29"Tires MAXXIS Minion DHF/Dissector 2.5"/2.4"Technical DataSize S M L XLWeight 18.18 kgPerm. total weight n/a kgMax. payload (rider/equipment) n/a kgTrailer approval noKickstand mount noSpecific Featuresmodular battery-systemGarmin IQ connectivity features Clean cockpitOrbea’s MyO configurator allows (purist) users to deselect both the Shimano display and remote and run their Rise on a EW-EN100 dongle. This makes for a minimal look and very clean cockpit. That being said, there’s still room for improvement as far as the integration of the dongle is concerned. Display alternativeThe Rise is extensively linked to the Garmin ecosystem, which means you can use an Edge GPS device or Garmin Smartwatch to display all the relevant riding data! Further Orbea Rise models In addition to the Orbea Rise M-Team in our test, there are three more pre-configured Rise models customers can choose from: the superlight, top of the range Rise M-LTD model, which costs € 9,899 and weighs just over 16 kg (manufacturer’s specifications), and a more tour-oriented entry-level model, the Rise M20, which retails at € 5,999. Both versions rely on lighter components (e.g. two-piston brakes) and 140 mm forks. Last but not least, the M10 model, which costs € 7,599 and offers the best price-performance ratio in our opinion. Like the M-Team version in our test, it features a 150 mm fork and was designed for uncompromised trail performance. Orbea Rise M-LTD | Shimano EP8 RS/361 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) | 140/140 mm (f/r) € 9,899 | manfacturer website Orbea Rise M10 | Shimano EP8 RS/362 Wh (+252 Wh Range Extender) | 150/140 mm (f/r) € 7,599 | manfacturer website The geometry of the Orbea Rise Not only visually, the Orbea Rise has a lot in common with Orbea’s popular trail bike, the Occam, which lends its geometry and chassis to its motorised counterpart. While the two frames are pretty much identical, the engineers stretched the chainstays by 5mm to make room for the Shimano EP8 RS motor in the bottom bracket area. With a head angle of 65.5° and long mainframe (474 mm reach in L), already on paper the Rise looks like an aggressive trail bike. At 76.5 °, the seat angle is pleasantly steep and doesn’t slacken out excessively as the dropper extends. On top of this, the short seat tube and a generous seatpost insertion depth allow you to use long-travel droppers and also to choose from more than just one frame size. With four available sizes, there should be a suitable Rise for everyone measuring between 150 cm to 198 cm. Steep seat angle, short seat tube, deep seatpost insertion and dropper travel choice: Orbea really killed it with the Rise! Size S M L XL Seat tube 381 mm 419 mm 457 mm 508 mm Top tube 565 mm 592 mm 619 mm 649 mm Head tube 95 mm 105 mm 120 mm 140 mm Head angle 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° 65.5° Seat angle 76.5° 76.5° 76.5° 76.5° Chainstay 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm 445 mm BB Drop 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm Wheelbase 1165 mm 1194 mm 1224 mm 1259 mm Reach 425 mm 450 mm 474 mm 500 mm Stack 604 mm 613 mm 627 mm 646 mm Helmet Giro Manifest Spherical Shirt ION LS Scrub Mesh_ine Shorts ION Scrub Amp Kneepads Sweet Protection Bearsuit Light Orbea Rise First ride review Wow! That’s exactly how you want an aggressive, trail-oriented eMTB to ride! As soon as you hit the trails, you realise that the Rise wasn’t just designed to look great but also to deliver tons of fun on demanding trails. Amongst the striking features, the comfortable riding position, which reminds us of modern trail bikes. The steep seat angle makes for a centered and upright riding position. This ensures comfort both on flat trails and steep climbs, because the well balanced weight distribution doesn’t require the rider to actively load the front wheel. Despite the significant torque reduction, the Rise climbs extremely well on forest paths. Thanks to the low system weight and minimal pedalling resistance, the Rise makes for a fun ride even with little or no support. If you think that with 60 Nm torque the Orbea Rise is a nightmare on technical climbs, you’re wrong. Provided you’re using the right cadence, you can easily keep up with more powerful eMTB all-rounders. When the climb gets steeper, the tweaked software of the EP8 RS motor delivers a very natural riding experience and top modulation. This, combined with the low system weight and agile handling, allows you to negotiate technical climbs using your riding skills rather than relying on the raw power of the motor. Downhill, the excellent handling puts the Orbea Rise in the league of light eMTBs – in a good way. Because at 18,18 kg, the Orbea Rise is very light considering the burly spec. While a light eMTB isn’t necessarily a great trail bike, the Orbea is exactly that: the low system weight combined with a successful geometry, top suspension and sensible spec make for top trail performance. The 474 mm reach (size L) and 445 mm chainstays position the rider centrally when riding downhill. In open corners, the bike generates an equal amount of grip on both wheels, proving that the Rise is extremely well balanced. Thanks to its lively character and stiff, very supportive suspension, the Orbea Rise is damn fast yet easy to handle through tight corners and allows for spontaneous line changes, last minute high lines and improvised flicks to avoid obstacles. Berms and open corners are a real pleasure with the nimble Orbea Rise. The swingarm could do with better tire clearance. After a few high-speed corners, the paint already started rubbing off the seatstay. Unfortunately, the MyO configurator only includes tires in EXO and EXO+ casing. Orbea should add tires with a more robust casing for the trail-oriented Rise M team version. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Nevertheless, the Orbea Rise still feels composed even at higher speed and always inspires confidence. The sporty and stiff chassis gives the rider lots of feedback while generating tons of traction and offering plenty of reserves even at high speed – not even nasty root carpets and tricky rock gardens can stop the Orbea Rise M-Team. If you spend most of your time on rough trails, you should definitely choose the 150 mm FOX 36 fork with GRIP2 damper cartridge over the 140 mm FOX 36 with FIT4 damper. The handling of the ORBEA RISE is next level! Hardly any other eMTB is this much fun and so fast on the trail. Hardly any other eMTB negotiates jumps as intuitively and spontaneously as the Orbea Rise. Even with little physical effort and small bunny hops, the light eMTB jumps higher and further than most current eMTBs on the market. At the same time, it handles hard and messy landings without batting an eyelid and always delivers fun. Downhill, only the loud clunking noise from the inside the Shimano motor casts a dark shadow over the overall outstanding riding experience. Read more about the annoying clunking noise in our motor test. Conclusions With the new Orbea Rise, the Spaniards deliver a well thought-out overall concept, blurring the thin line between the ‘Light eMTB’ and ‘eMTB allrounder’ segments. Downhill, the agile handling of the light Rise M-Team is a perfect match for sporty and aggressive trail riders. Despite the torque reduction, the bike doesn’t compromise on the uphill either and the optional range extender lets you embark on long rides with your buddies with “Bosch League” bikes. If that wasn’t good enough, the many spec options and countless customisation options of the MyO configurator allow for an individualised customisation of your Rise. TopsOutstanding handlingModular battery systemMyO configurator allows for custom finish and specFlopsRattling noises from the motorPoor tire clearanceRange extender not available for the time being More info at orbea.com Assist characteristicThis is the level of support i.e. by how much the motor multiplies the input of the rider. With a high setting, the motor assists very powerfully with little effort from the rider, while a low setting means you have to put a lot of pressure on the pedals to get the maximum torque and power out of the motor. Of all parameters, the assist characteristic has the greatest influence on the feel of the motor on the trail↩Assist characteristic at the startThis is the sensitivity of the motor when pulling away and only refers to the moment when you put your foot on the pedal and exert that initial bit of pressure to get going. In the fast setting, the motor reacts quickly, with relatively little effort and minimal rotation of the cranks, making it ideal for experienced riders. The lower the setting, the slower the EP8 responds to input on the pedals, both in relation to the force exerted and to the rotation of the cranks. The assist characteristic at the start has a marginal influence on battery consumption as this parameter affects the motor’s output for less than a full revolution of the cranks.↩Der Beitrag New 2021 Orbea Rise first ride review – Light eMTB with motor power erschien zuerst auf E-MOUNTAINBIKE Magazine.

Posted by
E-Mountainbike Magazine
8
58 - 18/06/2020 12:17:14

Damit hatte wohl niemand gerechnet: LAST präsentiert ein neues COAL und ein neues GLEN. Bei der deutschen Edelschmiede scheint gerade niemand zu schlafen und so präsentieren sie bereits kurz nach der Vorstellung des leichten Carbon-Enduro TARVO nun die nächsten zwei spannenden Bikes. Wir haben das COAL 29 exklusiv für euch getestet. LAST COAL 29 | 170/160 mm | 29” | 14,58 kg in Größe 185 | Größen: 155–195 | 5.489 € (ab 1.799 €) | Hersteller-Website googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-0'); }); Ein Rahmen – zwei Bikes: Das LAST COAL und das GLEN im Detail Auf den ersten Blick ist das neue COAL 29 noch immer direkt als ein LAST zu erkennen. Doch die deutsche Edel-Schmiede hat den Rahmen des Enduro-Bikes deutlich überarbeitet und noch vielseitiger gemacht. Im neuen Modelljahr teilen sich das Enduro COAL und das Trail-Bike GLEN den gleichen Hauptrahmen und Hinterbau und werden dann über eine andere Umlenkwippe und unterschiedliche Dämpferhübe sowie passende Federgabeln an den jeweiligen Einsatzbereich optimal angepasst. Beide Bikes sind entweder als 29”-Version oder auch als MX-Variante mit kleinem 27,5”-Hinterrad verfügbar. Möglich macht das wiederum ein angepasster zweiter Umlenkhebel am Heck, der vor dem Rocker sitzt. Während die 160 mm Federweg am Heck des COAL mit einer 170-mm-Federgabel kombiniert werden, kommen beim GLEN 145 mm hinten und 150 mm vorn zum Einsatz. Die größte Neuerung am LAST COAL ist die freie Wahl der Laufradgröße zwischen einem 29”-Setup oder einem MX-Setup mit kleinerem 27,5” Laufrad hinten Möglich macht den Wechsel der Laufradgröße am Heck der Austausch des kleinen Rockers am Hinterbau – über ihn wird die Tretlagerhöhe angepasst Die Hard Facts der neuen LAST COAL- und GLEN-Rahmen: Material: 6011 Aluminium Rahmengewicht: ab 2,9 kg Federweg: COAL 160 mm / GLEN 145 mm Dämpferhub: COAL 205 x 65 mm / GLEN 210 x 55 mm Laufradgröße: 29” oder optional MX mit 27,5” Hinterrad Rahmengrößen: 155, 165, 175, 185 und 195 Preis: ab. 1.799 € (Rahmenset) Garantie: 2 Jahre inkl. Bikepark-Freigabe und 3 Jahre Crash-Replacement LAST COAL oder GLEN? Die beiden neuen Bikes setzen auf den gleichen Hauptrahmen in Kombination mit angepassten Rocker-Link und Dämpferhub Hochwertig, durchdacht und langlebig – Der Rahmen des COAL Habt ihr schon mal von „Total Bearing Quality“ gehört? Vermutlich nicht. LAST ist es besonders wichtig, dass man mehr Zeit auf dem Trail als in der Werkstatt verbringt. Dafür sind hochwertige Lager am Rahmen essenziell – doch sie sind nur ein Teil. Denn die besten Lager von Enduro Bearings nutzen nichts, wenn sie im Rahmen verspannt werden. Deshalb werden die in Taiwan gefertigten Rahmen in Deutschland nochmal nachbearbeitet. Konkret heißt das, dass alle Lagersitze auf einer 5-Achs-Fräse bearbeitet werden. Hier werden außerdem die Anlageflächen und Gewinde der Lagerbolzen gefertigt. Ein Mehraufwand, den man auf den ersten Blick nicht sieht, der sich nach Jahren in Benutzung aber auszahlen soll. LAST steckt sehr viel Aufwand in eine hochqualitative Lagerung des Rahmens. Dafür werden die Lagersitze in Deutschland nachgefräst. Um Bikern das Leben noch leichter zu machen, setzt LAST bei den neuen Bikes auf das neue universelle Schaltauge, das Universal Derailleur Hanger, und ein geschraubtes BSA-Tretlager. Die untere Mounting-Hardware am Dämpfer ist aus Titan gefertigt und dunkel beschichtet. Wer gern eine Kettenführung fahren möchte, kann diese an einer optionalen ISCG-Aufnahme befestigen, die am Tretlager geklemmt wird. Ein geschraubtes Tretlager lässt sich bei Bedarf sehr einfach und unkompliziert wechseln Pragmatisch: Der gewickelte Kettenstrebenschutz ist aufgrund der kurzen und schmalen Kettenstreben laut LAST die einzige sinnvolle Option. Die neuen LAST-Bikes sind seriemäßíg in drei Farbvarianten erhältlich: Raw, schwarz eloxiert oder, wie von uns getestet, mit einer blauen Pulverbeschichtung. Außerdem können auch individuelle Farbwünsche für einen Aufpreis von 799 € realisiert werden. LAST bietet zwei Jahre Garantie auf den Rahmen und stellt Fahrern obendrein ein dreijähriges Crash-Replacement zur Verfügung – nicht nur für Erstbesitzer, sondern für jeden Eigentümer des Rahmens. Neu bei den neuen COAL- und GLEN-Rahmen ist außerdem eine interne Zugführung. Die Züge werden im Rahmen in speziellen Schaumstoffhüllen geführt, um nicht zu klappern. Sie verlassen den Hauptrahmen nahe am Drehpunkt. Der Schaltzug läuft dann auf der Strebe weiter, die Bremsleitung wird noch einmal durch den Hinterbau geführt. Die Züge werden nun intern verlegt und verlassen den Rahmen ganz nahe am Haupt-Drehpunkt Die Geometrie des neuen LAST COAL und GLEN Eine gelungene Geometrie eines modernen Enduro-Bikes zeichnet heutzutage mehr aus als ein langer Reach und ein besonders flacher Lenkwinkel. Wichtig sind neben einer optimalen Balance des Bikes vor allem auch Faktoren wie eine große Bewegungsfreiheit durch tiefgezogene Oberrohre oder ein kurzes Sitzrohr, in dem sich dennoch eine lange Teleskopstütze versenken lässt. Das neue LAST COAL erfüllt all diese Anforderungen mit Bravour und punktet noch dazu mit einer angepassten Kettenstrebenlänge für jede Rahmengröße. Realisiert wird das über die Positionierung des Lagerpunkts am Hauptrahmen. Mit 428 mm fällt die Kettenstrebenlänge in Größe 155 für ein 29er-Bike extrem kurz aus und wächst dann auf 444 mm in Größe 195. Apropos Größen: LAST bezeichnet die Räder nicht mit S, M, L usw., sondern gibt immer die optimale Körpergröße an. Fahrer zwischen zwei Körpergrößen-Angaben können dank der kurzen Sitzrohre dann nach dem gewünschten Reach wählen. Wir haben mit 180 cm Körpergröße zur 185er-Version gegriffen. Tiefgezogenes Sitzrohr trifft kurzes Sattelrohr und ergibt so maximale Bewegungsfreiheit : Wir konnten mit 180 cm Körpergröße und einer Schrittlänge von rund 82 cm eine 185 mm lange BikeYoke-Sattelstütze fahren. Die Geometrie kann mit einer weiteren Besonderheit aufwarten: Das Tretlager ist bei den kleinen Rahmengrößen um 5 mm tiefer, da hier kürzere Kurbeln gefahren werden. Hingegen wird bei den größeren Versionen der Sitzwinkel etwas steiler, um den Fahrer bei größerem Sattelstützenauszug dennoch optimal auf dem Rad zu positionieren. Bei den ganz kleinen Rahmen passt die Trinkflasche leider nur, wenn auf einen Piggybag-Dämpfer verzichtet wird. Bei unserem Test-Bike war aber mehr als genug Platz. Die Geometrie des LAST COAL im Überblick: Größe 155 165 175 185 195 Sattelrohr 385 mm 385 mm 415 mm 455 mm 510 mm Oberrohr 555 mm 584 mm 611 mm 642 mm 675 mm Steuerrohr 95 mm 95 mm 110 mm 120 mm 130 mm Lenkwinkel 64° 64° 64° 64° 64° Sitzwinkel 76° 76° 76° 76° 76° Kettenstrebe 428 mm 430 mm 432 mm 438 mm 444 mm Tretlagerabsenkung 32 mm 32 mm 27 mm 27 mm 27 mm Radstand 1184 mm 1194 mm 1227 mm 1268 mm 1313 mm Reach 400 mm 429 mm 454 mm 485 mm 518 mm Stack 622 mm 622 mm 631 mm 640 mm 649 mm Die Geometrie des GLEN unterscheidet sich vom COAL durch einen 1° steileren Lenk- und Sitzwinkel sowie einen um einen Zentimeter längeren Reach und knapp einem Zentimeter niedrigeren Stack. Außerdem ist das Tretlager des GLEN aufgrund des geringeren Federwegs tiefer ausgelegt. Wechselt man auf das kleinere 27,5”-Hinterrad und verbaut den sogenannten MX-Link, bleibt die Geometrie bei beiden Bikes identisch. Die Geometrie des LAST GLEN auf einen Blick: Größe 155 165 175 185 195 Sattelrohr 385 mm 385 mm 415 mm 455 mm 510 mm Oberrohr 554 mm 582 mm 609 mm 639 mm 673 mm Steuerrohr 95 mm 95 mm 110 mm 120 mm 130 mm Lenkwinkel 65° 65° 64.9° 64.9° 64.9° Sitzwinkel 77° 77° 76.9° 77.1° 77.3° Kettenstrebe 427 mm 429 mm 431 mm 438 mm 444 mm Tretlagerabsenkung 37 mm 37 mm 32 mm 32 mm 32 mm Radstand 1154 mm 1185 mm 1218 mm 1260 mm 1304 mm Reach 411 mm 440 mm 464 mm 495 mm 528 mm Stack 622 mm 622 mm 631 mm 640 mm 649 mm Progressiv und an die Rahmengröße angepasst – Die Kinematik des LAST COAL 29 LAST setzt sowohl beim COAL als auch beim GLEN auf einen abgestützten Eingelenk-Hinterbau, der insgesamt sehr progressiv abgestimmt ist. Dadurch lassen sich die Bikes wahlweise mit Luft- oder Stahlfederdämpfer fahren. Die hohe Progression soll dafür sorgen, dass das Heck feinfühlig anspricht, stabil im Federweg steht und noch dazu genug Reserven besitzt. Außerdem gibt LAST an, dass über das geringe Übersetzungsverhältnis am Ende des Federwegs die Kräfte auf die Lager geringer ausfallen. Die Progression gibt LAST mit 41 % an – gemessen vom SAG-Punkt bis zum Ende des Federwegs. LAST gibt die Progression des Rahmens mit 41 % vom SAG bis zum Ende des Federwegs an. Der ideale SAG des COAL ist bei 30 %. Da LAST die Kettenstrebenlänge mithilfe der Position des Drehpunkts je nach Rahmengröße verändert, passen sie in diesem Zug auch die Kinematik auf die jeweilige Fahrergröße und Gewicht an, um so ein optimales Fahrgefühl zu bieten. Bei der Konstruktion wurde berücksichtigt, dass sich je nach Körpergröße der Schwerpunkt und so auch der Anti-Squat verändert. So konnte LAST möglichst einheitliche Werte bei allen Größen realisieren. Insgesamt deutet ein Anti-Squat mit rund 110 % im SAG auf einen sehr antriebsneutralen Hinterbau hin. In diesem Artikel haben wir euch noch mehr Informationen zum Thema Kinematik und die unterschiedlichen Hinterbau-Systeme zusammengestellt. Hier erkennt man den angepassten Anti-Squat je Rahmengröße. Graue Linie: Wert ohne Anpassung der Kinematik, was dazu führen würde, dass kleine Fahrer zu viel und große Fahrer zu wenig Anti-Squat hätten. Dein Wunsch ist LAST Befehl – Individuelle Ausstattungsoptionen LAST bietet sowohl das neue COAL als auch das GLEN als Rahmen, Rahmen-Kit mit Dämpfer und auch als Komplett-Bike an. Der Rahmen startet bei 1.799 € ohne Dämpfer in der Raw-Variante, mit einem FOX X2 Factory liegt das Set bei 2.358 €. Die Komplett-Bikes starten bei 3.539 € für das COAL und bei 3.299 € für das GLEN. Unser Test-Bike mit fetter FOX 38 Factory-Federgabel, einer kompletten Shimano XT-Schaltung, einer 185 mm langen BikeYoke-Stütze und leichten NEWMEN ADVANCED SL 30 Carbon-Laufrädern liegt bei sehr fairen 5.489 €. Den Preis für euer Traum-Bike könnt ihr direkt auf der LAST-Website ermitteln. Die Ausstattung kann individuell zusammengestellt werden. Unser Test-Bike für 5.489 € besitzt eine FOX 38 Factory-Gabel … … super edle NEWMEN Carbon-Laufräder … … und einen Shimano XT-Antrieb. Was will man da noch mehr? Laufruhig, sicher und dennoch spaßig – Das LAST COAL 29 auf dem Trail Das LAST COAL 29 ist der beste Beweis dafür, dass Geometrietabellen oft nicht die ganze Wahrheit über ein Rad verraten. Betrachtet man den langen Reach von 485 mm, den flachen Lenkwinkel von 64° und die dazu mit 438 mm kurzen Kettenstreben, würde man vermuten, dass man in Kurven sehr aktiv fahren muss, um ausreichend Grip am Vorderrad zu haben. Doch das COAL ist bei Weitem nicht so radikal, wie es die Geometrietabelle vermuten lässt. Der Grund? Sein Fahrwerk, denn der Hinterbau bietet sehr viel Gegenhalt, sackt nicht weg und sorgt so dafür, dass die dynamische Geometrie deutlich ausgewogener ist und ausreichend Druck auf dem Vorderrad liefert, als dies bei vielen Bikes mit deutlich gemäßigteren Werten der Fall ist. Der Hinterbau begeistert mit viel Pop und bietet enorme Reserven! Auf dem Trail bietet das COAL daher viel Pop und setzt den Fahrer-Input schnell und präzise um. Das Heck ist zwar feinfühlig genug, aber nicht so satt wie bei anderen Bikes dieser Klasse. Es filtert große Schläge gut weg, informiert seinen Fahrer aber dabei dennoch darüber, was gerade unter ihm passiert. Die hohe Progression ist omnipräsent und uns ist es kaum gelungen, den vollen Federweg des Bikes zu nutzen – der ist nämlich nur für den absoluten Worst-Case oder fette Drops ins Flat reserviert. Fahrer, die ein möglichst sattes Bike möchten oder auf der Suche nach maximaler Traktion sind, greifen besser zum Stahlfederdämpfer. Bremse auf, zurücklehnen und laufen lassen lautet – die Devise beim LAST COAL Dank des langen Hauptrahmens hat man viel Bewegungsfreiheit auf dem Rad. Das vermittelt zusammen mit dem hohen Stack im steilen Gelände viel Sicherheit. „Zurücklehnen und laufen lassen“ lautet die Devise! Schnelle Richtungswechsel erledigt das LAST COAL mit seinen 29”-Laufrädern willig und direkt und auch in offenen, hängenden Sektionen hat man stets guten Grip auf beiden Laufrädern. Mit seiner flachen Geometrie fühlt sich das Rad auf steilen Trails besonders wohl. Fahrer, die fast nur auf flachem Terrain unterwegs sind, greifen am besten zum GLEN. Über nasse Wurzeln könnte das sehr progressive Heck noch etwas mehr Traktion bieten googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1408638783102-1'); }); Den Uphill zum Trail-Einstieg erledigt man mit dem COAL gelassen. Der Hinterbau ist sehr effizient, wippt kaum und sackt nicht weg. Dadurch sitzt man auch im steilen Gelände zentral und hat in Kombination mit dem passenden Sitzwinkel nicht den Eindruck, von zu weit hinten zu pedalieren. Unser Test-Bike war mit einem 30er-Kettenblatt ausgestattet, was sich in Kombination mit dem 51er-Ritzel der Shimano-Schaltung als ideal für fiese, steile Anstiege herausgestellt hat. Bergauf punktet das COAL mit einem effizienten Hinterbau und einer gelungenen Sitzposition Unser Fazit zum neuen LAST COAL 29 2021 LAST ist mit dem neuen COAL ein großer Wurf gelungen. Das Bike begeistert mit seinem ausgewogenen Handling, guten Klettereigenschaften und bietet viel Fahrspaß. Wer es gern richtig krachen lässt und ein hochwertig gefertigtes Bike mit viel Liebe zum Detail sucht, wird hier fündig. Das sehr progressive Fahrwerk bietet viel Pop und enorme Reserven. Wer allerdings Wert auf einen sehr satten und sensiblen Hinterbau legt, sollte das Mehrgewicht für einen Stahlfederdämpfer einkalkulieren. Dank der frei konfigurierbaren Ausstattung ist das problemlos möglich. Stärkensehr potentes Bike für harte Trails enorme Reserven am Hinterbau effizient bergauf hochwertige Verarbeitung individuell konfigurierbare AusstattungSchwächenmit Luftdämpfer kein Komfort- und Traktions-Wunder Anmerkung zum Test: Wir haben von LAST ein Prototypen-Bike erhalten, bei dem es zu Kettenklappern und Lackschäden an der Kettenstrebe kam. Nachdem wir LAST davon berichteten, haben sie ein neues Teil für den Kettenstrebenschutz entwickelt, welches dann in Serie verfügbar sein soll. Bei unserem Test-Bike kam es zu Lackschäden an der Kettenstrebe Nach unserem Feedback hat LAST dieses kleine Teil entwickelt, das in Serie für Abhilfe sorgen soll Helm Smith Forefront | Jacke ION Hybrid Jacket | Hose ION Scrub Pant Für weitere Informationen besucht die LAST Bikes-Website.

Posted by
Enduro MTB - RSS
9
58 - 22/10/2020 16:17:15

Specialized has announced more affordable Pro and Expert versions of the ultra-lightweight S-Works Aethos road bike launched two weeks ago. The S-Works Aethos made headlines with a frame weighing a claimed 585g (size 56cm) made from Specialized’s top-spec FACT 12r carbon. The £13,000 price tag of the halo Founder’s Edition was also somewhat notable. The Aethos range is aimed at pure riding pleasure rather than racing, and has none of the aero features of the explicitly race-focused Tarmac SL7. The Aethos Pro and Aethos Expert get FACT 10r carbon frames and are a little heavier at a claimed 699g (size 56cm in “Satin Carbon/Flake Silver”, a colour not actually available in the UK), but still extremely light by any normal measure. Pricing starts at £5,500 / $5,200 for the Expert model, which comes with Shimano Ultegra Di2 and aluminium wheels and weighs a claimed 7.14kg complete. Related reading The new Specialized S-Works Aethos is a 5.9kg non-racer built for the love of riding Specialized S-Works Aethos Dura-Ace Di2 review The all-new Specialized Tarmac SL7 is here and it’s RIP to the Venge Like an S-Works Aethos, but much, much cheaper The S-Works Aethos is stunning, but the price tag puts it out of reach for most of us. Specialized According to Specialized, the differences between the top-spec S-Works Aethos and second-tier Pro and Expert frames lie in the carbon lay-up and the materials used, but ride quality, geometry and handling are identical, and all versions are disc-only. The one other key point is that, while the S-Works is designed solely for electronic drivetrains, the Pro and Expert models will accept mechanical groupsets too. Despite this, the three builds on offer (in the UK at least) are electronic-only, with a choice of SRAM Force eTap AXS or Shimano Ultegra Di2. Starting at £5,000 less than the ‘standard’ S-Works bikes, these get a full suite of tasty components from Specialized’s in-house component brand Roval, but are differentiated from the S-Works by subtle downgrades. The wheels on the Pro models, for example, are the more affordable Alpinist CL rather than the top spec Alpinist CLX. The CLs get the exact same rim, but are built on slightly heavier DT Swiss 350 hubs which carry an admittedly trivial claimed weight penalty of 117g. In a similar vein, the Pro and Expert models get titanium-railed saddles rather than carbon ones. Sitting at the bottom of the range, the Expert also has aluminium wheels and bars while the rest of the range gets carbon. Specialized Aethos FACT 10r specs, weights and prices Specialized will be offering the second-tier frameset in three builds as follows: Specialized Aethos Pro eTap Specialized Aethos Pro eTap. Specialized Specialized Aethos Pro eTap. Specialized Claimed weight: 6.82kg Groupset: SRAM Force eTap AXS Wheels: Roval Alpinist CL carbon clincher Price: £7,500 / $7,400 / AU$10,750 Specialized Aethos Pro Ultegra Di2 Specialized Aethos Pro. Specialized Claimed weight: 6.58kg Groupset: Shimano Ultegra Di2 Wheels: Roval Alpinist CL carbon clincher Price: £7,250 / $7,400 Specialized Aethos Expert Specialized Aethos Expert. Specialized Specialized Aethos Expert. Specialized Claimed weight: 7.14kg Groupset: Shimano Ultegra Di2 Wheels: DT R470 Disc aluminium clincher Price: £5,500 / $5,200 Specialized Aethos FACT 10r frameset Aethos FACT 10r frameset. Specialized Claimed weight: 699g Price: $3,200 (not available in UK)

Posted by
Bike Radar
10
56pts
16/10/2020