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1
54pts - 22/10/2021 18:00:32

Riding the unfettered dust with Damon Iwanaga and friends.

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Pinkbike
2
52pts - 22/10/2021 17:51:12

Riding the unfettered dust with Damon Iwanaga and friends.( Comments: 2 )

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Pinkbike
3
50pts - 22/10/2021 18:17:10

The two NinetyOne-songo-Specialized teams lead with just two stages remaining.

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Pinkbike
4
44pts - 23/10/2021 07:17:08

Once the champagne had been sprayed and the trophies had been handed out we manag...

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Pinkbike
5
38pts - 22/10/2021 17:17:11

A dirty bike is not a happy bike – riding abou...

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Bike Radar
6
36pts - 22/10/2021 19:00:34

“That was rough,” said Becking. “The pace was real...

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Mountain Bike Action
7
34pts - 21/10/2021 14:17:12

From clips to flats, casual to enduro, O’Neal ...

Posted by
Bike Radar
8
34pts - 21/10/2021 16:34:12

Here we are again with yet another new link. Almost a year after putting out ou...

Posted by
MTB-Mag
9
34pts - 23/10/2021 05:00:34

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MTB-Mag
10
32pts - 16/10/2021 21:34:11

Check out the full highlights from the event with angles you didn’t see on the li...

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Pinkbike
11
32pts - 21/10/2021 16:00:30

A heart-warming little piece.( Photos: 3 )

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Pinkbike
12
32pts - 22/10/2021 09:17:10

The 2021 Cape Epic continues with another day of racing for stage four.

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Pinkbike
13
32pts - 23/10/2021 04:51:11

Domination has been the name of the game for Sina ...

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Mountain Bike Action
14
30pts - 18/10/2021 18:00:28

How they succeeded as professional riders and racers while never losing sight of ...

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Pinkbike
15
30pts - 21/10/2021 12:00:31

Nik gave it his all and was able to put himself on the podium at the end of the d...

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Pinkbike
16
30pts - 21/10/2021 18:51:11

During the pandemic, BC POV built a trail and Remy Metailler met up with him to r...

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Pinkbike
17
28pts - 23/04/2021 14:17:13

Die neue polnische Radmarke Prime stellt ihr brandheißes 29”-Enduro-Bike Thunderfl...

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Enduro MTB - RSS
18
28pts - 22/10/2021 16:00:32

It's Friday and that can only mean one thing.( Photos: 1 )

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Pinkbike
19
28pts - 22/10/2021 16:51:12

As much as the sport of mountain biking was fueled...

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Mountain Bike Action
20
26pts - 31/01/2019 13:17:15

Hardcore is in the DNA of Sick Bicycle Co. They hit the ground running with their ...

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Enduro MTB - RSS
21
26pts - 18/10/2021 06:51:10

Press Release After a pandemic-enforced hiatus, th...

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Mountain Bike Action
22
26pts - 18/10/2021 16:51:09

Catch up with all the action from the Cape Epic 2021 prologue.

Posted by
Pinkbike
1
54 - 22/10/2021 18:00:32

Riding the unfettered dust with Damon Iwanaga and friends.

Posted by
Pinkbike
2
52 - 22/10/2021 17:51:12

Riding the unfettered dust with Damon Iwanaga and friends.( Comments: 2 )

Posted by
Pinkbike
3
50 - 22/10/2021 18:17:10

The two NinetyOne-songo-Specialized teams lead with just two stages remaining.

Posted by
Pinkbike
4
44 - 23/10/2021 07:17:08

Once the champagne had been sprayed and the trophies had been handed out we managed to catch up with the UK National Downhill Series champion for 2021 Stacey Fisher.( Photos: 26, Comments: 1 )

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Pinkbike
6
38 - 22/10/2021 17:17:11

A dirty bike is not a happy bike – riding about with your beloved bicycle entombed in filth will end up costing you precious watts on the road, as well as hard-earned cash through increased maintenance costs. Cleaning your bike with a pressure washer can save you a great deal of time and effort over the traditional bucket and sponge, provided you do it safely. In this step-by-step guide, we talk you through how to jet wash your road or mountain bike, and dispel some myths about pressure washing safety. Is it safe to use a pressure washer on my bike? At every professional bike race up and down the land, there will be mechanics frantically cleaning the bikes of exhausted racers. Despite having pro budgets, these mechanics aren’t going to be doing anything that would damage expensive components, jeopardising their riders’ chances on race day. Simply put, it is safe to pressure wash your bike, but like pro mechanics, you should follow some basic guidelines so as not to do any damage. Pressure washing dos and don’ts Unless you’re using a lower power pressure washer, avoid spraying directly at any components that contain grease (headset, bottom bracket, hubs etc.) Spray from a safe distance and slowly get closer Remove any delicate componentry Protect leather or other absorbent saddles from getting soaked Thoroughly wash off any degreaser before applying lubricant Protect disc rotors from contamination How to jet wash your bike – a step-by-step guide Step 1: Remove and protect Remove all vulnerable items before washing. Will Jones / Immediate Media Before you even turn the pressure washer on, remove anything you consider to be vulnerable from your bike. This could include your cycle computer, luggage you don’t want getting soggy, and any lights. A cover or plastic bag will protect leather saddles. Will Jones / Immediate Media If you have a leather saddle, a protective cover or plastic bag will prevent it from absorbing any water. Step 2: First pass Get everything soaked from a safe distance. Will Jones / Immediate Media Turn your pressure washer on and soak the bike all over, starting from a safe distance. Gradually get closer until you can safely remove the majority of the muck and no further. It may be tempting, but keep the jet away from your headset. Will Jones / Immediate Media Unless you are using a lower power pressure washer, avoid directing the jet of water into any areas that contain grease; stick to the main tubes and the tyres and rims. Your bike’s headset, bottom bracket, hubs and rear derailleur are all particularly vulnerable, as are pedal axles and any electronic componentry. Likewise, avoid seals on suspension components. If you’ve ridden through any animal excrement, be particularly careful when spraying this off your bike and seriously consider wearing eye protection because some can carry parasites that can cause blindness. Step 3: Degrease A dirty drivetrain will slow you down and cost you money. Now you have the lion’s share of the grime removed, apply degreaser to the crankset, chain, derailleurs and cassette. A stiff brush will loosen stubborn muck. Will Jones / Immediate Media Use a stiff brush to release stubborn grease and a chain cleaner to get those rollers running smoothly again. If you’re using a spray degreaser, be mindful not to get any on your disc rotors or braking surface. Step 4: Cleaning products If there is any degreaser left on your drivetrain, it will degrade and remove any chain lube you add on afterwards. Liberally apply cleaning products to the whole bike, especially the drivetrain. Protect your disc rotors from any overspray. Will Jones / Immediate Media Use a dirty sponge for the drivetrain and a clean one for the frame, seatpost, saddle and bar. Again, be careful to avoid flicking any greasy suds onto the disc rotors. Step 5: Second pass Use a final rinse to get all the soap off. Will Jones / Immediate Media Use the pressure washer again to remove any soapy residue from the whole bike, this time at a slightly greater distance than before. Any dirt should be loose and flow off easily by this point, so there’s no need to be close. Step 6: Dry Finish the bike off with a microfibre towel or old (clean) rag. Will Jones / Immediate Media Using a clean rag, give the chain a quick dry before leaving the bike to dry fully. If you’re in a rush, an old towel will do the trick, but laying the bike driveside up in a sunny spot is just as effective if it’s not too cold. Step 7: Lubricate and protect Once absolutely clean, add your preferred lube to your chain following the manufacturer’s instructions. Zetland Cycles / Immediate Media Nobody likes the sound of a dry chain (and it’s less efficient), so don’t forget to apply your favourite lubricant and wipe off any residue following the manufacturer’s instructions. It’s important you wipe off excess lube because it helps to stop your chain from getting contaminated with road grime or mud, which will put you straight back to square one. A protector spray will mean less dirt clings to your bike. Will Jones / Immediate Media As for the frame, prevention is better than cure. Applying a coat of protective compound before your next ride can save you precious washing time afterwards. It can also help keep your paint looking fresh. Clean enough to eat your dinner off. Will Jones / Immediate Media Some protective compounds are aerosol-based (others are applied as a liquid with a microfibre cloth), which can contaminate your brake pads, so keep it away from your discs,

Posted by
Bike Radar
7
36 - 22/10/2021 19:00:34

“That was rough,” said Becking. “The pace was really fast from the start. We just wanted to stay in the lead group at that stage, which we managed to do. We both felt good all day, so on the final climb, we said ‘let’s go’ and we went. It’s a great feeling when your legs do what you want them to. I’m also so proud of José, he is riding so well this week.” The post BACK-TO-BACK STAGE WINS FOR BECKING AND DIAS appeared first on Mountain Bike Action Magazine.

Posted by
Mountain Bike Action
8
34 - 21/10/2021 14:17:12

From clips to flats, casual to enduro, O’Neal has revamped its range of mountain bike shoes for 2022. Ranging from £75 to £120, O’Neal’s new footwear range covers all bases whether you’re a trail rider, racing enduro or looking for something more low-key to wear to the pump track and about town. What’s new for 2022? Having been first released in 2017, O’Neal’s latest MTB shoes build on the success of the original line-up, with new and updated models to bring the keenly-priced range bang up-to-date. Models from the entry-level Pinned to the top-end Session all focus on delivering value for money, with features you’d usually be surprised to find at each respective price point. For the flat pedal shoes, O’Neal’s proprietary Honey Rubber soles have been developed to offer high levels of grip, while still allowing you to reposition your feet easily when you need to. Closure systems vary from simple and adjustable laces to Velcro ankle straps for additional support. There’s even a dial and steel lace mechanism at the top end. The range also caters to different climates, from the highly ventilated toe box of the Flow shoes to the weather- and dirt-proof cuff of the Session. Whether you prefer a stealthy style or pops of colour to match your steed, each model is available in two colourways. O’Neal Pinned O’Neal’s entry-level flat pedal shoe is the Pinned. O'Neal Price: £75 The Pinned is O’Neal’s entry-level flat shoe, designed to offer plenty of bang-for-your-buck for riders on a budget. The honeycomb-shaped Honey Rubber sole offers a balance of grip and freedom of movement, while the upper has been designed to meet the demands of the trail rider. That means there’s enough rigidity to give a secure, supportive and efficient fit but with a level of flexibility to offer comfort, whether you’re out for an hour of power or an epic all-dayer. O’Neal also says the upper has been designed with durability as a key focus. Either opt for the black with dark grey laces or dark grey colourway with hints of red. O’Neal Pinned Pro The Pinned Pro steps things up with additional ankle support. O'Neal Price: £80 As you might expect, the Pinned Pro builds on many of the features of the Pinned but with a greater level of ankle protection thanks to a raised profile and internal support. If you’re looking for additional protection for bigger moves or simply want to max out on safety features as a beginner, the Pinned Pro could be a good option for you. There are a couple of colour options to choose from here: black with grey or a grey outer with hints of bright blue. O’Neal Pinned SPD The Pinned SPD is designed to be used with clipless pedals, though a screw-in plate ensures compatibility with flat pedals, too. O'Neal Price: £90 If you’d rather run clipless mountain bike pedals than flats, you should check out the Pinned SPD. These feature a different rubber sole to the Pinned and Pinned Pro shoes, with a two-bolt plate for the SPD cleats. You can also use them with flat pedals, by using the screw-in plate. Additionally, a nylon insert increases the sole’s rigidity for pedalling efficiency. The sole also has a resin running through it to boost stiffness. The lace-up closure retains the casual style of the Pinned range. With this SPD model, you can choose from a black/grey colourway or dark grey with neon yellow features on the branding, lace eyelets and tongue. O’Neal Pumps The O’Neal Pumps offer a more casual design. O'Neal Price: £85 From pump track sessions to wearing around town, the Pumps are O’Neal’s answer to a more casual, understated shoe. Don’t be fooled by their relaxed appearance though, as these also use O’Neal’s hexagonal Honey Rubber outsole, providing a balance between grip and foot repositioning when you do take to the bike. Otherwise, the Pumps are designed to offer a little more breathability and flex than the Pinned series, to give it more of a casual, trainer-like feel. There are two colourways to choose from; a very subtle black and grey or a more casual grey with gum sole at the heel and toe. O’Neal Flow The Flow is well suited to more aggressive trail, enduro or downhill riding. O'Neal Price: £110 The Flow shoes feature a two-bolt SPD plate for riding with clipless pedals, and a roomy, ventilated toe box to help you keep cool in hotter weather. Off to the Alps for your summer holidays? These could be the kicks for you. O’Neal has built on the popular Pinned shoes here with an additional Velcro strap to give a secure fit around the ankle, as well as a robust outer suitable for more aggressive enduro racing and downhill riding. Take your pick from neutral grey and black or electric blue accents on grey. O’Neal Session The O’Neal Session sits at the top of the range. O'Neal Price: £120 As the most advanced shoe in the O’Neal line-up, the Session SPD is designed with muckier trail conditions in mind. The neoprene ankle cuff helps to stop debris and mud trickling down into the shoes, while the ventilated toe box of the Flow is replaced with a more weatherproof upper. Just like the Flow shoes, these have been designed to be rugged and robust, and are secured by a highly adjustable dial and lace closure, topped with a Velcro strap to give a stable fit around the ankle. The Session shoes are designed to take you right the way from autumn, through winter and into spring and summer. Choose from classic black and grey or a flash of red on grey.

Posted by
Bike Radar
9
34 - 21/10/2021 16:34:12

Here we are again with yet another new link. Almost a year after putting out our first Norco link, we are now doing one for the Optic. As with all our links, this one makes the suspension more progressive, going from 17% up to 23%. It also increases travel by 5 mm, putting it at 130 mm even. What does this result it? The usual stuff. The suspension feels softer off the top and tracks over rougher terrain better then ramps up to deliver support as it gets into the latter half of its travel. Because this is a short travel bike that also needs to be able to pedal well, we made sure the link preserved the pedaling characteristics and didn’t turn it into a tank to pedal. Geometry also remains the same since that is one of the traits we enjoy the most about the Optic. So, if you’re trying to change up the suspension to help smooth out that chatter and don’t mind 5 mm more travel, this might just be the ticket. Or maybe you want that 5 mm of travel too. Now we read enough of the comments to know what the usual responses are. Let me tell you something, installing a different link doesn’t mean you have the wrong bike any more than installing volume spacers would mean you have the wrong shock. It’s a tuning tool. It doesn’t make the Optic not an Optic anymore, it just makes it a different version of itself. Specs and Details Fits Optic frames 2020 to present 130 mm of travel (with stock 190x45mm shock) Progression increases to 23% compared to 17% with stock link Sealed Enduro MAX bearings CNC’d from 6061-T6 in the USA Colors: Black, Silver Cost: $332USD Weight: 255 grams www.cascadecomponents.bike

Posted by
MTB-Mag
10
34 - 23/10/2021 05:00:34

Transition factory freerider, Jaxson Riddle, got into Redbull Rampage 2021, so Kyle Young, Oliver Parish, Hannah Bergemann, Skye Schillhammer and Nico Vink headed down to the desert to cheer him on.

Posted by
MTB-Mag